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Will Fruit Ruin Ketosis

Will I Lose Weight Faster If I Cut Out Fruit?

Will I Lose Weight Faster If I Cut Out Fruit?

If you’re trying to lose weight with Paleo, one of the first pieces of advice you’ll probably get is “cut out fruit.” Depending on your weight-loss plan and goals, eliminating fruit may or may not be good advice. If you’re trying to get into ketosis, or if fruit just fuels your sugar cravings, then cutting it out may be a good plan. If you’re stuck in a plateau and the scale isn’t moving, it’s a reasonable experiment to try. But on the other hand, not everyone benefits from cutting it out, and there’s no point in restricting another food group if it doesn’t actually help you. Cutting out Fruit to Stay in Ketosis One argument from the very-low-carb corners of the Paleo world is that fruit just doesn’t play nicely with ketosis. Ketosis is a total metabolic switch from burning carbs to burning fat for energy. It can be very useful for weight loss, especially for people with a lot to lose. A truly ketogenic diet is around 80% fat by calories. That leaves about 20% for carbs and protein together, with a typical upper limit of around 50 grams of carbohydrate (depending on what you’re eating and how your particular body works, this could be lower). Just to put that into perspective, 1 apple or 1 banana contains about 31 grams of carbs. That looks like it might fit into a day of keto eating, but for some people even that might be too much. And even for people who can tolerate around 50 grams of carbohydrate without getting kicked out of ketosis, eating that fruit would severely limit their options for the rest of the day. In particular, it would be displacing vegetables, which are more nutritious for the amount of carbs they contain. Crowding vegetables off your plate to make room for fruit is rarely a good idea. If ketosis is your plan for weight loss, Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Ketogenic-friendly?

Are Nuts Ketogenic-friendly?

Nuts have been a favorite of low carb dieters for a long time and now they’re popular among ketogenic dieters. Nuts are a quick and easy snack that you can purchase even at a gas station, they provide that nice crunchy texture that many people find missing from a low carb diet, and nut flours can be used to make a variety of baked goods that can be used as bread-substitutes. So, does that mean nuts are good to eat on a ketogenic diet? As with any food and any diet, I think the main questions to ask are: What are the health benefits of this food? What are the health downsides to this food, even if they are just potential ones? So, let’s take a look at nuts…even though nuts may help you stay in nutritional ketosis, should you be eating them? What Are The Benefits Of Nuts On Keto? 1. Nuts are Low in Carbohydrates Nuts naturally have very few carbohydrates. For example, 100 grams of dry roasted almonds have 7 grams of net carbohydrates, and 100 grams of raw macadamia nuts have 5 grams of net carbohydrates. Foods that are low in carbohydrates are crucial to a ketogenic diet since even a moderate amount of carbohydrate intake will make it very tough to get into or stay in nutritional ketosis. 2. Nuts are High in Fats Nuts are naturally high in fats, which helps you stay fuller and also helps you stay in nutritional ketosis. 100 grams of dry roasted almonds have 53 grams of fat and 100 grams of raw macadamia nuts have 76 grams of fat! So, they’re mostly fat. 3. Nuts are Nutritious (High in Various Vitamins and Minerals) Different nuts will have different amounts of vitamins and minerals, but many of them are excellent sources of some hard to get ones. For example, Brazil nuts are a great source of selenium and magnesium, and macadamia nuts are a great source of mangane Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Having a social life on a ketogenic diet is something that many find hard to do. There are carbs pretty much everywhere you look, and that’s especially the case when you’re in a bar. Cutting out all the beer and wine is a great start, but sticking with hard liquor is usually the best choice. Even though hard liquor is made from natural sugars, grains, potatoes, and fruits – during the fermentation and distillation process that sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol. Drinking liquor can in fact deepen your level of ketosis, but will slow weight loss down. Ingestion of alcohol has effects on liver metabolism, in which more ketones are produced as you drink more. When your liver is taking care of the alcohol you drink, it’s being converted to a triglyceride which can also positively affect the production of ketones. Be aware that many people experience a heightened level of being drunk and at a quicker rate than usual. While that may be a great thing for some, you need to be careful – especially if you’re driving. Do not drink and drive. Be very careful when on a ketogenic diet and consuming alcohol. There are plenty of people that also experience worse hangover while on a ketogenic diet, so make sure you stay hydrated. The typical advice is to drink 1 glass of water per 1 shot (or glass) of alcohol you drink. Below you’ll find short and quick versions of everything you can drink. Scroll down the page to read a more in-depth explanation on each low-carb alcohol and what you should commonly avoid. Here’s a short list on what you can drink when you want to consume low-carb alcohol. Try not to stray away too much from the suggested list, but if you want more options scroll down and you’ll see a much more comprehensive list (including brands and carb counts)! Continue reading >>

A Guide To Low-carb & Keto Cheating

A Guide To Low-carb & Keto Cheating

To cheat or not to cheat? That is the eternal question. Almost everyone is occasionally tempted – are you? This five-part guide will help you think through low-carb cheating… and if you do decide to cheat, it will help you do it smarter. 1. Bad and Less Bad Reasons to Cheat Why cheat? Some reasons are better than others. Bad reasons Politeness or wanting to fit in Aunt Martha will get over it when you skip her gooey dessert. Your dining companion’s surprise when you swap out potatoes for extra veggies is typically fleeting. Don’t overplay others’ interest or investment in your personal dietary choices. Remember, people are usually wrapped up in their own experience and quickly move on from yours. However, some people do get overly curious about your food choices. When that happens, be ready with a line like, “I’m sorry, I have a sensitive stomach.” Impulsivity An impulsive reach into that bowl of candy is an unsatisfying cheat. A last minute decision to eat a few of those cold French fries on your kid’s plate is rarely that satisfying. Planned cheating can empower – random cheating undermines. Be true to yourself and stick to your cheating plan. Bad Planning Grabbing a mediocre two-day-old sandwich from a gas station is a wasted cheat. Anything worth cheating on yourself for is, by definition, delicious. That stale sandwich is not. Keep quality low-carb emergency food in your car, purse, or briefcase so you never cheat because you are starving. For tips about on-the-go low-carb foods, check out our travel guide. For great snack ideas, check out our low-carb snack guide. For how to eat at restaurants and eateries, check out “How to Eat Low-Carb When Dining Out”. Less bad reasons To stick with low-carb long term A low-carb lifestyle lasts forever Continue reading >>

Best Low-carb Fruits (and Which To Avoid)

Best Low-carb Fruits (and Which To Avoid)

Can you eat fruit on a ketogenic diet? In short, it’s best to avoid most fruits except for berries, which you can eat in moderation. Below, we’ll take a look at some of the fruits you can eat on a low carb diet and what you should avoid. When people switch to a ketogenic diet, fruit can be an area of confusion. Fruit has been marketed as healthy for many years and generally has a positive stigma behind it. While some fruit can be healthy in moderation, on a ketogenic diet we aim to keep our carbohydrates restricted to under 30g per day. In most cases, one piece of fruit would be the majority of the carbohydrate intake for the day. Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit that we intake each day. This usually makes berries (notably raspberries and blackberries) the fruit of choice for anyone on a ketogenic diet. If you’re having trouble with what type of foods to eat, make sure you check out our in-depth keto food list > As a general rule of thumb, avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they will have too many sugars for a ketogenic diet. Common Fruit and Their Carb Counts If you’re on a low-carb, ketogenic diet and want to indulge in some fruit occasionally, that’s no problem at all. Try to stick with berries and lower carb fruit that can fit within your macro ranges. Remember that you want to stick to 30g or less carbohydrate intake per day. Some people may argue that you have to eat fruit to be healthy. This is not the case. The ketogenic diet allows for a good amount of vegetables to be eaten. You can easily get any nutrient from vegetables that you can from fruits, except with a significantly lower amount of sugar. While a sweet treat may be desired once in a while, there really is Continue reading >>

The Truth About Fruit

The Truth About Fruit

Fruit is nature’s candy. Naturally sweet and juicy, it’s a dietary favorite and a pretty big staple in Western culture. Most fruit is also decidedly not keto-friendly. But why? We get that question over and over. After all, isn’t the sugar in fruit “natural?” Doesn’t it have tons of fiber? The answer those questions are yes, and it depends on the fruit, respectively. But those answers do not necessarily make for a keto-friendly food. Remember, sugar itself is completely natural. Regular old table sugar is usually derived from the juice of the sugar cane or sugar beet. It’s essentially juice that’s been clarified and dried into crystals. Perfectly natural. Still not keto. The big disconnect seems to be in the commonly held notion that fructose, what we call “fruit sugar,” is somehow better for you than regular table sugar? But is that so? There does seem to be some scientific evidence that fructose is metabolized differently. It is not readily used by most cells in the rest of the body and so it is primarily processed by the liver instead. There also seems to be no blood glucose or insulin response from fructose. All of this would seem to add up to fruit being friendly. Not so fast. The problems with fruit are two-fold. First, as any diabetic who tests regularly will tell you, they do see an increase in blood glucose after eating fruit. Increases in insulin response follow increases in blood glucose, both of which we try to keep low on keto. Second, there is scientific evidence that increased fructose consumption not only leads to weight gain, occurring primarily in visceral belly fat, but has other, very serious adverse health consequences. Let’s take them one at a time. Blood glucose increases after consuming fruit It does seem to be true that fru Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

For those who follow a carb-restricted diet (low-carb, cyclical ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.), introducing a cheat day is not only a way to bring sanity into your meal plans – it is almost a requirement of sorts from a metabolic perspective to ensure that the progress with fat loss does not slow down. It is a bit hard for some people to understand how they can eat whatever they want and still get leaner – so let’s look into how and why it works. What exactly is a “cheat day”? Popularized by The 4 Hour Body book, it’s essentially cyclical strategic refeeding. You pick a day in a week (during which you would otherwise follow a restricted diet) where you allow yourself to consume copious amounts of absolutely anything you want, to your heart’s content. This concept is not new. It has been used for a while by those who followed calorie-restricted diets and allowed themselves one day per week where they would consume more calories than what they estimated their daily requirement was. As you now know, counting calories is a useless task. So we will discuss cheat days purely from the perspective of “carb refeeding”, because the assumption is that during the rest of the week you would be consuming limited amount of carbohydrates. Your total caloric intake during the day is never taken in consideration – only the ratio of different macronutrients. So, why cheat at all? There are many reasons. Pure ketogenic diets (those that strictly restrict any carbs) or diets that at least call for a significant reduction in carbs are psychologically tough. They are extremely effective in achieving the goal you might have in mind (whether it is shedding extra body fat and getting very lean, or using ketone bodies to improve energy levels, cognitive function, Continue reading >>

Diet Soda On A Ketogenic Diet

Diet Soda On A Ketogenic Diet

You’re doing all the hard work and sticking to prepared meals. You’re in a social surrounding and your friends, family or people around are consuming Pepsi, Colas, Dr. Pepper. For one reason or another, you get the sudden urge to have some. What do you do? Of course, we’re not talking about the soda high in carbs and calories which come from sugar but is diet soda. These are plain useless and put you into glucose burning mode instantly. Who thinks that diet soda on a ketogenic diet is allowed? It can certainly aid your goal for losing fat, but the ingredients within are bound to have an impact on your body. We are going to see how impactful diet soda is in ketosis. But first, we must know exactly what is keto. What is Ketosis and Keto? The ketogenic diet is a diet used for years for treating epilepsy, managing a healthy weight, and naturally shifts your body into ketosis. Ketosis itself is a process in your body when fat is used to produce energy, rather than carbs. Ketosis isn’t harmful, unlike ketoacidosis, a medical condition that is life-threatening affecting uncontrolled type 1 diabetics. Hence, the ketogenic diet is often associated with low-carb diet, which in fact, is done to ‘force’ your body to use fat more maximally as an energy source. For what to eat see our LCHF foods for a ketogenic diet. Diet Soda and Insulin If you’re diabetic then usually you have more attention of consuming excess sugars and what foods are best for you. Some refuse to touch all soda or prefer to sweeten up with sweeteners such as aspartame or sucralose. Even though they have no calories, it is a man-made product and can have an impact on hormones and blood sugar. Although a complex process within the body, studies show a difference in gut hormones secretion when drinking Continue reading >>

Is Chocolate Allowed On The Ketogenic Diet?

Is Chocolate Allowed On The Ketogenic Diet?

You may be wondering, is chocolate a keto food? Or, is chocolate allowed on the Ketogenic Diet? Well, it depends. First, some background on the Keto Diet. I went on the Keto Diet in 2014 and have found it gives me more energy than a high-carb diet. I think more clearly and I feel great eating keto. I love low-carb high-fat living. For me it’s the way to go. My diet consists of a good amount of fat and protein along with a small amount of carbohydrates that I get primarily from vegetables. For some fun ideas on replacing high-carb grains in your diet with low-carb vegetables, see my Healthy Low-Carb Swaps for Noodles post. I was diagnosed with MS in 2006. I’ve found that the Keto Diet has been helpful in stabilizing the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Studies show that a Ketogenic Diet can increase the production of brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), an anti-inflammatory protein that promotes the growth of nerves.1 You may be wondering, what is the Keto Diet? The classic Ketogenic Diet has three to four times as much fat as protein and carbohydrates combined according to the Charlie Foundation. A modified Keto Diet contains ratios of 2:1 and 1:1. What does this mean? In terms of macro-nutrients, a 2:1 keto meal would have around 60 grams of fat, 20 grams of protein, and 10 grams of carbs. When I went through the hassle of weighing all of my food and following a very strict Keto Diet, I used a 1.5:1 ratio of fat to protein + carbohydrates. I no longer weigh everything I consume because I enjoy eating a bit more intuitively and don’t like counting macro-nutrients. After much research on the Ketogenic Diet, I fine tuned my knowledge of it under the tutelage of the amazing folks at the Charlie Foundation, a non-profit that promotes the use of the Ketogenic Diet i Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Your Ketogenic diet is going great! You’re losing weight, feeling better, and your prepared for a healthy life in Ketosis! Only problem is when you go to tell anyone about your diet they get a look of disgust and cover their nose. You ask a friend what he thinks the issue might be, and he only has one thing to say: “Ketosis Breath.” Ketosis Breath is an unfortunate side effect that befalls many Keto dieters. The important thing to remember is that it’s not just you, and it isn’t forever. There’s also an explanation and a solution for it. Why does Ketosis Breath happen? The Ketogenic diet is predicated on your body using fat as fuel instead of carbs. As you know, when your body begins to use fat as fuel, it releases Ketones into your bloodstream. Physicians suspect that the Ketosis breath comes from one of the Ketones know as Acetone. Acetone on your breath can manifest itself in a fruity, or rotten fruit smell. You have to remember, Acetone is the same chemical that’s in Nail Polish remover, which isn’t known for it’s amazing smell. The good news is that Ketosis means you’re hitting your dietary needs. The bad news is that you’re not getting a date any time soon. Just kidding, you’ll get dates just fine. Below we’ve listed out ways to deal with Ketosis breath. The wrong ones and the right ones. The Wrong Way to deal with Ketosis Breath A common reaction to having bad breath is to go to the nearest store and buy some breath freshening gum to mask the scent. No harm no foul, right? Well not exactly. Since you’re on the Ketogenic diet, you have to be aware of which brands of gum you’re going to chomp into. The same brands that produce the sugar spiked candy that we steer clear of produce some of the most popular breath enhancing gums on the ma Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

The 'eat This Not That' Guide To The Keto Diet

The 'eat This Not That' Guide To The Keto Diet

The ketogenic diet can be dizzyingly complicated. You want to load up on fats and protein, and keep your carb intake low—but all fats and proteins aren’t alike, and there are some veggies higher in carbohydrates than others. Oh, and fruit is pretty much banned. But don’t worry: We’ve put together the best and worst of each category so you can go keto with confidence. Fats Eat this: Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Saturated fats including coconut oil, ghee, grass-fed butter, duck fat, tallow, and lard—all essential for a healthy immune system, dense bones, and proper testosterone levels. Monounsaturated fats like olive, avocado, macadamia, and almond oils, which boost heart health and provide vitamin E—important for vision and a strong immune system. Polyunsaturated omega-3s such as wild-caught salmon, sardines, and sustainably harvested seafood—to prevent heart disease and stroke and reduce blood pressure. Medium-chain triglycerides, fatty acids that are easily absorbed and used for energy. Linked to weight loss, MCTs increase satiety and rev-up metabolism. Not that: Refined fats and oils like sunflower, canola, soybean, grapeseed, and corn oils, which have been processed at high Continue reading >>

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