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Will One Cheat Day Ruin Ketosis

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

If you are eating a carb-restricted diet, sooner or later, no matter how much weight you've lost or how well controlled your blood sugar has become, you are going to run into the carby treat with your name on it, and when that happens, chances are you're going to eat it. What happens next may be the single most important moment in your diet. Are you going to be taken by surprise by normal physiological changes that occur? Will you start the three month binge-from-hell that leaves you wallowing in self-hatred while you pack on all the weight you lost and more? Or will you use the experience of going off-plan to strengthen your long-term diet success? The choice is up to you. Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking When you boost your carbs above the low carbing threshold--the specific amount varies from person to person--two things will happen. You will become hungry and you will immediately gain a startling amount of weight. The reasons for your sudden weight gain are explained here. Why Carb Intake Causes Hunger Cravings The hunger is a bit more complicated, especially since it may not kick in right after you eat the carbohydrates that send you off-plan but may take a day or two to develop--when you are eating low carb again. If you experience intense hungers immediately after you eat your first carby meal, the explanation is this: After you have been low carbing for a while, your body stops producing some of the enzymes needed to digest complex starches and sugars. It takes a day or two for these to ramp back up. But in meantime, when you eat carbohydrates your blood sugar may go up a lot higher than it normally would, even if you don't usually have blood sugar problems. This is why some researchers have reported that low carbing can actually cause insulin Continue reading >>

What Happens If I Mess Up A Day On The Atkins Diet?

What Happens If I Mess Up A Day On The Atkins Diet?

Following a diet is not always easy and it requires some willpower, especially with the constant availability of tempting food. Although many people find the Atkins diet easy to follow because of the satiating power of the generous amounts of fat and protein promoted on the diet, the smell of bread or freshly baked cookies may weaken your resolve. If you exceed your allowed carbohydrate budget on one day while following the Atkins diet, you can simply get back on track the following day. Video of the Day The Atkins diet is a low-carbohydrate diet divided into four distinct phases, each with a different carbohydrate target. The first phases are more restrictive and you get slightly more freedom with your carbohydrate intake as you progress through the phases. The induction phase of the Atkins diet limits carbs to below 20 grams a day by excluding all grains, sugars, starchy vegetables, fruits, milk, yogurt and nuts. Sugar cravings can be difficult to resist during the first weeks or even after a few months, and because the amount of carbs you need to limit yourself to, it can be easy to mess up and eat too many carbs. If it happens, don't panic, but be aware of the possible short-term and long-term impacts. Eating more carbs while following a low-carb diet, such as the Atkins diet, can make you gain weight fairly quickly. The day after messing up and eating too many carbs, you may find that your weight increases by 1, 2 or even 5 pounds depending on the amount of carbs you ate. It is important to understand that this weight gain is not all fat and that a big part of it is water. When you eat a significant amount of carbs, it makes your body retain more water and this is why you can see a higher number on the scale after a carb binge. Exceeding your carb target can impact Continue reading >>

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The “rule of thumb” for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not “net”): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Fat: to satiety Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right — an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK — but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get “into” ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. I’m a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one per Continue reading >>

Getting Back Into Ketosis After Cheating

Getting Back Into Ketosis After Cheating

Falling off the ketogenic wagon never feels great – I’ve been there, done that many times. Especially in the early days. I know that feeling of being disappointed with yourself and frustration at seemingly being back at square one. In those first few months, what would happen to me is I’d have a couple of splendid weeks, where I wasn’t feeling hungry, I could feel my clothes getting looser, and everything was going well. And then, totally unexpectedly, the carb cravings would hit. I’d go through a day or two of feeling this kind of tension and ridiculously insane desire for carbs. I ‘d resist and resist until a part of my brain that didn’t seem to be me would take over, and I’d find myself stood in front of the cupboard with a piece of bread in one hand and a packet of crisps in the other. What then would follow was a 3-day binge on pretty much any carb I could get my hands on. Followed by feeling pissed at myself and fed up at having to start back at the beginning. After the fourth or fifth time of this happening, I decided I had to really figure out what was going on here. Why was I falling off the wagon and how could I make it so that this didn’t happen. Here’s what I realised: First of all, if I was living in a way which meant there was a possibility of ‘cheating’ or ‘falling off the wagon’ – that meant I was essentially on a diet. And I didn’t want to be on a diet. I wanted just to be eating in a way that felt good and satisfying and which also led to weight loss and better health. I didn’t want to be eating in order to get to a destination, I wanted to be living my life now, eating each day in a way that just brought me more and more benefits – physically, mentally and emotionally. Secondly, I wanted to be in a position where if Continue reading >>

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

For those who follow a carb-restricted diet (low-carb, cyclical ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.), introducing a cheat day is not only a way to bring sanity into your meal plans – it is almost a requirement of sorts from a metabolic perspective to ensure that the progress with fat loss does not slow down. It is a bit hard for some people to understand how they can eat whatever they want and still get leaner – so let’s look into how and why it works. What exactly is a “cheat day”? Popularized by The 4 Hour Body book, it’s essentially cyclical strategic refeeding. You pick a day in a week (during which you would otherwise follow a restricted diet) where you allow yourself to consume copious amounts of absolutely anything you want, to your heart’s content. This concept is not new. It has been used for a while by those who followed calorie-restricted diets and allowed themselves one day per week where they would consume more calories than what they estimated their daily requirement was. As you now know, counting calories is a useless task. So we will discuss cheat days purely from the perspective of “carb refeeding”, because the assumption is that during the rest of the week you would be consuming limited amount of carbohydrates. Your total caloric intake during the day is never taken in consideration – only the ratio of different macronutrients. So, why cheat at all? There are many reasons. Pure ketogenic diets (those that strictly restrict any carbs) or diets that at least call for a significant reduction in carbs are psychologically tough. They are extremely effective in achieving the goal you might have in mind (whether it is shedding extra body fat and getting very lean, or using ketone bodies to improve energy levels, cognitive function, Continue reading >>

Can You Cheat On Your Ketogenic Diet By Taking Keto Supplements?

Can You Cheat On Your Ketogenic Diet By Taking Keto Supplements?

A ketogenic diet is a strict low-carb eating plan that forces the body to burn fats for energy instead of carbohydrates. When carbs are restricted, the body moves into a state of ketosis, a metabolic state that produces ketones by breaking down fats in the liver, which are then used for diet. Is it Possible to Cheat On the Ketogenic Diet? In a regular moderate to high-carb diet, carbs are converted to glucose in the bloodstream. Glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert into energy so it will be used before any other energy source. When the glucose is used for energy, the fats consumed are not needed by the body and are stored, resulting in excess weight. The effectiveness of the diet depends on your carb intake. Normally an intake of between 20-30g of net carbs per day is recommended and reducing this intake to less than 15g will give faster results. As the carb intake of a “normal” diet can range between 150-400g of carbs per day, reducing them to the level required to get into the state can be quite challenging. Because of this, some people may be tempted to have a cheat day on keto. The good thing is that, there are many ways that you can do cheats days or meals without breaking your ketosis state which a lot of people who have been on the diet for years can attest to. So, yes, there are are many ways to do it which we will get into in just a little bit. Keto Supplements That Help You Stay in Ketosis ​There are various supplements available designed to benefit those on trying the keto diet. Some supplements also aim to induce a state of ketosis in the body, even if the blood glucose level is too high to be achieved naturally. These products or supplements can also help you stay in ketosis even if you decide to take a cheat day on keto: MCT (Mediu Continue reading >>

Is A Diet Cheat Day Okay?

Is A Diet Cheat Day Okay?

Save While out to lunch the other day, a friend asked me if I had a “Diet Cheat Day”. I said, “No, but I do cheat on my diet some days.” LOL It reminded me of Angela asking me about that on Facebook recently: “Do you think it’s okay just to have cheat days? I totally blew it last week and had three slices of xtra thin pizza (10 net carbs each)… then I forgave myself and called it a diet cheat day instead. I figure once every 10 days or so shouldn’t hurt!” Is a Diet Cheat Day Okay? Yes and No… Angela said: “My bf is reading The 4 Hour Body and he says they recommend having cheat days too.” On some low carb diet plans, particularly Tim Ferris’ “slow carb diet” mentioned in his 4HB book, a diet cheat day is scheduled in. Tim recommends totally binging on all your vices every Saturday, even. I have done zero research and have no scientific evidence regarding diet cheat days OR the slow carb diet. That said, a friend and I both started dieting around the same time. She was doing slow carb (with a cheat day every week), I was of course doing the traditional low carb diet. I lost more weight in a shorter amount of time. My personal opinion, and my advice (to myself, and to you) is to stick to a strict low carb diet until you lose your goal weight. I started the low carb diet with the intention of losing 20 pounds. Which I did, and fairly quick – in just over 2 months. I have continued to lose weight, and am aiming to lose at least 10 more pounds. Once you have reached your ideal weight, you can increase your carb intake (eating good carbs, of course) until you find your ideal number. Meaning you don’t gain weight. I started my diet by eating less than 20 net carbs per day. For example, once I have achieved my ideal weight, I may find I can mai Continue reading >>

How To Lose 20 Lbs. Of Fat In 30 Days… Without Doing Any Exercise

How To Lose 20 Lbs. Of Fat In 30 Days… Without Doing Any Exercise

Fat Loss via Better Science and Simplicity It is possible to lose 20 lbs. of bodyfat in 30 days by optimizing any of three factors: exercise, diet, or drug/supplement regimen. I’ve seen the elite implementation of all three in working with professional athletes. In this post, we’ll explore what I refer to as the “slow-carb diet”. In the last six weeks, I have cut from about 180 lbs. to 165 lbs., while adding about 10 lbs. of muscle, which means I’ve lost about 25 lbs. of fat. This is the only diet besides the rather extreme Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD) that has produced veins across my abdomen, which is the last place I lose fat (damn you, Scandinavian genetics). Here are the four simple rules I followed… Rule #1: Avoid “white” carbohydrates Avoid any carbohydrate that is — or can be — white. The following foods are thus prohibited, except for within 1.5 hours of finishing a resistance-training workout of at least 20 minutes in length: bread, rice, cereal, potatoes, pasta, and fried food with breading. If you avoid eating anything white, you’ll be safe. Rule #2: Eat the same few meals over and over again The most successful dieters, regardless of whether their goal is muscle gain or fat loss, eat the same few meals over and over again. Mix and match, constructing each meal with one from each of the three following groups: Proteins: Egg whites with one whole egg for flavor Chicken breast or thigh Grass-fed organic beef Pork Legumes: Lentils Black beans Pinto beans Vegetables: Spinach Asparagus Peas Mixed vegetables Eat as much as you like of the above food items. Just remember: keep it simple. Pick three or four meals and repeat them. Almost all restaurants can give you a salad or vegetables in place of french fries or potatoes. Surprisingly, I hav Continue reading >>

How To Re-feed Carbs On Vince Gironda’s Ketogenic Steak And Eggs Diet

How To Re-feed Carbs On Vince Gironda’s Ketogenic Steak And Eggs Diet

I was asked the following question recently on the Anaerobixx Facebook page: Hi, I learned of the steak and eggs diet from your posts. What do you have on the cheat day? Is it supposed to be something like ice cream or more like rice, french fries, etc? Cheat day or cheat meal? Vince Gironda, who came up with the steak and eggs diet suggested you either eat a high-carbohydrate MEAL every three or four days or a DAY of high-carbohydrate meals once a week. If you decide to eat a small carbohydrate meal every few days, you should probably just eat a sensible meal of pasta, rice, potatoes, etc. If you opt for a full-blown cheat day and only eat carbs once a week, which I personally do, you can go a little overboard and it won’t ruin your diet. Re-feed day or junk day? The idea behind the re-feed day is to change from the high-fat, high-protein, zero-carb macronutrient ratios that you follow during the week for a high-carb, moderate-protein, low-fat day. In general, you can eat whatever you want on your cheat day. Concentrate on eating carbohydrates and try to keep what you eat low-fat, but you don’t need to worry too much about your macronutrient ratios or how many calories you’re consuming on this one day of the week. What I’ve noticed is that the greater the caloric deficit during the week, the greater the chances that my re-feed day will turn into a junk day. Last week, for instance, I noticed that I wasn’t getting enough calories (because I was hungry all the time) so I increased my fat intake. I’m still in a caloric deficit, I’m still burning more calories than I’m eating every day, but that caloric deficit isn’t so extreme that I’m hungry and craving carbs 24 / 7 even though I’m still losing weight. As a result, my cheat day last Saturday was ver Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Weight Faster If I Cut Out Fruit?

Will I Lose Weight Faster If I Cut Out Fruit?

If you’re trying to lose weight with Paleo, one of the first pieces of advice you’ll probably get is “cut out fruit.” Depending on your weight-loss plan and goals, eliminating fruit may or may not be good advice. If you’re trying to get into ketosis, or if fruit just fuels your sugar cravings, then cutting it out may be a good plan. If you’re stuck in a plateau and the scale isn’t moving, it’s a reasonable experiment to try. But on the other hand, not everyone benefits from cutting it out, and there’s no point in restricting another food group if it doesn’t actually help you. Cutting out Fruit to Stay in Ketosis One argument from the very-low-carb corners of the Paleo world is that fruit just doesn’t play nicely with ketosis. Ketosis is a total metabolic switch from burning carbs to burning fat for energy. It can be very useful for weight loss, especially for people with a lot to lose. A truly ketogenic diet is around 80% fat by calories. That leaves about 20% for carbs and protein together, with a typical upper limit of around 50 grams of carbohydrate (depending on what you’re eating and how your particular body works, this could be lower). Just to put that into perspective, 1 apple or 1 banana contains about 31 grams of carbs. That looks like it might fit into a day of keto eating, but for some people even that might be too much. And even for people who can tolerate around 50 grams of carbohydrate without getting kicked out of ketosis, eating that fruit would severely limit their options for the rest of the day. In particular, it would be displacing vegetables, which are more nutritious for the amount of carbs they contain. Crowding vegetables off your plate to make room for fruit is rarely a good idea. If ketosis is your plan for weight loss, Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

Did you let go of your low carb diet for the holidays? Have a free meal? Maybe a carb up? Or go out to dinner? Restaurants are well known for hiding sugar in their salad dressings and putting other carby ingredients into their food that you might not know about. What you expect to be low carb isn't always as low as you think. All it takes is a single teaspoon of sugar in the salad dressing or a light dusting of flour on that chicken breast and you'll experience the consequences without even know why! However, all is not lost! You can recover from your setback and get back into ketosis almost as fast as water fasting by following the diet plan outlined below. If you went to a Christmas party, you might not have been able to tell if your food was really free of carbs, or not. You might have not wanted to upset the host, or you didn't want to feel left out, so you ate something that wasn't on plan. Tempting Christmas treats are the downfall of many. Perhaps, you deliberately caved in to those delicious looking cupcakes or a soft, fluffy donut that your boss or co-worker brought into the office. The holidays are not the only time that your self discipline and love for low carb eating will be put to the test. Maybe you went on vacation and decided to not bother with all of that carb counting stuff. If so, you might have gained a few pounds. You also might have decided to chuck the low-carb dieting game, kick back, eat what you consider a normal diet, and just enjoy your vacation. All of that delicious food looked too good to pass up! If you work out regularly and did a carb up to improve hormonal balance by bumping up your Leptin level, you might also be wondering if there's a way to get back into ketosis more quickly than water fasting. If so, this article will help you, to Continue reading >>

My 3 Months Journey With Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet

My 3 Months Journey With Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet

Over the past 3 months, I have been experimenting with a diet called ketogenic diet. Although it was originally developed as a cure for patient with epilepsy, ketogenic diet has been found to have many health benefits like prevent cancer, epilepsy, diabetics, increase focus and the most important, accelerate fat loss. I had heard about it many times before but never gave it a serious thought. 10 days before my experiment, I stumbled upon the work of Peter Attia and his blog, The Eating Academy. I was blown away by his story and his research on ketosis, insulin resistance, sports nutrition, performance and many more. I started reading all of his articles on ketosis and ketogenic diet, which nudged me to try the ketogenic diet myself. As you all know, this blog is all about me trying and experimenting new stuffs and sharing my experience and learning with you. So, after my long nights of research, I decided to give ketogenic diet a try. What is Ketosis and Ketogenic Diet? To people who don’t know what ketosis and ketogenic diet is, this definition would help: “The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates.” “Ketosis /kɨˈtoʊsɨs/ is a metabolic state where most of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis where blood glucose provides most of the energy” To put it simply, ketogenic diet is basically a way to get our bodies to enter into a condition known as ketosis. In this state, our liver starts to produce ketones, which in turn shifts our bodies to uses fats as the primary source of energy. While in this state Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

Note: Please note that if you are interested in a Ketogenic Diet used to treat Epilepsy or Pediatric Epilepsy, please start at Johns Hopkins who are the pioneers in this field. The wikipedia page for the Ketogenic Diet diet also has information on the diet as it relates to treating epilepsy. The diet below is simply for rapid and effective weight loss and uses a 1 to 1 fat to protein ratio rather than the 4 to 1 fat to combined protein and carbs ratio of the Ketogenic Diet pioneered by Johns Hopkins used to treat epilepsy. [wp_ad_camp_3] Disclaimer: I am neither a doctor nor self proclaimed nutrition expert so please consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any action that affects your health and wellbeing. After finishing Gary Taubes latest book, which seems to have rapidly become the cornerstone of a new approach to nutrition, I’ve become very interested in the Ketogenic diet. The speed of weight loss I’ve seen is incredible and my energy level has remained high. The science behind a ketogenic diet is solidly backed up by Taubes research published in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat“. According to Taubes’ research, it may also be the only way for people who have become severely insulin resistant, to effectively lose weight. The Ketogenic diet has always lived on the fringes of diet lore and has been seen as extreme. But the reality is that the low glycemic index diet (Low GI Diet) is effective because it is close to, but not quite, a ketogenic diet. Other diets like the South Beach Diet are also only effective because of the reduction in carbs and consequently insulin levels. The science behind this diet looks solid and it is part of the massive shift in nutrition research we’ve seen in the last few years. Prominent sport Continue reading >>

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