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Will One Cheat Day Ruin Ketosis

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

Note: Please note that if you are interested in a Ketogenic Diet used to treat Epilepsy or Pediatric Epilepsy, please start at Johns Hopkins who are the pioneers in this field. The wikipedia page for the Ketogenic Diet diet also has information on the diet as it relates to treating epilepsy. The diet below is simply for rapid and effective weight loss and uses a 1 to 1 fat to protein ratio rather than the 4 to 1 fat to combined protein and carbs ratio of the Ketogenic Diet pioneered by Johns Hopkins used to treat epilepsy. [wp_ad_camp_3] Disclaimer: I am neither a doctor nor self proclaimed nutrition expert so please consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any action that affects your health and wellbeing. After finishing Gary Taubes latest book, which seems to have rapidly become the cornerstone of a new approach to nutrition, I’ve become very interested in the Ketogenic diet. The speed of weight loss I’ve seen is incredible and my energy level has remained high. The science behind a ketogenic diet is solidly backed up by Taubes research published in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat“. According to Taubes’ research, it may also be the only way for people who have become severely insulin resistant, to effectively lose weight. The Ketogenic diet has always lived on the fringes of diet lore and has been seen as extreme. But the reality is that the low glycemic index diet (Low GI Diet) is effective because it is close to, but not quite, a ketogenic diet. Other diets like the South Beach Diet are also only effective because of the reduction in carbs and consequently insulin levels. The science behind this diet looks solid and it is part of the massive shift in nutrition research we’ve seen in the last few years. Prominent sport Continue reading >>

How To Eat One Meal A Day (omad) With Keto – Step-by-step Guide

How To Eat One Meal A Day (omad) With Keto – Step-by-step Guide

2 What is a Keto Diet? I think we can agree that: Combining another diet when eating one meal a day may seem challenging and confusing. For those interested in combining the keto diet with omad, there is hope. To help you better understand the benefits of these diets, let’s examine both and see whether or not they can be used together. The ideas behind omad and keto are often very similar and may work to help you lose weight very quickly. Let’s also take a look at the scientific findings that support the benefits of these approaches. The keto diet is structured around tricking your body to enter what is known as ketosis. Before discussing that, let’s discuss the two different ways that your body gets the energy it needs to make it through the day. The most common way it gets energy is burning sugar from carbohydrates. As the body digests carbs and sugar is introduced into the body, insulin is produced in the body to help process it. After the body has burned this sugar, it will start to lag in energy and kick in your instinct to eat. These peaks and lulls are well-known by most people as sugar highs and crashes. They are part of the reason why so many people in the world are obese. People often overeat or focus on foods with simple sugar to get quick energy. As a result, they eat too much and too often. Ketosis differs from this method because it focuses on burning fat and protein to provide you with energy. Fat is a very dense and energy-filled food that will provide you with consistent power throughout the day. This fact is particularly true if you eat a diet filled with healthy fats and protein. However, ketosis only goes into effect if your body has next to no carbohydrates in it during the day. Tricking Your Body Into Ketosis While ketosis is a survival techn Continue reading >>

The Low Down On Intermittent Fasting

The Low Down On Intermittent Fasting

To view the original article about the ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting, click here! I’ve been training since I’ve been about 13 years old, and I started by competing in powerlifting in the 1990s. Nutrition advice for powerlifters at the time went something like this: eat as much as you can as often as you can, even if you aren’t hungry. Normally, this was shortened to two words: eat more. I followed this advice throughout my high school years and later as I reentered the iron sports after my stint as a Marine Corps infantryman where it was pretty impractical. Given the fact that this was how I was brought up in strength training and fitness, I was naturally skeptical when I heard about intermittent fasting a few years ago. How could someone gain muscle, lose fat, and perform better by not eating? That being said, two things drove me to try it: I was broke and couldn’t afford the 8 meal a day bodybuilding diet I was doing, and I had ulcerative colitis and every time I ate I ended up running to the bathroom in excruciating pain. Since trying intermittent fasting in combination with a low carbohydrate ketogenic diet, I’ve never gone back to my old bodybuilding template. My ulcerative colitis is in remission, I have more energy throughout the day, I think better, and I have way more endurance than I ever did. I’m also stronger, leaner, and I’m able to retain muscle mass much better during fat loss training cycles. But how and why is this possible? The next few sections will take you through the reasons why and how intermittent fasting works. What is Intermittent Fasting? To begin, I want to clear the air on something. Intermittent fasting isn’t simply “not eating.” You have to eat some time, and if you don’t the result is malnutrition and event Continue reading >>

Will A Cheat Meal Knock Me Out Of Ketosis?

Will A Cheat Meal Knock Me Out Of Ketosis?

“Is a cheat day okay? The answer to your question is, if you are keto adapted. As I said before, that means that your cells essentially are running on ketones for fuel, as opposed to running on glucose, which is what the vast, vast, vast majority of Americans are running on, and therefore there’s all this disease here. The genesis of these metabolic diseases has to do with consumption of simple carbohydrates. So if you are keto adapted, and you’ve done your requisite carbohydrate depletion for 8-12 weeks, I always call this the clamp. If you were to go and eat a very, very heavy, carbohydrate-laden meal, because of the fact that you have this “clamp” if you will, if you were to go and test your blood sugars, they’re not going to shoot up to the point where you believe they may have shot up. If an individual that were not keto adapted were to eat, for example, a Snickers bar, their blood sugars may shoot up to 200 transiently. This is what we see: the blood sugars go up transiently in a keto-adapted individual and then they’re clamped right down within an hour or two to that normal level. The answer to your question is no – if you are a keto adapted individual and you are running your cells on fat, is a cheat meal going to knock you out of ketosis? No, it’s not going to knock you out of ketosis. Now, if you are an individual that is on the threshold of being in ketosis and you’re knocking your carbohydrates down – let’s say you started at 75, now you’re at 50 – and you go and eat a carbohydrate-laden meal? Yes, you’re going to have a problem. That is definitely going to delay your transition into ketosis, because what you’re doing is, you’re telling your body, “Hey! Up-regulate the enzymes that allow me to metabolize the carbohydrates Continue reading >>

The Old School ‘steak And Eggs’ Diet For Fat Loss, Balanced Energy, And Increased Testosterone

The Old School ‘steak And Eggs’ Diet For Fat Loss, Balanced Energy, And Increased Testosterone

When it comes to burning body fat simplicity is often overlooked in favor of needlessly complicated systems and plans for losing weight. People will needlessly try to count calories, mix and match several different ingredients to “activate their fat-burning” abilities, eliminate all high calorie foods, or drink nothing but juice for a week. And they end up right back where they started – with unwanted body fat! Well, I am here to tell you there is an easier way, a simpler way, and a funner way. It's called ‘Steak and Eggs‘. The Steak and Eggs diet was developed by famous bodybuilding trainer Vince Gironda as a way to burn off all excess body fat. It is the simplest diet in existence and it is one of the most effective. The Steak and Eggs diet is exactly what it sounds like – you eat Steak and Eggs, cooked in butter, and you watch the fat melt off. You eat only two meals per day: Breakfast and Supper, or Lunch and Dinner. For meal #1 you eat 3/4 lb to 1 1/2 pounds of steak and 4-6 eggs. For meal #2 you eat the exact same thing. Cook your Steak and Eggs in butter, as much butter as you want, and season with salt and pepper. Prepare your eggs any way you like, fried, scrambled, sunny side up, poached, or hard boiled. No carbohydrates, no vegetables, no other foods, no snacks, no drinks except water, black coffee and unsweetened tea. Every 6th day is a cheat day and you can eat whatever you want. Ice cream, pies, alcohol, McDonalds – nothing is off limits. That's 5 days of Steak and Eggs and one day of glorious gluttony. Repeat until lean. Isn't it hard to eat only Steak and Eggs? It is only mentally hard. Physically you feel great on this diet. Once you get past the mental aspect of eating the same thing it's as easy as going to McDonalds and ordering a #3 su Continue reading >>

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking

If you are eating a carb-restricted diet, sooner or later, no matter how much weight you've lost or how well controlled your blood sugar has become, you are going to run into the carby treat with your name on it, and when that happens, chances are you're going to eat it. What happens next may be the single most important moment in your diet. Are you going to be taken by surprise by normal physiological changes that occur? Will you start the three month binge-from-hell that leaves you wallowing in self-hatred while you pack on all the weight you lost and more? Or will you use the experience of going off-plan to strengthen your long-term diet success? The choice is up to you. Knowing What To Expect Can Keep You From Panicking When you boost your carbs above the low carbing threshold--the specific amount varies from person to person--two things will happen. You will become hungry and you will immediately gain a startling amount of weight. The reasons for your sudden weight gain are explained here. Why Carb Intake Causes Hunger Cravings The hunger is a bit more complicated, especially since it may not kick in right after you eat the carbohydrates that send you off-plan but may take a day or two to develop--when you are eating low carb again. If you experience intense hungers immediately after you eat your first carby meal, the explanation is this: After you have been low carbing for a while, your body stops producing some of the enzymes needed to digest complex starches and sugars. It takes a day or two for these to ramp back up. But in meantime, when you eat carbohydrates your blood sugar may go up a lot higher than it normally would, even if you don't usually have blood sugar problems. This is why some researchers have reported that low carbing can actually cause insulin Continue reading >>

What Happens If I Mess Up A Day On The Atkins Diet?

What Happens If I Mess Up A Day On The Atkins Diet?

Following a diet is not always easy and it requires some willpower, especially with the constant availability of tempting food. Although many people find the Atkins diet easy to follow because of the satiating power of the generous amounts of fat and protein promoted on the diet, the smell of bread or freshly baked cookies may weaken your resolve. If you exceed your allowed carbohydrate budget on one day while following the Atkins diet, you can simply get back on track the following day. Video of the Day The Atkins diet is a low-carbohydrate diet divided into four distinct phases, each with a different carbohydrate target. The first phases are more restrictive and you get slightly more freedom with your carbohydrate intake as you progress through the phases. The induction phase of the Atkins diet limits carbs to below 20 grams a day by excluding all grains, sugars, starchy vegetables, fruits, milk, yogurt and nuts. Sugar cravings can be difficult to resist during the first weeks or even after a few months, and because the amount of carbs you need to limit yourself to, it can be easy to mess up and eat too many carbs. If it happens, don't panic, but be aware of the possible short-term and long-term impacts. Eating more carbs while following a low-carb diet, such as the Atkins diet, can make you gain weight fairly quickly. The day after messing up and eating too many carbs, you may find that your weight increases by 1, 2 or even 5 pounds depending on the amount of carbs you ate. It is important to understand that this weight gain is not all fat and that a big part of it is water. When you eat a significant amount of carbs, it makes your body retain more water and this is why you can see a higher number on the scale after a carb binge. Exceeding your carb target can impact Continue reading >>

My 3 Months Journey With Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet

My 3 Months Journey With Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet

Over the past 3 months, I have been experimenting with a diet called ketogenic diet. Although it was originally developed as a cure for patient with epilepsy, ketogenic diet has been found to have many health benefits like prevent cancer, epilepsy, diabetics, increase focus and the most important, accelerate fat loss. I had heard about it many times before but never gave it a serious thought. 10 days before my experiment, I stumbled upon the work of Peter Attia and his blog, The Eating Academy. I was blown away by his story and his research on ketosis, insulin resistance, sports nutrition, performance and many more. I started reading all of his articles on ketosis and ketogenic diet, which nudged me to try the ketogenic diet myself. As you all know, this blog is all about me trying and experimenting new stuffs and sharing my experience and learning with you. So, after my long nights of research, I decided to give ketogenic diet a try. What is Ketosis and Ketogenic Diet? To people who don’t know what ketosis and ketogenic diet is, this definition would help: “The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates.” “Ketosis /kɨˈtoʊsɨs/ is a metabolic state where most of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis where blood glucose provides most of the energy” To put it simply, ketogenic diet is basically a way to get our bodies to enter into a condition known as ketosis. In this state, our liver starts to produce ketones, which in turn shifts our bodies to uses fats as the primary source of energy. While in this state Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

Did you let go of your low carb diet for the holidays? Have a free meal? Maybe a carb up? Or go out to dinner? Restaurants are well known for hiding sugar in their salad dressings and putting other carby ingredients into their food that you might not know about. What you expect to be low carb isn't always as low as you think. All it takes is a single teaspoon of sugar in the salad dressing or a light dusting of flour on that chicken breast and you'll experience the consequences without even know why! However, all is not lost! You can recover from your setback and get back into ketosis almost as fast as water fasting by following the diet plan outlined below. If you went to a Christmas party, you might not have been able to tell if your food was really free of carbs, or not. You might have not wanted to upset the host, or you didn't want to feel left out, so you ate something that wasn't on plan. Tempting Christmas treats are the downfall of many. Perhaps, you deliberately caved in to those delicious looking cupcakes or a soft, fluffy donut that your boss or co-worker brought into the office. The holidays are not the only time that your self discipline and love for low carb eating will be put to the test. Maybe you went on vacation and decided to not bother with all of that carb counting stuff. If so, you might have gained a few pounds. You also might have decided to chuck the low-carb dieting game, kick back, eat what you consider a normal diet, and just enjoy your vacation. All of that delicious food looked too good to pass up! If you work out regularly and did a carb up to improve hormonal balance by bumping up your Leptin level, you might also be wondering if there's a way to get back into ketosis more quickly than water fasting. If so, this article will help you, to Continue reading >>

Top 15 Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Diet

Top 15 Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Diet

Weight loss isn’t a linear process. If you weigh yourself every day, then there will be days where the scale goes down, other days where it goes up. It doesn’t mean that the diet isn’t working, as long as the general trend is going downwards. Many people lose a lot of weight in the first week of low-carbing, but it is mostly water weight. Weight loss will slow down significantly after that initial phase. Of course, losing weight is not the same as losing fat. It is possible, especially if you’re new to weight lifting, that you are gaining muscle at the same time that you’re losing fat. To make sure that you’re losing, use something other than just the scale (which is a big, fat liar). Use a measuring tape to measure your waist circumference and have your body fat percentage measured every month or so. Also, take pictures. Take note of how your clothes fit. If you’re looking thinner and your clothes are looser, then you ARE losing fat no matter what the scale says. Bottom Line: Weight loss isn’t linear and there’s a lot more to weight than just body fat. Be patient and use other ways of measuring than just the scale. Some people are more carb sensitive than others. If you’re eating low-carb and your weight starts to plateau, then you may want to cut back on carbs even further. In that case, go under 50 grams of carbs per day. When you go under 50 grams per day then you’re going to have to eliminate most fruits from your diet, although you can have berries in small amounts. If that doesn’t work either, going under 20 grams temporarily can work… eating just protein, healthy fats and leafy green vegetables. To make sure that you’re really eating low-carb, create a free account on Fitday and log your food intake for a while. Bottom Line: If you ar Continue reading >>

How To Re-feed Carbs On Vince Gironda’s Ketogenic Steak And Eggs Diet

How To Re-feed Carbs On Vince Gironda’s Ketogenic Steak And Eggs Diet

I was asked the following question recently on the Anaerobixx Facebook page: Hi, I learned of the steak and eggs diet from your posts. What do you have on the cheat day? Is it supposed to be something like ice cream or more like rice, french fries, etc? Cheat day or cheat meal? Vince Gironda, who came up with the steak and eggs diet suggested you either eat a high-carbohydrate MEAL every three or four days or a DAY of high-carbohydrate meals once a week. If you decide to eat a small carbohydrate meal every few days, you should probably just eat a sensible meal of pasta, rice, potatoes, etc. If you opt for a full-blown cheat day and only eat carbs once a week, which I personally do, you can go a little overboard and it won’t ruin your diet. Re-feed day or junk day? The idea behind the re-feed day is to change from the high-fat, high-protein, zero-carb macronutrient ratios that you follow during the week for a high-carb, moderate-protein, low-fat day. In general, you can eat whatever you want on your cheat day. Concentrate on eating carbohydrates and try to keep what you eat low-fat, but you don’t need to worry too much about your macronutrient ratios or how many calories you’re consuming on this one day of the week. What I’ve noticed is that the greater the caloric deficit during the week, the greater the chances that my re-feed day will turn into a junk day. Last week, for instance, I noticed that I wasn’t getting enough calories (because I was hungry all the time) so I increased my fat intake. I’m still in a caloric deficit, I’m still burning more calories than I’m eating every day, but that caloric deficit isn’t so extreme that I’m hungry and craving carbs 24 / 7 even though I’m still losing weight. As a result, my cheat day last Saturday was ver Continue reading >>

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The “rule of thumb” for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not “net”): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Fat: to satiety Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right — an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK — but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get “into” ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. I’m a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one per Continue reading >>

Getting Back Into Ketosis After Cheating

Getting Back Into Ketosis After Cheating

Falling off the ketogenic wagon never feels great – I’ve been there, done that many times. Especially in the early days. I know that feeling of being disappointed with yourself and frustration at seemingly being back at square one. In those first few months, what would happen to me is I’d have a couple of splendid weeks, where I wasn’t feeling hungry, I could feel my clothes getting looser, and everything was going well. And then, totally unexpectedly, the carb cravings would hit. I’d go through a day or two of feeling this kind of tension and ridiculously insane desire for carbs. I ‘d resist and resist until a part of my brain that didn’t seem to be me would take over, and I’d find myself stood in front of the cupboard with a piece of bread in one hand and a packet of crisps in the other. What then would follow was a 3-day binge on pretty much any carb I could get my hands on. Followed by feeling pissed at myself and fed up at having to start back at the beginning. After the fourth or fifth time of this happening, I decided I had to really figure out what was going on here. Why was I falling off the wagon and how could I make it so that this didn’t happen. Here’s what I realised: First of all, if I was living in a way which meant there was a possibility of ‘cheating’ or ‘falling off the wagon’ – that meant I was essentially on a diet. And I didn’t want to be on a diet. I wanted just to be eating in a way that felt good and satisfying and which also led to weight loss and better health. I didn’t want to be eating in order to get to a destination, I wanted to be living my life now, eating each day in a way that just brought me more and more benefits – physically, mentally and emotionally. Secondly, I wanted to be in a position where if Continue reading >>

Free Keto (ketogenic) Bodybuilding Custom Meal Planner

Free Keto (ketogenic) Bodybuilding Custom Meal Planner

Ketogenic diet is a special case of the low-carb diet. It is even lower in carb than a low carb diet which means that there are fewer low net-carb vegetables and more nuts and oils. Otherwise, the keto (ketogenic) nutritional plan is simlar to the low-carb meal. Many people are interested in keto because it does seem to work miracles for fat loss. Before we go into WHY it works lets get this standard explanation of how keto works out of the way: The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted to glucose which is transported around the body for energy. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketones which server as the energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis. Many will go on further to create complicated explanations of how keto increases the metabolic rate and amplifies the fat loss beyond what could be expected from the caloric deficit. Maybe its true, maybe its not, but honestly, I dont buy it. I do not dispute that keto is great for fat loss, I have seen its results in myself but I think the reason is a lot simpler. The simple reason keto works so well for fat loss is that it causes you to lose your carb cravings. I have a sweet tooth at a level that most would call it a psychological addiction but after two to three weeks of very low carb levels I found that even I did not crave sweets any more ... or other carbs either! Once you get in this state, no willpower is required, you simply dont need carbs and you are not hungry either. This lack of sugar cravings was nothing short of a miracle to me. A consistent caloric deficit is required week after week, month after month for a succ Continue reading >>

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

For those who follow a carb-restricted diet (low-carb, cyclical ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.), introducing a cheat day is not only a way to bring sanity into your meal plans – it is almost a requirement of sorts from a metabolic perspective to ensure that the progress with fat loss does not slow down. It is a bit hard for some people to understand how they can eat whatever they want and still get leaner – so let’s look into how and why it works. What exactly is a “cheat day”? Popularized by The 4 Hour Body book, it’s essentially cyclical strategic refeeding. You pick a day in a week (during which you would otherwise follow a restricted diet) where you allow yourself to consume copious amounts of absolutely anything you want, to your heart’s content. This concept is not new. It has been used for a while by those who followed calorie-restricted diets and allowed themselves one day per week where they would consume more calories than what they estimated their daily requirement was. As you now know, counting calories is a useless task. So we will discuss cheat days purely from the perspective of “carb refeeding”, because the assumption is that during the rest of the week you would be consuming limited amount of carbohydrates. Your total caloric intake during the day is never taken in consideration – only the ratio of different macronutrients. So, why cheat at all? There are many reasons. Pure ketogenic diets (those that strictly restrict any carbs) or diets that at least call for a significant reduction in carbs are psychologically tough. They are extremely effective in achieving the goal you might have in mind (whether it is shedding extra body fat and getting very lean, or using ketone bodies to improve energy levels, cognitive function, Continue reading >>

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