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Will Ketosis Slow Metabolism

What A Broken Metabolism Feels Like

What A Broken Metabolism Feels Like

Lost some weight doing HCG or some other very low calorie diet and now put on fat just looking at food? Your metabolism might be broken. Let's fix it... ​Every time I see someone promoting a VLCD (Very Low Calorie Diet) as a lifestyle diet I just want to slap them in the greedy little faces. We once promoted it. We tried it and lost weight. Then we slapped ourselves in the impatient faces when we finished the diet and found we would put on fat eating a f*(n salad. ​So we got fat and blamed ourselves. "Low self control," we said. Out came the whip of self loathing... Jokes. We don't do that shit. We don't hate ourselves when we try something and fail! That just doesn't help. Instead, we educate ourselves. Which is what I'm going to do here for you. Save you the 5 years of yo-yo dieting we went through... A very low calorie diet should only be done once in your life... ever. Unless you're in the first 3 months post partum, you risk permanently shutting down your metabolism by repeatedly starving yourself. If you've done a HCG diet before, then you should NEVER do it again. And if someone tells you to, especially if that someone profits from you (buying their magic woo-woo potion), run away and never buy anything from that low life, cash guzzling monster again. NOTE: This post is not about doing HCG or a low calorie diet, it's about what to do if you have done one and want to actually eat something again. ​ How to Know If Your Metabolism Is Broken​ first, let's quickly work out if your metabolism is running ineffectively... Fill in the following form: Gender MaleFemale Age Weight kglb Height cmft Submit ​Scroll down to the bottom of the results, and you'll see the following table: Your numbers will be different to the above ones, but whatever they are, you ​sho Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets May Boost Metabolism And Burn More Calories | Health.com

Low-carb Diets May Boost Metabolism And Burn More Calories | Health.com

Gaining back unwanted pounds after a period of weight loss is an all-too-common problem, and its not just about flagging willpower. Even when people follow their diet and exercise routine to a T, its not uncommon for their bodies to adapt to those missing pounds by slowing down their metabolism and burning fewer calories. This can lead to slowed progress, or even a reversal from weight loss to weight gain. Now, a new study suggests that cutting back on carbs may boost metabolism and help people burn more calories, according to new research published yesterday in BMJ. The study authors say their findings challenge the belief that all calories work the same in the bodyand suggest that the dreaded weight regain after dieting may be avoided by sticking to a low-carb eating plan. The study included 164 overweight individuals who had just lost 10 to 14% of their body weight during an initial 10-week dieting period. Those people were split into groups and were assigned to either a low-, moderate-, or high-carbohydrate diet for an additional 20 weeks. Total calorie intake in all three groups was adjusted throughout the study so that none of the participants gained or lost significant amounts of weight. Over those 20 weeks, the study authors kept track of participants energy expenditure, or the total number of calories they were burning. And they found that, at the same average body weight, those on the low-carb diet burned about 250 calories more per day than those on the high-carb diet. RELATED: You Burn the Most Calories at This Time of Day If this difference persistsand we saw no drop-off during the 20 weeks of our studythe effect would translate into about a 20-pound weight loss after three years, with no change in calorie intake," said Cara Ebbeling, PhD, co-author of the Continue reading >>

The Biggest Loser Fail And That Ketogenic Study Success

The Biggest Loser Fail And That Ketogenic Study Success

This week, splashed all over the New York Times, was an article about a paper written by Kevin Hall, a senior researcher at the National Institutes of Health. It was published in Obesity and titled “Persistent metabolic adaptation 6 years after ‘The Biggest Loser competition“. This generated a lot of hand-wringing about the futility of weight loss. NYT: After ‘The Biggest Loser,’ Their Bodies Fought to Regain Weight The study, along with another study presented by Kevin Hall seemed to generate more anxiety about the insulin hypothesis being dead. Of course, both these studies fit in perfectly with the hormonal view of obesity and reinforces once again the futility of following the Caloric Reduction as Primary approach. You could review my 50ish part series on Hormonal Obesity if you want a more in-depth view. So, let’s dive in an explain the findings of both of Dr. Hall’s excellent papers. His conclusions, well, let’s just say I don’t agree with them. The studies, though, were very well done. The Biggest Loser Let’s start with the first paper about the Biggest Loser. Essentially, what it did was follow 14 of the 16 Biggest Loser contestants. At the end of the show, they had all lost significant amounts of weight following a Eat Less, Move More approach. Contestants eat about 1000 – 1200 calories per day and exercise like mad people. What the study showed is that basal metabolism drops like a piano out of the Empire State building. It plummets. They are burning about 800 calories less per day than previously. The new paper shows that this metabolic rate does not recover even 6 years later. In other words, if you reduce your ‘Calories In’, your ‘Calories Out’ will automatically drop. This makes sense. If your body normally eats 2000 calories Continue reading >>

Ketosis Fundamentals

Ketosis Fundamentals

What is ketosis? Ketosis is the physiological state where the concentration of ketone bodies in the blood is higher than normal. This is generally agreed to be at beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentrations greater than 0.5 mM. How to achieve ketosis? Ketosis occurs either as a result of increased fat oxidation, whilst fasting or following a strict ketosis diet plan (ENDOGENOUS ketosis), or after consuming a ketone supplement (EXOGENOUS ketosis). When in a state of ketosis the body can use ketones to provide a fuel for cellular respiration instead of its usual substrates: carbohydrate, fat or protein. Why does ketosis exist? Normally, the body breaks down carbohydrates, fat, and (sometimes) proteins to provide energy. When carbohydrate is consumed in the diet, some is used immediately to maintain blood glucose levels, and the rest is stored. The hormone that signals to cells to store carbohydrate is insulin. The liver stores carbohydrate as glycogen, this is broken down and released between meals to keep blood glucose levels constant. Muscles also store glycogen, when broken down this provides fuel for exercise. Most cells in the body can switch readily between using carbohydrates and fat as fuel. Fuel used depends on substrate availability, on the energy demands of the cell and other neural and hormonal signals. The brain is different as it is dependent on carbohydrates as a fuel source. This is because fats cannot easily cross the blood-brain barrier. The inability to make use of energy within fat poses a problem during periods where there is limited carbohydrate in the diet. If blood glucose levels fall to low, brain function declines. Relatively little energy is stored as carbohydrate (2,000 kCal) compared to fat (150,000 kCal). The body's store of carbohydrates runs Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

Can You Really Fix Your Metabolism With The Keto Diet?

Can You Really Fix Your Metabolism With The Keto Diet?

The new best-selling book “The Keto Reset Diet” says it can fix a sluggish metabolism and train your body to be a fat-burning machine. Experts are skeptical. It isn’t just you. Dieting is an endless pursuit for many Americans. Around 45 million Americans go on a diet each year. And the weight eventually comes back for 33 to 66 percent of people who’ve dieted. In the New York Times best-seller “The Keto Reset Diet: Reboot Your Metabolism in 21 Days and Burn Fat Forever,” author and keto diet enthusiast Mark Sisson writes that “yo-yo dieting is severely destructive to your metabolism.” He claims that following a low-carb, high-fat diet will help “turn you into a ‘fat-burning beast’ and stay this way for the rest of your life.” The book explains that the three-week keto reset diet does this by reprograming your genes into a state of “metabolic efficiency” — which he considers burning fat, rather than being “dependent upon regular high-carbohydrate meals to sustain your energy, mood, or cognitive focus.” Critics say the science doesn’t support these claims. Does yo-yo dieting really affect your metabolism? A person’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) is largely based on their weight, but factors like age and genetics also play a role. When someone significantly restricts calories to lose weight, their body can also enter starvation mode. Their metabolism slows down considerably to conserve energy. Extremely low-calorie diets make it easier to regain weight after a diet is over. If someone with a slowed metabolism hits their target weight and celebrates by eating the same amount of daily calories a person with a typical RMR and of their same weight and age would eat, they could gain weight rapidly. Case in point: contestants from the TV show Continue reading >>

How To Reset Your Leptin Sensitivity And Master Your Metabolism

How To Reset Your Leptin Sensitivity And Master Your Metabolism

You have a “stop eating!” hormone that plays an instrumental role in your hunger and weight management, and it’s called leptin. The word leptin comes from the Greek word leptos – it means thin. It puts the brakes on hunger by sending a signal to the brain when your body’s energy needs have been met, and it controls energy expenditure over the long term. It’s that overwhelming full feeling that happens before you want to eat that second serving of sweet potatoes. A properly working leptin system leads to better metabolic performance, brain function, mental sharpness, memory, coordination and it can even affect the regulation of mood and emotion. (1) (2) But when it’s been hijacked, it can lead to obesity. The Bulletproof Diet book has a lot of info about how to control your leptin levels – the rest of this post is about how to reset your leptin sensitivity if you think it’s gone awry. The book also talks about ghrelin, which gets broken before leptin fails. (BTW, this is one of the several reasons Bulletproof Coffee profoundly turns off hunger…it’s easier to hack ghrelin than leptin.) What is leptin and how does it work? Fat cells produce leptin in proportion to body-fat levels: the more fat you have, the more it makes leptin. It enters the bloodstream via your circulatory system. Leptin binds to protein in the blood, and when leptin reaches capillaries in the brain, it travels across the blood-brain barrier, binding to leptin receptors on the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Leptin lets your hypothalamus know when it’s time for you to stop eating, then it increases your metabolic rate in order to achieve energy balance (known as homeostasis). (3) (4) (5) Conversely, leptin also tells us when to eat – when you have less body fat, less leptin Continue reading >>

How A High-fat Diet Could Slow Down Your Metabolism

How A High-fat Diet Could Slow Down Your Metabolism

Do you want to lose weight, build muscle, or feel more fit? Join Beachbody On Demand, and get unlimited access to Beachbody’s world-famous programs, including 21 Day FIX®, CORE DE FORCE®, and P90X®. Don’t miss out on your chance for amazing results. Sign up today! Before you head to the buffet line and pile mac-n-cheese and hot dogs on your plate for the third night in a row, take a moment to read this. A new study in the journal Obesity found it took only five days for your body to feel the effects of a high-fat diet, and potentially impact your metabolism. Researchers placed 12 healthy, young men on a 30% fat diet (the Institute of Medicine recommends fat should comprise anywhere between 20 and 35% of your diet). After a week, they moved the participants to a high-fat diet. Half of the individuals received 55% of calories from fat, while the other group received 63% of their calories from fat. To test the results of this sudden change, scientists took muscle biopsies before and after the experiment. After five days of eating macaroni and cheese, ham and cheese sandwiches with butter, and frozen dinners, the subjects’ metabolisms took a turn for the worse. “The normal response to a meal was essentially either blunted or just not there after five days of high-fat feeding,” said study author Matthew W. Hulver, PhD, Department Head of Human Nutrition, Food, and Exercise at Virginia Tech. Normally when you eat, your body converts the carbs you consume to glucose (blood sugar), which is then delivered to cells via a hormone called insulin. In the cells, the glucose is converted into energy. When you consume too much sugar, your cells can start to reject insulin. This is called insulin insensitivity or insulin resistance. It causes an excess of blood sugar and o Continue reading >>

How To Fix Your Broken Metabolism By Doing The Exact Opposite

How To Fix Your Broken Metabolism By Doing The Exact Opposite

We saw last week with the Biggest Loser study that basal metabolism plummets when you lose weight with calorie reduction. As contestants lose weight, they burn a lot less energy – up to 800 calories per day less than before. Some of that is expected, since there is less body tissue to maintain, but nevertheless, these contestants burn far less than expected even taking this into account. Even 6 years later, their basal metabolic rate (BMR) remains depressed, as do the contestants themselves. The story got a lot of coverage, but one thing was consistently missing. How to fix it.That’s what I’ll show you today, and it’s the opposite of what most people expect. So, let’s think about this problem in the context of the 2 compartment model of obesity that we have used before. There are two compartments for body energy. We take calories in as food. This gets stored in the short term as glycogen, or long term as body fat. Glycogen is easily converted to energy (calories out), but body fat, not so much. So we can consider the analogous situation where short term energy is stored in a refrigerator and long term in the basement freezer. Insulin’s role is to direct food into the basement freezer. When there is excess food that can’t be kept in the fridge, insulin directs it to the freezer. This is body fat and manufactured in the liver by the process of de novo lipogenesis. What causes insulin levels to be elevated depends partly on the foods we eat, but also by insulin resistance. Fructose, for example, plays a key role in elevating insulin resistance which will, in turn raise insulin levels. Insulin resistance leads to high insulin levels, which leads to higher resistance in a vicious cycle. That is, it can be self sustaining. So during weight loss, if we don’t ad Continue reading >>

Do Calories Matter On A Keto Diet?

Do Calories Matter On A Keto Diet?

Before it became a mainstream diet and lifestyle, the ketogenic diet was (and still is) used to treat epilepsy in children. Now, its used for weight loss and a slew of other health-related conditions. The ketogenic diet induces a state of ketosis , meaning blood levels of ketones are elevated. This occurs due to carbohydrate restriction, which causes the body to burn fat and from this, produce ketone bodies. Now, you can find keto products on shelves everywhere, ranging from keto cookies to keto protein powders, which can be consumed guilt-free on a ketogenic diet. Or can they? Many advocates of keto claim that you dont have to count calories on the diet. This is a bit of a simplistic conclusion. Just like refined and junk food can be over consumed, so too can so-called healthy keto-friendly foods and other keto-friendly productsthe ketogenic diet probably just makes you less likely to overeat them. So, do calories matter on keto? Lets take a look. While the term calories is associated with food, theyre actually a measurement of heat. In technical terms, one calorie (kCal) is the amount of energy needed to heat one kilogram of water by one degree Celsius. Measuring energy in calories is a way that food scientists have developed to quantify the amount of energy present in foods. Foods contain varying amounts of energy stored in their atomic bonds. When the bonds are broken down, this energy is released (as heat). Each macronutrientcarbohydrates, protein, and fathave different calorie contents due to the energy they contain. For instance, one gram of protein and carbohydrate each contain four calories, while one gram of fat contains nine calories; this is called their physiological fuel value. Traditional weight loss models basically all follow the same simple premisetha Continue reading >>

Metabolic Damage And Keto Adaptation – Why And How.

Metabolic Damage And Keto Adaptation – Why And How.

I have been getting questions about how to keto adapt, and how long does keto adaption take etc. and does keeping calories up while keto dieting, does this reduce metabolic damage or adaptation even if your carbs are very low? So what this question is kind of centering on is the concept about metabolic damage and adaptation. My take is that your body becomes very efficient at burning calories when you drive your calories lower and lower and do more and more steady state cardio. I’m not talking about 1 or 2 – 45 min cardio sessions a week, I’m talking more about one or two hours of cardio per day. So this is a high amount of cardio and very low calories. Essentially what you’re doing is you’re just kind of metabolically shocking your system and your body responds by becoming a lot more efficient. Now these mechanisms of efficiency are starting to get studied in the scientific world but that’s basically kind of what we are talking about. Right now there isn’t much evidence, but they do believe something is there. The basis of these adaptations is definitely present. So how this does relate specifically to a ketogenic diet, and you know because your carbs are really low, can you still keep your calories high so you don’t get these metabolic adaptations. And the answer is yes. So what about ketosis? Let’s Get Scientific for a Moment This is a really important key to remember, ketosis is not weight loss, instead ketosis is actually a metabolic state when fat is being burned as your primary fuel source and then ketones are being produced. Ketones are by products of fat metabolism. Fat is getting oxidized at a very high rate, which results in ketone production and then you can measure ketones in either your urine (not recommended as I discuss here in my TOP K Continue reading >>

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

If you're looking for the trendiest diet since Paleo, this might be it—only with more fat, way less protein, and virtually zero carbs. The ketogenic diet, which has reportedly been used by celebs like Kim Kardashian and NBA player Lebron James, is a high-fat, low-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that was originally developed to treat epilepsy in children (experts can't say for sure why it reduces the frequency of seizures, but it does seem to work). The whole diet is based on a process called ketosis, which is when your body is so depleted of carbs that your liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies, which can be used as energy, says Tracy A. Siegfried, M.D., medical director at The N.E.W. Program, a bariatric and metabolic weight-loss center in California. The ketones replace carbohydrates as your body’s main energy source, meaning you are running on (and burning) fat. To tell if your body is in a state of ketosis, you can measure your blood or urine for elevated levels of ketones (Ketostix, used to test keto-dieters ketone levels, are available at many pharmacies). If this sounds familiar, it's probably because ketosis is also the goal of the first stage of the Atkins diet. But unlike the keto diet, the Atkins diet aims to get you into a mild state of ketosis and allows for more carbohydrates. In other words, keto is more hardcore. So What the Heck Do You Eat? To get your body to reach ketosis, 80 to 90 percent of the calories you consume should come from fat, and the rest should come from a combo of protein and carbs, says Siegfried. Plus, your carb intake is limited to 10 to 35 grams per day. That's roughly the amount in a single apple, glass of milk, or piece of bread. In fact, it's pretty much impossible to eat fruit or milk-based products without su Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Keto: Why Youre Not Losing Weight On A Ketogenic Diet

Troubleshooting Keto: Why Youre Not Losing Weight On A Ketogenic Diet

Troubleshooting Keto: Why Youre Not Losing Weight on a Ketogenic Diet If you started a keto diet for weight loss, you probably heardthat ketosis is great for slimming down. A lot of articles on keto and weight loss claim that when youre on a keto diet: You can eat until youre full and still lose weight Your sugar and carb cravings will disappear Your body will switch into fat-burning mode The above claims are all rooted in truth, but theyre a little sensationalized. If you take them at face value, you may not meet your goals, even if youre in ketosis all the time. If that's happening, you're probably pretty frustrated. Hopefully this article will help. The good news is that keto truly is great for weight loss, and with a few changes, you can start to burn body fat and lose weight on keto. You'll just have to restructure your diet a bit. Here are three common myths about the keto diet, as well as a practical guide to weight loss on keto. Myth #1: You dont have to count calories on keto Some proponents of keto claim that calories dont matter when youre in ketosis, or that you can eat as much butter and bacon as you want and youll still lose weight. To be clear: calories matter on keto. Calories always matter. Conceptually, weight loss is simple. You burn a certain number of calories a day. If you eat more calories thanyou burn, youll gain weight. If you eat fewer calories thanyou burn, youll lose weight. This rule is inescapable, and its as true for keto as it is for any other diet. The good news: While calories do matter, not all calories are created equal. Keto makes it much more comfortable to be in a calorie deficit than most other diets do. Keto diets suppress your appetite by blocking ghrelin, your bodys main hunger hormone[ * ]. Recent research suggests that ghrel Continue reading >>

If You've Been Considering The Keto Diet, This Might Change Your Mind

If You've Been Considering The Keto Diet, This Might Change Your Mind

The keto diet is gaining in popularity, but it's also "a dietitian's nightmare," Lisa Eberly said. We chatted with the registered dietitian to get her expert opinion on the trendy diet we've been hearing so much about. Spoiler alert: she's not into it. What Is a Keto Diet? A keto — short for ketogenic — diet is a low-carb diet, in which the body produces ketones in the liver to use as energy in lieu of carbohydrates (more on that later). Like other low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diets, keto draws people in with its promised weight-loss results. Blogs, Pinterest, and Instagram have been lighting up with "keto recipes" and meal plans, but that doesn't mean it's actually good for you. "When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin," Lisa explained. Glucose and insulin, at proper levels, are used for energy — they're also essential for a healthy, balanced body. But it's all about balance — too many carbohydrates can be detrimental. "Your body's production of glucose and insulin can become abnormal, leading to health problems, poor food cravings, and weight gain." But, she said, "that does not mean that the answer is to eliminate [or significantly reduce] them." How Does the Keto Diet Work? Lisa put it pretty simply: a ketogenic diet mimics starvation. The starvation effect causes the body to go into a metabolic state called "ketosis." In our normal state, human bodies are sugar-driven: we eat carbohydrates, carbs are broken down into glucose, and glucose usually becomes energy, or it's stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When you deprive your body of essential carbohydrate intake (Lisa noted that this is anything under 50 grams per day), then the liver goes into overdrive, because you don't have that carbohydrate-made glucose Continue reading >>

Avoid These 7 Metabolism Mistakes To Lose Weight

Avoid These 7 Metabolism Mistakes To Lose Weight

Avoid these 7 Metabolism Mistakes to Lose Weight A slow metabolism can be the death of weight loss. Here are 7 mistakes you could be making right now that stand in the way of your body burning calories. Make sure you avoid these metabolism killers! Your metabolism is the engine that keeps your body running. It turns calories into fuel. There are ways to boost your metabolism but what about mistakes and habits that slow it down? You may be killing your metabolism without even knowing! WHAT CAUSES METABOLIC DAMAGE? HERE ARE 7 CAUSES: One way to kill your metabolism is by not eating enough food. While a calorie deficit is necessary for weight loss, countless people make the mistake of trying to lose fat too quickly by being overly-aggressive with their calorie restriction. This, in turn, causes their body to respond aggressively in opposition. Your body has an inbuilt protection mechanism whereby it acts to conserve energy when it senses a drop in energy intake. Your body needs calories to get energy and if you dont eat enough for your body to simply function or you are depriving yourself, your body will slow down your metabolism and start to break down calorie-burning muscle. Ultimately your body starts burning fewer calories which is the opposite of what you want if your goal is to lose weight. Starving yourself to lose a few pounds, binging then starving and binging again can be a vicious cycle. Your metabolism is wondering what in the world is going on and goes into survival mode. This means it is storing calories as fat instead of burning them. Its Better To Burn The Calories Off Than To Starve Them Off Also, note that calorie deficit does not necessarily need to come from a calorie restriction only. A good amount of contribution should come from exercise. You all kn Continue reading >>

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