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Will Fruit Ruin Ketosis

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Your Ketogenic diet is going great! You’re losing weight, feeling better, and your prepared for a healthy life in Ketosis! Only problem is when you go to tell anyone about your diet they get a look of disgust and cover their nose. You ask a friend what he thinks the issue might be, and he only has one thing to say: “Ketosis Breath.” Ketosis Breath is an unfortunate side effect that befalls many Keto dieters. The important thing to remember is that it’s not just you, and it isn’t forever. There’s also an explanation and a solution for it. Why does Ketosis Breath happen? The Ketogenic diet is predicated on your body using fat as fuel instead of carbs. As you know, when your body begins to use fat as fuel, it releases Ketones into your bloodstream. Physicians suspect that the Ketosis breath comes from one of the Ketones know as Acetone. Acetone on your breath can manifest itself in a fruity, or rotten fruit smell. You have to remember, Acetone is the same chemical that’s in Nail Polish remover, which isn’t known for it’s amazing smell. The good news is that Ketosis means you’re hitting your dietary needs. The bad news is that you’re not getting a date any time soon. Just kidding, you’ll get dates just fine. Below we’ve listed out ways to deal with Ketosis breath. The wrong ones and the right ones. The Wrong Way to deal with Ketosis Breath A common reaction to having bad breath is to go to the nearest store and buy some breath freshening gum to mask the scent. No harm no foul, right? Well not exactly. Since you’re on the Ketogenic diet, you have to be aware of which brands of gum you’re going to chomp into. The same brands that produce the sugar spiked candy that we steer clear of produce some of the most popular breath enhancing gums on the ma Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Is the ketogenic diet healthy? We’re going to let you in on a little secret. Most popular healthy diets that are touted for weight loss—from Paleo to Mediterranean and vegetarian—share many of the same basic principles. All involve eating whole foods (as opposed to packaged and processed) and filling your plate with quality sources of protein, healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, and vitamin-, mineral-, and fiber-rich vegetables. (Again, we’re talking about the ones that fall somewhere on the healthy spectrum, not unhealthy fad diets like, ahem, the Grapefruit Diet.) However, each proposes a slightly different path that leads to fulfilling those principles. In this column, we’ll be breaking them down for you one by one so you can figure out which (if any!) is right for you. We’ll quickly explain the facts and then provide quick, actionable tips on how to follow the diet as part of a Nutritious Life. The Ketogenic Diet: What It Is The ketogenic diet is like Atkins amplified. Instead of just low-carb, it’s “almost no carb” and lots of fat. It’s been around for a long time but has recently gotten a lot of attention. Originally developed to treat children with epilepsy, the ketogenic diet restricts carb intake to as low as two to four percent of calories, with a 4:1 ratio of fat to carbs and protein combined. (For comparison, standard diets contain about 45 to 65 percent of calories from carbs; we generally recommend sticking to the lower end of that spectrum and avoiding refined carbs.) The goal of eating this way is to move the body into a state called ketosis. During ketosis, instead of breaking down carbs (there are none!) into glucose for fuel, the liver converts fat into ketone bodies, which become the body’s primary source of energy. Advocates s Continue reading >>

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

Note: Please note that if you are interested in a Ketogenic Diet used to treat Epilepsy or Pediatric Epilepsy, please start at Johns Hopkins who are the pioneers in this field. The wikipedia page for the Ketogenic Diet diet also has information on the diet as it relates to treating epilepsy. The diet below is simply for rapid and effective weight loss and uses a 1 to 1 fat to protein ratio rather than the 4 to 1 fat to combined protein and carbs ratio of the Ketogenic Diet pioneered by Johns Hopkins used to treat epilepsy. [wp_ad_camp_3] Disclaimer: I am neither a doctor nor self proclaimed nutrition expert so please consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any action that affects your health and wellbeing. After finishing Gary Taubes latest book, which seems to have rapidly become the cornerstone of a new approach to nutrition, I’ve become very interested in the Ketogenic diet. The speed of weight loss I’ve seen is incredible and my energy level has remained high. The science behind a ketogenic diet is solidly backed up by Taubes research published in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat“. According to Taubes’ research, it may also be the only way for people who have become severely insulin resistant, to effectively lose weight. The Ketogenic diet has always lived on the fringes of diet lore and has been seen as extreme. But the reality is that the low glycemic index diet (Low GI Diet) is effective because it is close to, but not quite, a ketogenic diet. Other diets like the South Beach Diet are also only effective because of the reduction in carbs and consequently insulin levels. The science behind this diet looks solid and it is part of the massive shift in nutrition research we’ve seen in the last few years. Prominent sport Continue reading >>

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

For those who follow a carb-restricted diet (low-carb, cyclical ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.), introducing a cheat day is not only a way to bring sanity into your meal plans – it is almost a requirement of sorts from a metabolic perspective to ensure that the progress with fat loss does not slow down. It is a bit hard for some people to understand how they can eat whatever they want and still get leaner – so let’s look into how and why it works. What exactly is a “cheat day”? Popularized by The 4 Hour Body book, it’s essentially cyclical strategic refeeding. You pick a day in a week (during which you would otherwise follow a restricted diet) where you allow yourself to consume copious amounts of absolutely anything you want, to your heart’s content. This concept is not new. It has been used for a while by those who followed calorie-restricted diets and allowed themselves one day per week where they would consume more calories than what they estimated their daily requirement was. As you now know, counting calories is a useless task. So we will discuss cheat days purely from the perspective of “carb refeeding”, because the assumption is that during the rest of the week you would be consuming limited amount of carbohydrates. Your total caloric intake during the day is never taken in consideration – only the ratio of different macronutrients. So, why cheat at all? There are many reasons. Pure ketogenic diets (those that strictly restrict any carbs) or diets that at least call for a significant reduction in carbs are psychologically tough. They are extremely effective in achieving the goal you might have in mind (whether it is shedding extra body fat and getting very lean, or using ketone bodies to improve energy levels, cognitive function, Continue reading >>

Diet Soda On A Ketogenic Diet

Diet Soda On A Ketogenic Diet

You’re doing all the hard work and sticking to prepared meals. You’re in a social surrounding and your friends, family or people around are consuming Pepsi, Colas, Dr. Pepper. For one reason or another, you get the sudden urge to have some. What do you do? Of course, we’re not talking about the soda high in carbs and calories which come from sugar but is diet soda. These are plain useless and put you into glucose burning mode instantly. Who thinks that diet soda on a ketogenic diet is allowed? It can certainly aid your goal for losing fat, but the ingredients within are bound to have an impact on your body. We are going to see how impactful diet soda is in ketosis. But first, we must know exactly what is keto. What is Ketosis and Keto? The ketogenic diet is a diet used for years for treating epilepsy, managing a healthy weight, and naturally shifts your body into ketosis. Ketosis itself is a process in your body when fat is used to produce energy, rather than carbs. Ketosis isn’t harmful, unlike ketoacidosis, a medical condition that is life-threatening affecting uncontrolled type 1 diabetics. Hence, the ketogenic diet is often associated with low-carb diet, which in fact, is done to ‘force’ your body to use fat more maximally as an energy source. For what to eat see our LCHF foods for a ketogenic diet. Diet Soda and Insulin If you’re diabetic then usually you have more attention of consuming excess sugars and what foods are best for you. Some refuse to touch all soda or prefer to sweeten up with sweeteners such as aspartame or sucralose. Even though they have no calories, it is a man-made product and can have an impact on hormones and blood sugar. Although a complex process within the body, studies show a difference in gut hormones secretion when drinking Continue reading >>

The Truth About Fruit

The Truth About Fruit

Fruit is nature’s candy. Naturally sweet and juicy, it’s a dietary favorite and a pretty big staple in Western culture. Most fruit is also decidedly not keto-friendly. But why? We get that question over and over. After all, isn’t the sugar in fruit “natural?” Doesn’t it have tons of fiber? The answer those questions are yes, and it depends on the fruit, respectively. But those answers do not necessarily make for a keto-friendly food. Remember, sugar itself is completely natural. Regular old table sugar is usually derived from the juice of the sugar cane or sugar beet. It’s essentially juice that’s been clarified and dried into crystals. Perfectly natural. Still not keto. The big disconnect seems to be in the commonly held notion that fructose, what we call “fruit sugar,” is somehow better for you than regular table sugar? But is that so? There does seem to be some scientific evidence that fructose is metabolized differently. It is not readily used by most cells in the rest of the body and so it is primarily processed by the liver instead. There also seems to be no blood glucose or insulin response from fructose. All of this would seem to add up to fruit being friendly. Not so fast. The problems with fruit are two-fold. First, as any diabetic who tests regularly will tell you, they do see an increase in blood glucose after eating fruit. Increases in insulin response follow increases in blood glucose, both of which we try to keep low on keto. Second, there is scientific evidence that increased fructose consumption not only leads to weight gain, occurring primarily in visceral belly fat, but has other, very serious adverse health consequences. Let’s take them one at a time. Blood glucose increases after consuming fruit It does seem to be true that fru Continue reading >>

The 'eat This Not That' Guide To The Keto Diet

The 'eat This Not That' Guide To The Keto Diet

The ketogenic diet can be dizzyingly complicated. You want to load up on fats and protein, and keep your carb intake low—but all fats and proteins aren’t alike, and there are some veggies higher in carbohydrates than others. Oh, and fruit is pretty much banned. But don’t worry: We’ve put together the best and worst of each category so you can go keto with confidence. Fats Eat this: Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Saturated fats including coconut oil, ghee, grass-fed butter, duck fat, tallow, and lard—all essential for a healthy immune system, dense bones, and proper testosterone levels. Monounsaturated fats like olive, avocado, macadamia, and almond oils, which boost heart health and provide vitamin E—important for vision and a strong immune system. Polyunsaturated omega-3s such as wild-caught salmon, sardines, and sustainably harvested seafood—to prevent heart disease and stroke and reduce blood pressure. Medium-chain triglycerides, fatty acids that are easily absorbed and used for energy. Linked to weight loss, MCTs increase satiety and rev-up metabolism. Not that: Refined fats and oils like sunflower, canola, soybean, grapeseed, and corn oils, which have been processed at high Continue reading >>

Is Chocolate Allowed On The Ketogenic Diet?

Is Chocolate Allowed On The Ketogenic Diet?

You may be wondering, is chocolate a keto food? Or, is chocolate allowed on the Ketogenic Diet? Well, it depends. First, some background on the Keto Diet. I went on the Keto Diet in 2014 and have found it gives me more energy than a high-carb diet. I think more clearly and I feel great eating keto. I love low-carb high-fat living. For me it’s the way to go. My diet consists of a good amount of fat and protein along with a small amount of carbohydrates that I get primarily from vegetables. For some fun ideas on replacing high-carb grains in your diet with low-carb vegetables, see my Healthy Low-Carb Swaps for Noodles post. I was diagnosed with MS in 2006. I’ve found that the Keto Diet has been helpful in stabilizing the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Studies show that a Ketogenic Diet can increase the production of brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), an anti-inflammatory protein that promotes the growth of nerves.1 You may be wondering, what is the Keto Diet? The classic Ketogenic Diet has three to four times as much fat as protein and carbohydrates combined according to the Charlie Foundation. A modified Keto Diet contains ratios of 2:1 and 1:1. What does this mean? In terms of macro-nutrients, a 2:1 keto meal would have around 60 grams of fat, 20 grams of protein, and 10 grams of carbs. When I went through the hassle of weighing all of my food and following a very strict Keto Diet, I used a 1.5:1 ratio of fat to protein + carbohydrates. I no longer weigh everything I consume because I enjoy eating a bit more intuitively and don’t like counting macro-nutrients. After much research on the Ketogenic Diet, I fine tuned my knowledge of it under the tutelage of the amazing folks at the Charlie Foundation, a non-profit that promotes the use of the Ketogenic Diet i Continue reading >>

How To Burn Stored Body Fat — A Ketosis Primer

How To Burn Stored Body Fat — A Ketosis Primer

“So, how do you tell your body to start burning stored body fat?” my friend and fellow mother asked. “Cut the carbs,” answered another mom. “I go into ketosis just about every afternoon.” “Ketosis? Isn’t that bad for you?” The short answer? No. I talk to a lot of people who want to lose weight. They try all sorts of things — exercise, calorie restriction, you name it. Sometimes, they lose the weight. Inevitably, they gain it back. That’s because what they’re doing is going on a diet — a temporary fix at best. What they need is a lifestyle change, a perspective shift, a new paradigm. Of course, you all know the paradigm I espouse — a conversion to eating real, traditional foods. Yet even a conversion to eating real food won’t necessarily help the pounds melt away. If you’re still eating 200 grams of carbohydrates a day — even if they’re “traditional” carbohydrates like sprouted or soaked grains, unrefined sweeteners, etc, you’re not going to lose weight without making some serious changes. If your body is regularly storing body fat (you gain a little bit of weight each year), then something is wrong with how your body metabolizes food. Let me introduce you to a new concept: the body fat setpoint. The body fat setpoint is the mass of body fat that your body attempts to defend against changes in either direction. It’s your body’s attempt to maintain homeostasis. This is why if you exercise more, you eat more. It’s also why if you restrict calories, your metabolism slows down to compensate. Why should you care about the body fat setpoint? From Stephan at Whole Health Source: We care because this has some very important implications for human obesity. With such a powerful system in place to keep body fat mass in a narrow range, Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Weight Faster If I Cut Out Fruit?

Will I Lose Weight Faster If I Cut Out Fruit?

If you’re trying to lose weight with Paleo, one of the first pieces of advice you’ll probably get is “cut out fruit.” Depending on your weight-loss plan and goals, eliminating fruit may or may not be good advice. If you’re trying to get into ketosis, or if fruit just fuels your sugar cravings, then cutting it out may be a good plan. If you’re stuck in a plateau and the scale isn’t moving, it’s a reasonable experiment to try. But on the other hand, not everyone benefits from cutting it out, and there’s no point in restricting another food group if it doesn’t actually help you. Cutting out Fruit to Stay in Ketosis One argument from the very-low-carb corners of the Paleo world is that fruit just doesn’t play nicely with ketosis. Ketosis is a total metabolic switch from burning carbs to burning fat for energy. It can be very useful for weight loss, especially for people with a lot to lose. A truly ketogenic diet is around 80% fat by calories. That leaves about 20% for carbs and protein together, with a typical upper limit of around 50 grams of carbohydrate (depending on what you’re eating and how your particular body works, this could be lower). Just to put that into perspective, 1 apple or 1 banana contains about 31 grams of carbs. That looks like it might fit into a day of keto eating, but for some people even that might be too much. And even for people who can tolerate around 50 grams of carbohydrate without getting kicked out of ketosis, eating that fruit would severely limit their options for the rest of the day. In particular, it would be displacing vegetables, which are more nutritious for the amount of carbs they contain. Crowding vegetables off your plate to make room for fruit is rarely a good idea. If ketosis is your plan for weight loss, Continue reading >>

Do Sweeteners (sucralose, Stevia, Xylitol) Affect Keto Diets?

Do Sweeteners (sucralose, Stevia, Xylitol) Affect Keto Diets?

Now that you’re switching to low carb, you’ve probably found yourself with some sweet tooth cravings. Most fruits and sugary snacks are off limits, but luckily you come across, the much debated about, sweeteners. You’ve heard so much about how they’re terrible for your health, but many people have conflicting opinions on how they affect ketosis. Having experimented with all kinds of sweeteners over the last few years, I thought I’d share my personal experience with consuming them. Before I get into it though, I’d advised you consult your doctor or nutritionist before deciding on a sweetener as I am by no means a medical professional! Are Sweeteners safe for a Keto Diet? I see a lot of people asking this question. Can I have Sucralose (Splenda)/Stevia/Malitol/Xyltitol/other sweeteners while on a ketogenic diet? Before I answer the question, first you need to understand the different types of sweeteners. The types of sweeteners available on the market can be categorized under two main buckets. Natural Sweeteners and Keto Natural sweeteners are exactly what the name means, sweeteners that come from nature and aren’t artificially made in a lab. There are two main natural sweeteners you’ll probably come across. Stevia Stevia is an extract from a plant which is approximately 200 to 300 times sweeter than sugar. Stevia has gained popularity in the last few years and is becoming more widely available at local stores across America. Stevia has a glycemic index of zero, which means it should not affect your blood sugar (insulin) at all. It’s also zero calories and since it’s naturally occurring, it’s been widely adopted by people all over. One thing to be wary when purchasing stevia is that the product may be mixed with other forms of sweeteners or bulking a Continue reading >>

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

Update: I did a (failed) ketosis experiment on myself that you can read about here, here, here, and here. Jimmy Moore is dropping weight with the fervor of a college wrestler right now on his experimental ketogenic diet. In fact, he’s lost about 47 pounds in the last 3 months, and he’s still going. He’s an awesome guy and he’s been struggling with his weight for a while now, so I’m psyched for him to say the least. He gives updates every month or so on his progress, but he never tells his readers exactly WHAT he’s eating. I’m itching to know. Now, Jimmy isn’t strictly Paleo: he eats full fat dairy, so even if he did report to us what he was eating, it wouldn’t be super helpful to a lot of people. I got to thinking what a ketogenic Paleo diet might look like. Without all that cheese and cream to assume the fat positions, it’d require a lot more tallow, lard, coconut oil, and coconut milk, as well as the fatty meats, eggs, nuts, and avocados. Here’s a picture of one of Jimmy’s meals to give you an idea of the amount of dairy he’s eating (well, at least at this particular meal). I think that’s sausage, avocado, scrambled eggs, some sort of hot sauce, and heavy cream. By the way, I’m in no way criticizing Jimmy right now. If I could eat dairy, I probably would, and I think this meal looks amazing. What’s ketosis? Before I go any further with this, I’ll briefly explain what ketogenic means and why one would aspire to be on a ketogenic diet. Some say you need to eat fewer than 30 grams of carbs per day to be in ketosis. It may be fewer than that to get into a deep state of ketosis, and you must not eat too much protein either. So a ketogenic diet is high fat, low(ish) protein, and very low carb. More on that in a moment. When you are in ketos Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

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