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Will Fruit Ruin Ketosis

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

Last week, my staff nutritionist Laura Schoenfeld wrote a guest post for my blog called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health”. Perhaps not surprisingly, it has caused quite a stir. For reasons I don’t fully understand, some people identify so strongly with how many carbohydrates they eat that they take offense when a suggestion is made that low-carb diets may not be appropriate for everyone, in all circumstances. In these circles low-carb diets have become dogma (i.e. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true). Followers of this strange religious sect insist that everyone should be on low-carb or even ketogenic diets; that all carbohydrates, regardless of their source, are “toxic”; that most traditional hunter-gatherer (e.g. Paleolithic) societies followed a low-carb diet; and, similarly, that nutritional ketosis—which is only achievable with a very high-fat, low-carb, and low-protein diet—is our default and optimal physiological state. Cut through the confusion and hype and learn what research can tell us about low-carb diets. On the other hand, I’ve also observed somewhat of a backlash against low-carb diets occurring in the blogosphere of late. While I agree with many of the potential issues that have been raised about low-carb diets, and think it’s important to discuss them, I also feel it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that low-carb diets can be very effective therapeutic tools for certain conditions and in certain situations. With this in mind, here are 7 things I think everyone should know about low-carb diets. #1: Paleo does not equal low-carb, and very low-carb/ketogenic diets are not our “default” nutritional state, as some have claimed. Some low-carb advocates have claimed that mo Continue reading >>

Fruit On The Ketogenic Diet

Fruit On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is a low-carbohydrate diet used as a form of treatment for seizures, as well as a diet to promote weight loss. The premise of the diet is to get you in a state of ketosis so that your body uses its own fat cells for energy, instead of glucose. As all-carb foods, fruits aren't a major part of the ketogenic diet, but that doesn't mean you need to cut them out completely. You should, however, be extra cautious about how much fruit you eat. If you're not sure how fruit might fit into your ketogenic diet, consult your doctor or a registered dietitian for help. Video of the Day The ketogenic diet uses a ratio of fat to carbs to determine the amount of carbs you're allowed to have on the plan. Generally, the ratio is 3 to 4 grams of fat to every 1 gram of carb. For example, if you're following a 1,200 calorie diet, you'd be limited to about 9 to 10 grams of carbs a day, with the rest of the calories coming from fat and protein. Your doctor or dietitian determines the number of calories and carbs you need on your ketogenic diet. Although fruits are low in calories and rich in vitamins and minerals, all the calories come from carbs. The amount of carbohydrates in fruit varies, but a typical serving, which ranges from 1/2 to 1 cup, contains about 15 grams. Being limited to no more than 10 grams of carbs a day on your ketogenic diet doesn't leave you much room for carb-heavy fruit. But you may be able to fit in some fruit on occasion if you choose those with fewer carbs per serving and are careful when measuring. Lower carb fruit options include rhubarb, peaches, casaba melon, starfruit, grapefruit and watermelon. One cup, or 122 grams, of raw rhubarb has 5.5 grams of carbs; 1 cup of sliced starfruit, which is 108 grams, has 7.3 grams of carbs; and 1/2 cup of cu Continue reading >>

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The “rule of thumb” for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not “net”): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Fat: to satiety Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right — an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK — but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get “into” ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. I’m a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one per Continue reading >>

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

For those who follow a carb-restricted diet (low-carb, cyclical ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.), introducing a cheat day is not only a way to bring sanity into your meal plans – it is almost a requirement of sorts from a metabolic perspective to ensure that the progress with fat loss does not slow down. It is a bit hard for some people to understand how they can eat whatever they want and still get leaner – so let’s look into how and why it works. What exactly is a “cheat day”? Popularized by The 4 Hour Body book, it’s essentially cyclical strategic refeeding. You pick a day in a week (during which you would otherwise follow a restricted diet) where you allow yourself to consume copious amounts of absolutely anything you want, to your heart’s content. This concept is not new. It has been used for a while by those who followed calorie-restricted diets and allowed themselves one day per week where they would consume more calories than what they estimated their daily requirement was. As you now know, counting calories is a useless task. So we will discuss cheat days purely from the perspective of “carb refeeding”, because the assumption is that during the rest of the week you would be consuming limited amount of carbohydrates. Your total caloric intake during the day is never taken in consideration – only the ratio of different macronutrients. So, why cheat at all? There are many reasons. Pure ketogenic diets (those that strictly restrict any carbs) or diets that at least call for a significant reduction in carbs are psychologically tough. They are extremely effective in achieving the goal you might have in mind (whether it is shedding extra body fat and getting very lean, or using ketone bodies to improve energy levels, cognitive function, Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

59 Keto Snacks The Tastiest Low Carb List For Ketogenic Diets

59 Keto Snacks The Tastiest Low Carb List For Ketogenic Diets

Having a variety of quick and easy keto snacks nearby will ensure you’re always full of energy while on the go, keeping you in that optimal fat burning state called ketosis. For those times when you’re not quite up for a full meal, or you just want something at your desk or in your bag, we’ve made a list of keto snacks that we eat to fit right into your ketogenic diet. They’ll fit in with an Atkins Diet, Banting and many for Paleo also Keto Snacks that You Can Buy Followed by Ketogenic Snacks Recipes that you can make Sugar-Free Chocolate– Who doesn’t love chocolate? Well you don’t have to miss out on a ketogenic diet, if you select carefully. Buy it now Choc Zero Premium milk chocolate has 4.5g of fat no added sugar and no sugar alcohols with only 1 net carb per piece, the perfect keto snack to have on hand. Get Choc Zero Now Chocolate Nut Clustersthese tasty little morsels have less than 1g net carbs (in fact 0.3g of net carbs) No Sugar, Gluten Free and All Natural. Get your Chocolate Nut Clusters Here. ChocoPerfection Sixty Dark Bars– How good are these, another 1 net carb keto snack, just check out the review in the links they’ll curb those cravings for sure. Buy it Now Jerky – A quick and easy snack, just be sure to have some extra fat with them such as butter, cheese or a fatty dip and avoid the high carb brands that use sugar. Buy it now Pepperoni Sticks – A little spicy, very low carb and high in fat. These delicious low carb snacks are a great and convenient way to stay in ketosis and curb that hunger. Buy them now Sugar Free Nut Spreads – Most nut spreads would be very nutritious if they didn’t add sugar to them. There are some companies that understand this and make some great natural nut butters. Buy now Brasil Nuts – Brasil nuts Continue reading >>

Best Low-carb Fruits (and Which To Avoid)

Best Low-carb Fruits (and Which To Avoid)

Can you eat fruit on a ketogenic diet? In short, it’s best to avoid most fruits except for berries, which you can eat in moderation. Below, we’ll take a look at some of the fruits you can eat on a low carb diet and what you should avoid. When people switch to a ketogenic diet, fruit can be an area of confusion. Fruit has been marketed as healthy for many years and generally has a positive stigma behind it. While some fruit can be healthy in moderation, on a ketogenic diet we aim to keep our carbohydrates restricted to under 30g per day. In most cases, one piece of fruit would be the majority of the carbohydrate intake for the day. Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit that we intake each day. This usually makes berries (notably raspberries and blackberries) the fruit of choice for anyone on a ketogenic diet. If you’re having trouble with what type of foods to eat, make sure you check out our in-depth keto food list > As a general rule of thumb, avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they will have too many sugars for a ketogenic diet. Common Fruit and Their Carb Counts If you’re on a low-carb, ketogenic diet and want to indulge in some fruit occasionally, that’s no problem at all. Try to stick with berries and lower carb fruit that can fit within your macro ranges. Remember that you want to stick to 30g or less carbohydrate intake per day. Some people may argue that you have to eat fruit to be healthy. This is not the case. The ketogenic diet allows for a good amount of vegetables to be eaten. You can easily get any nutrient from vegetables that you can from fruits, except with a significantly lower amount of sugar. While a sweet treat may be desired once in a while, there really is Continue reading >>

The Truth About Fruit

The Truth About Fruit

Fruit is nature’s candy. Naturally sweet and juicy, it’s a dietary favorite and a pretty big staple in Western culture. Most fruit is also decidedly not keto-friendly. But why? We get that question over and over. After all, isn’t the sugar in fruit “natural?” Doesn’t it have tons of fiber? The answer those questions are yes, and it depends on the fruit, respectively. But those answers do not necessarily make for a keto-friendly food. Remember, sugar itself is completely natural. Regular old table sugar is usually derived from the juice of the sugar cane or sugar beet. It’s essentially juice that’s been clarified and dried into crystals. Perfectly natural. Still not keto. The big disconnect seems to be in the commonly held notion that fructose, what we call “fruit sugar,” is somehow better for you than regular table sugar? But is that so? There does seem to be some scientific evidence that fructose is metabolized differently. It is not readily used by most cells in the rest of the body and so it is primarily processed by the liver instead. There also seems to be no blood glucose or insulin response from fructose. All of this would seem to add up to fruit being friendly. Not so fast. The problems with fruit are two-fold. First, as any diabetic who tests regularly will tell you, they do see an increase in blood glucose after eating fruit. Increases in insulin response follow increases in blood glucose, both of which we try to keep low on keto. Second, there is scientific evidence that increased fructose consumption not only leads to weight gain, occurring primarily in visceral belly fat, but has other, very serious adverse health consequences. Let’s take them one at a time. Blood glucose increases after consuming fruit It does seem to be true that fru Continue reading >>

How To Burn Stored Body Fat — A Ketosis Primer

How To Burn Stored Body Fat — A Ketosis Primer

“So, how do you tell your body to start burning stored body fat?” my friend and fellow mother asked. “Cut the carbs,” answered another mom. “I go into ketosis just about every afternoon.” “Ketosis? Isn’t that bad for you?” The short answer? No. I talk to a lot of people who want to lose weight. They try all sorts of things — exercise, calorie restriction, you name it. Sometimes, they lose the weight. Inevitably, they gain it back. That’s because what they’re doing is going on a diet — a temporary fix at best. What they need is a lifestyle change, a perspective shift, a new paradigm. Of course, you all know the paradigm I espouse — a conversion to eating real, traditional foods. Yet even a conversion to eating real food won’t necessarily help the pounds melt away. If you’re still eating 200 grams of carbohydrates a day — even if they’re “traditional” carbohydrates like sprouted or soaked grains, unrefined sweeteners, etc, you’re not going to lose weight without making some serious changes. If your body is regularly storing body fat (you gain a little bit of weight each year), then something is wrong with how your body metabolizes food. Let me introduce you to a new concept: the body fat setpoint. The body fat setpoint is the mass of body fat that your body attempts to defend against changes in either direction. It’s your body’s attempt to maintain homeostasis. This is why if you exercise more, you eat more. It’s also why if you restrict calories, your metabolism slows down to compensate. Why should you care about the body fat setpoint? From Stephan at Whole Health Source: We care because this has some very important implications for human obesity. With such a powerful system in place to keep body fat mass in a narrow range, Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Your Ketogenic diet is going great! You’re losing weight, feeling better, and your prepared for a healthy life in Ketosis! Only problem is when you go to tell anyone about your diet they get a look of disgust and cover their nose. You ask a friend what he thinks the issue might be, and he only has one thing to say: “Ketosis Breath.” Ketosis Breath is an unfortunate side effect that befalls many Keto dieters. The important thing to remember is that it’s not just you, and it isn’t forever. There’s also an explanation and a solution for it. Why does Ketosis Breath happen? The Ketogenic diet is predicated on your body using fat as fuel instead of carbs. As you know, when your body begins to use fat as fuel, it releases Ketones into your bloodstream. Physicians suspect that the Ketosis breath comes from one of the Ketones know as Acetone. Acetone on your breath can manifest itself in a fruity, or rotten fruit smell. You have to remember, Acetone is the same chemical that’s in Nail Polish remover, which isn’t known for it’s amazing smell. The good news is that Ketosis means you’re hitting your dietary needs. The bad news is that you’re not getting a date any time soon. Just kidding, you’ll get dates just fine. Below we’ve listed out ways to deal with Ketosis breath. The wrong ones and the right ones. The Wrong Way to deal with Ketosis Breath A common reaction to having bad breath is to go to the nearest store and buy some breath freshening gum to mask the scent. No harm no foul, right? Well not exactly. Since you’re on the Ketogenic diet, you have to be aware of which brands of gum you’re going to chomp into. The same brands that produce the sugar spiked candy that we steer clear of produce some of the most popular breath enhancing gums on the ma Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

Update: I did a (failed) ketosis experiment on myself that you can read about here, here, here, and here. Jimmy Moore is dropping weight with the fervor of a college wrestler right now on his experimental ketogenic diet. In fact, he’s lost about 47 pounds in the last 3 months, and he’s still going. He’s an awesome guy and he’s been struggling with his weight for a while now, so I’m psyched for him to say the least. He gives updates every month or so on his progress, but he never tells his readers exactly WHAT he’s eating. I’m itching to know. Now, Jimmy isn’t strictly Paleo: he eats full fat dairy, so even if he did report to us what he was eating, it wouldn’t be super helpful to a lot of people. I got to thinking what a ketogenic Paleo diet might look like. Without all that cheese and cream to assume the fat positions, it’d require a lot more tallow, lard, coconut oil, and coconut milk, as well as the fatty meats, eggs, nuts, and avocados. Here’s a picture of one of Jimmy’s meals to give you an idea of the amount of dairy he’s eating (well, at least at this particular meal). I think that’s sausage, avocado, scrambled eggs, some sort of hot sauce, and heavy cream. By the way, I’m in no way criticizing Jimmy right now. If I could eat dairy, I probably would, and I think this meal looks amazing. What’s ketosis? Before I go any further with this, I’ll briefly explain what ketogenic means and why one would aspire to be on a ketogenic diet. Some say you need to eat fewer than 30 grams of carbs per day to be in ketosis. It may be fewer than that to get into a deep state of ketosis, and you must not eat too much protein either. So a ketogenic diet is high fat, low(ish) protein, and very low carb. More on that in a moment. When you are in ketos Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

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