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Will Fruit Ruin Ketosis

A Guide To Low-carb & Keto Cheating

A Guide To Low-carb & Keto Cheating

To cheat or not to cheat? That is the eternal question. Almost everyone is occasionally tempted – are you? This five-part guide will help you think through low-carb cheating… and if you do decide to cheat, it will help you do it smarter. 1. Bad and Less Bad Reasons to Cheat Why cheat? Some reasons are better than others. Bad reasons Politeness or wanting to fit in Aunt Martha will get over it when you skip her gooey dessert. Your dining companion’s surprise when you swap out potatoes for extra veggies is typically fleeting. Don’t overplay others’ interest or investment in your personal dietary choices. Remember, people are usually wrapped up in their own experience and quickly move on from yours. However, some people do get overly curious about your food choices. When that happens, be ready with a line like, “I’m sorry, I have a sensitive stomach.” Impulsivity An impulsive reach into that bowl of candy is an unsatisfying cheat. A last minute decision to eat a few of those cold French fries on your kid’s plate is rarely that satisfying. Planned cheating can empower – random cheating undermines. Be true to yourself and stick to your cheating plan. Bad Planning Grabbing a mediocre two-day-old sandwich from a gas station is a wasted cheat. Anything worth cheating on yourself for is, by definition, delicious. That stale sandwich is not. Keep quality low-carb emergency food in your car, purse, or briefcase so you never cheat because you are starving. For tips about on-the-go low-carb foods, check out our travel guide. For great snack ideas, check out our low-carb snack guide. For how to eat at restaurants and eateries, check out “How to Eat Low-Carb When Dining Out”. Less bad reasons To stick with low-carb long term A low-carb lifestyle lasts forever Continue reading >>

22 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

22 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

A ketogenic diet is a low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat nutrition plan. This article addresses some of the best foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. Following a ketogenic diet has been effectively shown to improve cardiovascular health, regulate the endocrine system, stabilize blood glucose levels, support weight loss, improve insulin sensitivity in people with type-2 diabetes and even treat neurological dysfunction (8, 9). Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance. Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis. One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods. So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy. Here are 22 foods to eat on a ketogenic diet that you will LOVE! 1. Lemons & Limes: Most citrus fruits are packed with sugar. Lemons and limes however offer you the pleasure of a low-glycemic fruit to enjoy regularly and are rich in anti-inflammatory nutrients like citric acid, vitamin C and bioflavonoids. (1) Citric acid helps stabilize blood sugar levels and combat the inflammatory effects of sugar while also serving as an alkalizing agents for the body. Lemons and limes are some of the best foods you can use daily to help detoxify the gastrointestinal tract because of their natural antiseptic properties. Add a fresh squeeze of lemon or lime to your water throughout the day and use in many food preparations such as meat marinades and dressings. 2. Herbs: Herbs pact some of the most powerful antioxidants. Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbl Continue reading >>

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Is the ketogenic diet healthy? We’re going to let you in on a little secret. Most popular healthy diets that are touted for weight loss—from Paleo to Mediterranean and vegetarian—share many of the same basic principles. All involve eating whole foods (as opposed to packaged and processed) and filling your plate with quality sources of protein, healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, and vitamin-, mineral-, and fiber-rich vegetables. (Again, we’re talking about the ones that fall somewhere on the healthy spectrum, not unhealthy fad diets like, ahem, the Grapefruit Diet.) However, each proposes a slightly different path that leads to fulfilling those principles. In this column, we’ll be breaking them down for you one by one so you can figure out which (if any!) is right for you. We’ll quickly explain the facts and then provide quick, actionable tips on how to follow the diet as part of a Nutritious Life. The Ketogenic Diet: What It Is The ketogenic diet is like Atkins amplified. Instead of just low-carb, it’s “almost no carb” and lots of fat. It’s been around for a long time but has recently gotten a lot of attention. Originally developed to treat children with epilepsy, the ketogenic diet restricts carb intake to as low as two to four percent of calories, with a 4:1 ratio of fat to carbs and protein combined. (For comparison, standard diets contain about 45 to 65 percent of calories from carbs; we generally recommend sticking to the lower end of that spectrum and avoiding refined carbs.) The goal of eating this way is to move the body into a state called ketosis. During ketosis, instead of breaking down carbs (there are none!) into glucose for fuel, the liver converts fat into ketone bodies, which become the body’s primary source of energy. Advocates s Continue reading >>

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

For those who follow a carb-restricted diet (low-carb, cyclical ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.), introducing a cheat day is not only a way to bring sanity into your meal plans – it is almost a requirement of sorts from a metabolic perspective to ensure that the progress with fat loss does not slow down. It is a bit hard for some people to understand how they can eat whatever they want and still get leaner – so let’s look into how and why it works. What exactly is a “cheat day”? Popularized by The 4 Hour Body book, it’s essentially cyclical strategic refeeding. You pick a day in a week (during which you would otherwise follow a restricted diet) where you allow yourself to consume copious amounts of absolutely anything you want, to your heart’s content. This concept is not new. It has been used for a while by those who followed calorie-restricted diets and allowed themselves one day per week where they would consume more calories than what they estimated their daily requirement was. As you now know, counting calories is a useless task. So we will discuss cheat days purely from the perspective of “carb refeeding”, because the assumption is that during the rest of the week you would be consuming limited amount of carbohydrates. Your total caloric intake during the day is never taken in consideration – only the ratio of different macronutrients. So, why cheat at all? There are many reasons. Pure ketogenic diets (those that strictly restrict any carbs) or diets that at least call for a significant reduction in carbs are psychologically tough. They are extremely effective in achieving the goal you might have in mind (whether it is shedding extra body fat and getting very lean, or using ketone bodies to improve energy levels, cognitive function, Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

59 Keto Snacks The Tastiest Low Carb List For Ketogenic Diets

59 Keto Snacks The Tastiest Low Carb List For Ketogenic Diets

Having a variety of quick and easy keto snacks nearby will ensure you’re always full of energy while on the go, keeping you in that optimal fat burning state called ketosis. For those times when you’re not quite up for a full meal, or you just want something at your desk or in your bag, we’ve made a list of keto snacks that we eat to fit right into your ketogenic diet. They’ll fit in with an Atkins Diet, Banting and many for Paleo also Keto Snacks that You Can Buy Followed by Ketogenic Snacks Recipes that you can make Sugar-Free Chocolate– Who doesn’t love chocolate? Well you don’t have to miss out on a ketogenic diet, if you select carefully. Buy it now Choc Zero Premium milk chocolate has 4.5g of fat no added sugar and no sugar alcohols with only 1 net carb per piece, the perfect keto snack to have on hand. Get Choc Zero Now Chocolate Nut Clustersthese tasty little morsels have less than 1g net carbs (in fact 0.3g of net carbs) No Sugar, Gluten Free and All Natural. Get your Chocolate Nut Clusters Here. ChocoPerfection Sixty Dark Bars– How good are these, another 1 net carb keto snack, just check out the review in the links they’ll curb those cravings for sure. Buy it Now Jerky – A quick and easy snack, just be sure to have some extra fat with them such as butter, cheese or a fatty dip and avoid the high carb brands that use sugar. Buy it now Pepperoni Sticks – A little spicy, very low carb and high in fat. These delicious low carb snacks are a great and convenient way to stay in ketosis and curb that hunger. Buy them now Sugar Free Nut Spreads – Most nut spreads would be very nutritious if they didn’t add sugar to them. There are some companies that understand this and make some great natural nut butters. Buy now Brasil Nuts – Brasil nuts Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

Did you let go of your low carb diet for the holidays? Have a free meal? Maybe a carb up? Or go out to dinner? Restaurants are well known for hiding sugar in their salad dressings and putting other carby ingredients into their food that you might not know about. What you expect to be low carb isn't always as low as you think. All it takes is a single teaspoon of sugar in the salad dressing or a light dusting of flour on that chicken breast and you'll experience the consequences without even know why! However, all is not lost! You can recover from your setback and get back into ketosis almost as fast as water fasting by following the diet plan outlined below. If you went to a Christmas party, you might not have been able to tell if your food was really free of carbs, or not. You might have not wanted to upset the host, or you didn't want to feel left out, so you ate something that wasn't on plan. Tempting Christmas treats are the downfall of many. Perhaps, you deliberately caved in to those delicious looking cupcakes or a soft, fluffy donut that your boss or co-worker brought into the office. The holidays are not the only time that your self discipline and love for low carb eating will be put to the test. Maybe you went on vacation and decided to not bother with all of that carb counting stuff. If so, you might have gained a few pounds. You also might have decided to chuck the low-carb dieting game, kick back, eat what you consider a normal diet, and just enjoy your vacation. All of that delicious food looked too good to pass up! If you work out regularly and did a carb up to improve hormonal balance by bumping up your Leptin level, you might also be wondering if there's a way to get back into ketosis more quickly than water fasting. If so, this article will help you, to Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

Note: Please note that if you are interested in a Ketogenic Diet used to treat Epilepsy or Pediatric Epilepsy, please start at Johns Hopkins who are the pioneers in this field. The wikipedia page for the Ketogenic Diet diet also has information on the diet as it relates to treating epilepsy. The diet below is simply for rapid and effective weight loss and uses a 1 to 1 fat to protein ratio rather than the 4 to 1 fat to combined protein and carbs ratio of the Ketogenic Diet pioneered by Johns Hopkins used to treat epilepsy. [wp_ad_camp_3] Disclaimer: I am neither a doctor nor self proclaimed nutrition expert so please consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any action that affects your health and wellbeing. After finishing Gary Taubes latest book, which seems to have rapidly become the cornerstone of a new approach to nutrition, I’ve become very interested in the Ketogenic diet. The speed of weight loss I’ve seen is incredible and my energy level has remained high. The science behind a ketogenic diet is solidly backed up by Taubes research published in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat“. According to Taubes’ research, it may also be the only way for people who have become severely insulin resistant, to effectively lose weight. The Ketogenic diet has always lived on the fringes of diet lore and has been seen as extreme. But the reality is that the low glycemic index diet (Low GI Diet) is effective because it is close to, but not quite, a ketogenic diet. Other diets like the South Beach Diet are also only effective because of the reduction in carbs and consequently insulin levels. The science behind this diet looks solid and it is part of the massive shift in nutrition research we’ve seen in the last few years. Prominent sport Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Having a social life on a ketogenic diet is something that many find hard to do. There are carbs pretty much everywhere you look, and that’s especially the case when you’re in a bar. Cutting out all the beer and wine is a great start, but sticking with hard liquor is usually the best choice. Even though hard liquor is made from natural sugars, grains, potatoes, and fruits – during the fermentation and distillation process that sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol. Drinking liquor can in fact deepen your level of ketosis, but will slow weight loss down. Ingestion of alcohol has effects on liver metabolism, in which more ketones are produced as you drink more. When your liver is taking care of the alcohol you drink, it’s being converted to a triglyceride which can also positively affect the production of ketones. Be aware that many people experience a heightened level of being drunk and at a quicker rate than usual. While that may be a great thing for some, you need to be careful – especially if you’re driving. Do not drink and drive. Be very careful when on a ketogenic diet and consuming alcohol. There are plenty of people that also experience worse hangover while on a ketogenic diet, so make sure you stay hydrated. The typical advice is to drink 1 glass of water per 1 shot (or glass) of alcohol you drink. Below you’ll find short and quick versions of everything you can drink. Scroll down the page to read a more in-depth explanation on each low-carb alcohol and what you should commonly avoid. Here’s a short list on what you can drink when you want to consume low-carb alcohol. Try not to stray away too much from the suggested list, but if you want more options scroll down and you’ll see a much more comprehensive list (including brands and carb counts)! Continue reading >>

Best Low-carb Fruits (and Which To Avoid)

Best Low-carb Fruits (and Which To Avoid)

Can you eat fruit on a ketogenic diet? In short, it’s best to avoid most fruits except for berries, which you can eat in moderation. Below, we’ll take a look at some of the fruits you can eat on a low carb diet and what you should avoid. When people switch to a ketogenic diet, fruit can be an area of confusion. Fruit has been marketed as healthy for many years and generally has a positive stigma behind it. While some fruit can be healthy in moderation, on a ketogenic diet we aim to keep our carbohydrates restricted to under 30g per day. In most cases, one piece of fruit would be the majority of the carbohydrate intake for the day. Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit that we intake each day. This usually makes berries (notably raspberries and blackberries) the fruit of choice for anyone on a ketogenic diet. If you’re having trouble with what type of foods to eat, make sure you check out our in-depth keto food list > As a general rule of thumb, avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they will have too many sugars for a ketogenic diet. Common Fruit and Their Carb Counts If you’re on a low-carb, ketogenic diet and want to indulge in some fruit occasionally, that’s no problem at all. Try to stick with berries and lower carb fruit that can fit within your macro ranges. Remember that you want to stick to 30g or less carbohydrate intake per day. Some people may argue that you have to eat fruit to be healthy. This is not the case. The ketogenic diet allows for a good amount of vegetables to be eaten. You can easily get any nutrient from vegetables that you can from fruits, except with a significantly lower amount of sugar. While a sweet treat may be desired once in a while, there really is Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

The Truth About Fruit

The Truth About Fruit

Fruit is nature’s candy. Naturally sweet and juicy, it’s a dietary favorite and a pretty big staple in Western culture. Most fruit is also decidedly not keto-friendly. But why? We get that question over and over. After all, isn’t the sugar in fruit “natural?” Doesn’t it have tons of fiber? The answer those questions are yes, and it depends on the fruit, respectively. But those answers do not necessarily make for a keto-friendly food. Remember, sugar itself is completely natural. Regular old table sugar is usually derived from the juice of the sugar cane or sugar beet. It’s essentially juice that’s been clarified and dried into crystals. Perfectly natural. Still not keto. The big disconnect seems to be in the commonly held notion that fructose, what we call “fruit sugar,” is somehow better for you than regular table sugar? But is that so? There does seem to be some scientific evidence that fructose is metabolized differently. It is not readily used by most cells in the rest of the body and so it is primarily processed by the liver instead. There also seems to be no blood glucose or insulin response from fructose. All of this would seem to add up to fruit being friendly. Not so fast. The problems with fruit are two-fold. First, as any diabetic who tests regularly will tell you, they do see an increase in blood glucose after eating fruit. Increases in insulin response follow increases in blood glucose, both of which we try to keep low on keto. Second, there is scientific evidence that increased fructose consumption not only leads to weight gain, occurring primarily in visceral belly fat, but has other, very serious adverse health consequences. Let’s take them one at a time. Blood glucose increases after consuming fruit It does seem to be true that fru Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

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