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Will Vodka Ruin Ketosis

Atkins Diet & Alcohol

Atkins Diet & Alcohol

On the Atkins diet, you take in a limited amount of carbohydrates a day so you have to count them scrupulously to make sure you don’t exceed your daily quota. Although you’re allowed to drink some alcohol on both variations of this low-carb plan, doing so may hinder your weight-loss efforts. In addition, you need to count the carbs in your wine and cocktails as you would any other carbohydrate-containing food or beverage and figure them into your daily total. Ask your doctor about how alcohol fits into your diet, because it may interact with medications you are taking. Video of the Day Alcohol in the Atkins Diet Induction Phase The Atkins diet consists of two separate diet plans. Atkins 20, the classic Atkins diet, consists of four different phases. The first phase is known as "induction," and it’s the most stringent; on it you consume only 20 to 25 “net” carbs a day. That’s the number you get when you subtract the grams of fiber from the total grams of carbs in a food or beverage. During the induction phase of Atkins 20, which lasts for two weeks, your body goes into ketosis – a metabolic process in which you burn fat for fuel in the absence of carbs. The Atkins diet recommends that you not drink alcohol in these first two weeks, or you’ll risk interfering with your weight loss. Your body burns alcohol before fat; when you drink, you switch out of ketosis temporarily and postpone your progress. The goal in the induction phase is to try to reduce your cravings for foods like sugar, alcohol, wheat and grains and to stabilize your blood sugar for the best weight-loss results. Alcohol in Later Phases of Atkins If you steer clear of alcohol in the first two weeks of Atkins, you will probably make significant progress toward weight loss. In the later phases, Continue reading >>

Atkins And Alcohol – Slainte*!

Atkins And Alcohol – Slainte*!

One of the first questions we are often asked is: “Can I drink alcohol while following this plan?”. The reason we are all so keen to know whether or not alcohol is allowed on the Atkins diet is a debate for another day! So why is alcohol one of those things that we are told not to consume while following a diet and are you allowed to drink alcohol while following the Atkins nutritional lifestyle? On Induction phase 1 alcohol is not allowed. But Induction is only for two weeks. The reason alcohol is restricted on a low carb diet, especially at the start is, when ingested into the body it is metabolized before the fat in your body, so in that case alcohol is treated (from the bodies perspective) like a macro-nutrient. This applies to almost all spirit alcohol and some wines. Beers, ales, stouts, alco-pops, flavored spirits, desert wines and sherry all contain higher level of sugars than neat spirits like whiskeys, vodkas, gins, aged brandy and scotch. Drinking spirits neat or on the rocks (with ice) or water is better than drinking spirits with mixers, with soda water being the exception. Sugar free tonic water is also fine. When you move onto OWL, alcohol in moderation is acceptable once you use the above guidelines you should be fine. To illustrate how many carbs are in a beer; a pint of draft beer (500ml) contains 8 grams of carbohydrates, considering that on OWL you should be eating between 20 and 40 grams of carbs daily then a glass of beer is far too high in carbs at this stage. The other down side of taking alcohol is that it may make some of your old cravings for high carb snacks, such as crisps and other high carb snacks that are associated with drinking alcohol return. Or it can have you heading straight to your favorite chipper or pizza place on the way bac Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Guide: Is Booze Okay If It’s Low Carb?

Keto Diet Alcohol Guide: Is Booze Okay If It’s Low Carb?

If you’re a boozy babe, you’re likely to ask the million dollar question: “Can I drink alcohol on the keto diet?” This keto diet alcohol guide will point you in the right direction. First, to answer your question: yes, you most certainly can have alcohol on the keto diet. That’s right, not all booze has carbohydrates in it! Most spirits have 0 carbs. Take a shot or four two of vodka, tequila, or gin and you’re still sitting well below your daily carb limit. A glass of white wine, like pinot or sauvignon blanc, only has about 3 net carbohydrates per serving. For the most part, you’re SOL with beer due to the gluten and high carb count. You’ll see in the table below that you can technically make some light beers fit your macros (IIFYM-style), but I’m going to go ahead and give beer a big thumbs down as a keto-approved beverage. In fact, I have a whole comprehensive list of alcoholic beverages sorted by carb count at the bottom of this post if you want to jump to the nitty gritty details of alcohol nutrition data. (CLICK HERE TO SKIP STRAIGHT TO THE KETO ALCOHOL LIST) But before you run off and get white girl wasted with celebratory low carb drinks, there’s a few things you should know about drinking alcohol while you’re in ketosis. I will admit right here and now that alcohol is by far my biggest vice. While my days of telling strangers I love them, sobbing uncontrollably over nothing, and woo-ing too loudly at concerts are over, I do still enjoy a good cocktail (Exhibit A: Vodka Mojito Recipe and Exhibit B: Kamikaze Shot Recipe, two of the keto diet alcohol drink recipes you’ll find on this site). This is a judgement-free zone. The upcoming lecture is just as much for myself as it is for you. The Obligatory Buzz-Kill Alcohol is not a nutrient. Boo Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

Alcohol on a Low Carb Diet! Alcohol gets a bad rep, and is certainly one of the most abused substances in the world. It can become a serious problem when it interferes with your personal/social life and well-being. To enjoy it we need to exercise moderation and self-control. If you like having a couple of beers, shots or glasses of wine to relax or have a good time on weekends, you’re in good shape! But throw a low carb diet into the mix, and you may find yourself struggling with the quantity of alcohol you’re drinking. People on a keto or low carb diet notice their tolerances significantly drop. And when you realize your favorite drink contains more than 30 grams of carbs in a small serving, you may consider giving alcohol up. Before you give it up, use our Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide to help navigate your way through your local bar and become a keto connoisseur. How and Why Alcohol Affects Us “…alcohol molecules slow down signals from the brain for actions such as walking and talking” Alcohol is actually the fourth macronutrient, providing our body with 7 calories per gram. If you aren’t familiar with macronutrients, you can read more about macronutrients here. Since alcohol is not needed for survival and is considered toxic to humans, it’s ignored under this umbrella of essential macronutrients. When we ingest alcohol (in the form of ethanol), our body begins to work to metabolize it, or destroy/break it down to get energy. Since alcohol is toxic to our bodies, we begin to metabolize it as soon as possible. The tipsy feeling we get is the alcohol being metabolized. Since alcohol molecules are water and fat soluble, they’re able to pass through and be delivered to pretty much all parts of our body, most importantly, our brain and liver. About 98% of th Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Having a social life on a ketogenic diet is something that many find hard to do. There are carbs pretty much everywhere you look, and that’s especially the case when you’re in a bar. Cutting out all the beer and wine is a great start, but sticking with hard liquor is usually the best choice. Even though hard liquor is made from natural sugars, grains, potatoes, and fruits – during the fermentation and distillation process that sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol. Drinking liquor can in fact deepen your level of ketosis, but will slow weight loss down. Ingestion of alcohol has effects on liver metabolism, in which more ketones are produced as you drink more. When your liver is taking care of the alcohol you drink, it’s being converted to a triglyceride which can also positively affect the production of ketones. Be aware that many people experience a heightened level of being drunk and at a quicker rate than usual. While that may be a great thing for some, you need to be careful – especially if you’re driving. Do not drink and drive. Be very careful when on a ketogenic diet and consuming alcohol. There are plenty of people that also experience worse hangover while on a ketogenic diet, so make sure you stay hydrated. The typical advice is to drink 1 glass of water per 1 shot (or glass) of alcohol you drink. Below you’ll find short and quick versions of everything you can drink. Scroll down the page to read a more in-depth explanation on each low-carb alcohol and what you should commonly avoid. Here’s a short list on what you can drink when you want to consume low-carb alcohol. Try not to stray away too much from the suggested list, but if you want more options scroll down and you’ll see a much more comprehensive list (including brands and carb counts)! Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

Another very common question asked by those new to a Zero Carb diet is: Can I Drink Alcohol on a Zero Carb Diet? There have been many posts about this subject in the Facebook group Zeroing in on Health. I have selected some of the best comments from these discussions and posted them here for easy reference. While occasional or even moderate consumption of dry, non-sweet alcohol might be okay for some people. Those who are new to a Zero Carb diet are strongly encouraged to abstain from it during their initial 30-Day trial. Once you have a clear baseline of how you feel on just meat and water, then you can easily test out other things like dairy or alcohol and get a much better idea of how your body is personally affected by them. … Dr. Paul Mabry: I’m a retired MD with years of low carb ketogenic blogging experience. I’m day 6 on this new and from all my research intuitively beautiful way of eating. There have been some questions about alcohol so I wanted to post this short answer on the basic science of alcohol in layman’s terms which apply equally to low carb and zero carb: Moderate alcohol can be accommodated on the diet. Alcohol is metabolized exclusively in the liver and does not stimulate the release of Insulin which is the big enemy of people like me who suffer from the metabolic syndrome. Things to know if you’re going to drink alcohol is that many forms contain carbs that can torpedo any weight loss. The worst offenders are beers, even lite ones, sweet wines though all wines contain carbs the dry ones contain the least and some drinks like hard cider and lemonade are as bad as drinking Coke. You will have to count carbs if you consume these. Drinks like Rum, Scotch, Whiskey and Vodka have zero carbs if you drink them with water. However, Scotch and Whi Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Low-carb Diet?

Can I Drink Alcohol On A Low-carb Diet?

December is here! Party season will soon be upon us. This is probably the hardest month of the year to stick to your diet. Among many other temptations coming our way, it is certain that there will be plenty of drinking going on. So can you indulge and still stay on your low-carb diet? The good news is, you can – as long as you exercise some basic caution. Carb content of alcohol Fermented drinks are derived from plants that are high in carbs – usually grapes or grains. However, during the fermentation process, most of the sugar is consumed by the yeast bacteria in order to produce actual alcohol. Some sugar may be left over, depending on the type of beverage. So alcohol itself does not get processed as carb by your body, and will not cause a spike in your blood sugar. Calories in alcohol However, alcohol is quite high in calories (7 calories per gram). These calories cannot be stored by your body in the way that excess calories from carbs or fat are. If you have a drink while eating or snacking (which is what tends to happen), your body will first process the calories from alcohol, making it more likely that any excess calories from food will get stored as fat. This is why it’s hard to lose weight if you drink regularly. Best drinks to have on a low-carb diet Carb counts provided below are approximate, as there will be a lot of variance across the board depending on the brand. Red wine is high in antioxidants and very low in sugars. It contains 3-5g of carbs per 5oz glass. Beware of fortified dessert wines such as port – these are quite high in carbs. Dry white wines, including sparkling wines such as champagne are also a good choice, at 2-5g per 5oz glass. White wine contains fewer antioxidants than red wine. Pure spirits such as vodka, brandy and whiskey cont Continue reading >>

The Truth About Alcohol, Fat Loss And Muscle Growth

The Truth About Alcohol, Fat Loss And Muscle Growth

I’ve been getting tons of questions relating to alcohol and fat loss lately. Happens every time summer rolls around. Outdoor parties, clubbing, vacations and the whole shebang. Alcohol is a key ingredient. What people want to know is basically how fattening alcohol is, how it affects protein synthesis, how to make it work with their diet, and what drinks to go for at the club. I think this is very good topic to cover today, since we’re right in the middle of summer and all, because most people involved in the fitness and health game tend to miss out on a lot of fun due to avoiding alcohol. I know a lot of peeps who’d rather stay home and manage their diet than go out and have a few drinks. Sad, really, because it’s all for the wrong reasons. I don’t blame them though. Read the mags or listen to the “experts” and you’ll soon be believing that a few drinks will make your muscles fall off, make you impotent, and leave you with a big gut. It’s mostly bullshit, of course. No big surprise when we’re dealing with the alarmist fitness mainstream that can’t seem to put things in the right perspective if their life depended on it. This is a definitive primer on the effects of alcohol on all things someone interested in optimizing body composition might be interested in. At the end of this article I’m also going to show you how a hopeless drunk like myself can stay lean while drinking on a regular basis. Alcohol and thermogenesis There’s been an ongoing debate for years whether alcohol calories “count” or not. This debate has been spurred on by the fact that drinkers weigh less than non-drinkers and studies showing accelerated weight loss when fat and carbs are exchanged for an equivalent amount of calories from alcohol. The connection between a lower Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

When on a ketogenic diet or other low carb diets there are many people asking if it is possible to combine ketosis and Alcohol. The simple answer is yes, you can stay in ketosis even though you drink alcohol but you need to be careful what kind of alcohol you drink. You can also not drink alcohol on a regular basis since it will impact your weight loss even though it does not take you out of ketosis. The main reason that alcohol will impact your ketosis is that the body is not able to store the alcohol that you consume. Instead it will start to metabolize the calories in the alcohol first before the body uses any other energy sources. This means that you will not use fat as your main energy source until the alcohol in the body has been used up. Still does not impact ketosis, but your weight loss results. Also when drinking alcohol on ketosis there are some kinds of alcohol that are better than others. Your first choice should be vodka, whiskey or other types of strong alcohol. They contain no or very little carbohydrates. If you do not like to drink strong alcohol then some dry wine is also quite okay. It contains some more carbohydrates but still okay now and then. Beer and other kinds of alcohol you should stay away from if you want to focus on your diet. To help you to know how many calories there are in different types of alcohol you can use this keto alcohol cheat sheet from dietketo.com Red Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Merlot: 3.7g carbohydrates and 120 calories Pinot Noir: 3.4g carbohydrates and 121 calories Cabernet: 3.8g carbohydrates and 120 calories White Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Chardonnay: 3.7g carbohydrates and 118 calories Riesling: 5.5g carbohydrates and 118 calories Sparkling whites: 1.5g carbohydrates and 96 calories Beer Based on 12oz or 3.5dL. Mi Continue reading >>

Cheating And You

Cheating And You

Cheating, or eating hidden carbs, whatever you want to call it. Let’s have a brief talk. What is cheating? Cheating is, in the most simple terms, eating a lot more carbs than you would normally. There’s no hard and fast figure, suffice to say that if you had somewhere in the realm of 50g – 100g you would likely break your ketosis, but it wouldn’t be the end of the world. It also stands to reason that you would possibly not have to go through unpleasant keto-flu again. How does it happen? Cheating can happen for a number of reasons, but there seem to be two main causes. Emotions Alcohol Comfort eating is something everyone I know does, and I’ll admit to eating an entire pint of Ben & Jerry’s on my own, no problems at all, when feeling down. Though those days are also long gone. You could be stressed, sad, angry, or any number of other things, and may choose to seek comfort in sugary foods. After all, they raise your mood, though it’s only short term. You’ll probably feel down that you’ve stalled your progress or simply eaten foods that aren’t great for your body. You might even drink alcohol for a range of the same reasons, or, as is very often the case, it may be a social event. A birthday, after work drinks, oh how I could go on… One thing’s for sure, too much can and will impair judgement. The last time I cheated was definitely after a few refreshments and I said “Hey, you know what, chocolate is a GREAT IDEA!” But it wasn’t really. You’ll Feel Like a Failure – But that’s OK! The worst part is knowing that you’ve failed, but you must remember that it’s ok to fail, if you don’t, then you’re probably not doing a lot of trying or learning. I recently read some great advice on failing. It stressed one point, and one point only, Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Can Drinking Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

I hardly ever drink, but when I do its vodka soda with a lime or a NorCal margarita. I was reading MDA's post about alcohol and he said that a clear (or even brown) unflavored liquor has no fat, protein, or carbs. I was wondering if it can kick you out of ketosis if you drink? Im not planning on drinking anytime soon (except MAYBE a glass of wine with the family on Christmas dinner) and Im not even sure if Im in ketosis yet (although Ive had a slightly metallic taste in my mouth for 2 days) but I was more curious than anything Continue reading >>

A Never-ending List Of Keto Tips + Tricks (add Yours!)

A Never-ending List Of Keto Tips + Tricks (add Yours!)

I’m going to start this list of keto tips I’ve discovered from my own keto diet adventures, but I’d love for you to jump in and add your tips and tricks! I’ll also keep adding to the list as I discover new things. Ghee is the shit. I mean, butter is awesome, but ghee is amazing, especially if you throw it on steak. Take Omega-3! Seriously! You need to have more Omega 3 in your system than Omega-6 (all those fats you are consuming) otherwise all that oil and stuff will do you harm. Don’t drink alcohol unless you’re having a cheat day, because it literally stops your weight loss. Cream cheese is not your friend, to make anything half decent you need a ton of it and it usually has a decent amount of carbs. If you whisk up heavy cream and peanut butter (I like Teddie Flax PB) you can use less peanut butter to make more and create a creamy delicious mousse we like to call “Peanut Butter delight” around here – add a little stevia if you want! Lemon water is awesome (helps your ph which gets screwy on keto and makes you want to drink more). I LOVE True Lemon packets. There are naturally low-carb dark chocolate chips out there that’ll solve any sweet craving. Cast iron pans will make all of your meat taste better. Toast coconut flakes to make keto cereal! Land O’ Lakes makes a whipped cream that’s sugar-free because it’s made with heavy cream. It has zero carbs and it’s amazing. Cool Whip also makes a heavy cream version that’s super low carb too, even lower than their sugar-free tub. Anything that’s “light” or “sugar free” is usually still full of carbs, sometimes more than the original one. Don’t waste your time with low-fat anything, you need to have the highest percentage of fat in your diet, versus protein and carbohydrates otherwi Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

As The Eating Academy approaches its first birthday in about a month, I figured it was as good a time as any to put together some thoughts on a subject I get asked about with great frequency. (For those wondering when I’ll get to Part X of The Straight Dope on Cholesterol, the answer is, “hopefully before the end of the year.”) A few months ago I was planning a post along the lines of “the 10 things you need to know about ketosis,” but I’m now thinking that might be putting the proverbial cart before the horse. So, let’s start with a more fundamental set of questions. In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that you’ll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of “experts” out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want to actually understand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I don’t expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you. But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know it’s trendy to make blanket statements – ketosis is “unnatural,” for example, or ketosis is “superior” – but such statements mean nothing if you don’t understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, let’s agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, I’ve deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. What is ketosis? Ketosis is Continue reading >>

Diet Vodka Drink Recipes

Diet Vodka Drink Recipes

Diet Vodka Drink Recipes - Vodka drinks recipes - allrecipes., Vodka drinks recipes from martinis to cosmos to the best flavored vodka cocktails, these drinks are happy hour perfection.. 4 -calorie alcoholic drink recipes won’ ruin , There's no reason to be stuck with boring drinks while losing weight. here are 4 tasty low-calorie alcoholic drink recipes that won't ruin your waistline.. Christmas alcoholic drink recipes - eatingwell, Find healthy, delicious christmas alcoholic drink recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at eatingwell.. Drink cocktail recipes | myrecipes, Our best drink recipes for teas, lemonades, and cocktails will quench your every thirst.. Food & drink - information | ehow, Need help in the kitchen? ehow offers quick and easy recipe ideas and cooking techniques for everyday meals as well as holidays and other celebrations.. Strawberry vodka drinks recipes - yummly, The best strawberry vodka drinks recipes on yummly | slushy strawberry vodka lemonade, vodka smoothie, strawberry shortcake drink. Hungry girl - healthy recipes, -calorie food finds, Hungry girl is your go-to resource for guilt-free eating. here you'll find diet-friendly recipes (easy and delicious ones!), tips & tricks, supermarket finds, and. Mason jar drink recipes | myrecipes, Put all those cute mason jars you have lying around to use with these fun and delicious drink recipes that are great for parties or even just a lazy. Your party guide diet-friendly drinks | sparkpeople, Wine: the most diet-friendly choice if you’re going to drink, wine is the most calorie-friendly selection with a typical 20 calories per ounce.. Vodka drinks recipes allrecipes → 4 lowcalorie alcoholic drink recipes that won’t ruin your → Christmas alcoholic drink recipes eatingwell → Drink and Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Alcohol

Ketosis And Alcohol

When it comes to the ketogenic lifestyle, there are lots of confusing and conflicting opinions floating around, and they can lead to all kinds of mistakes. One of those confusing areas is how alcohol fits into a ketogenic lifestyle. Hopefully, after you read this, you’ll have a pretty good understanding and some tools to use to make informed decisions along the way. First off, not all alcoholic beverages are the same. Alcohol is the same across the board; it’s a macronutrient with seven calories per gram, so that’s the starting point. It’s a byproduct of fermentation. Essentially, a sugar compound is acted upon by yeast and the yeast produces alcohol and carbon dioxide. Depending on the type of sugar compound, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages. Hard liquor, or spirits, takes the process a little further and adds distillation. That is, essentially, the process of “boiling off” the alcohol and then re-condensing (as it cools) it into more a more concentrated form. When you something marketed as “Distilled 9 times”, that just means they went through the boiling and condensing process nine times. Okay, so that’s where alcohol comes from, but that’s not all there is to it. Like said, the type of sugar compound determines the type of alcohol. For example, beer is made with, basically four ingredients. Barley, hops, water, and yeast. Barley is the primary ingredient, it’s where the sugar (maltose) comes from for the yeast. It’s also very similar to wheat. It’s a very bad carb. And it’s the reason that some people call beer “liquid bread”. It is far too rich in carbohydrates, not just the sugars, but the other “glutenous carbs”. So it’s a definite no for Ketovangelists. Beer does not fit into a ketogenic lifestyle. (Sidenote: A Continue reading >>

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