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Why Ketone Bodies Are Produced In The Body?

Ketone Bodies Metabolism

Ketone Bodies Metabolism

1. Metabolism of ketone bodies Gandham.Rajeev Email:[email protected] 2. • Carbohydrates are essential for the metabolism of fat or FAT is burned under the fire of carbohydrates. • Acetyl CoA formed from fatty acids can enter & get oxidized in TCA cycle only when carbohydrates are available. • During starvation & diabetes mellitus, acetyl CoA takes the alternate route of formation of ketone bodies. 3. • Acetone, acetoacetate & β-hydroxybutyrate (or 3-hydroxybutyrate) are known as ketone bodies • β-hydroxybutyrate does not possess a keto (C=O) group. • Acetone & acetoacetate are true ketone bodies. • Ketone bodies are water-soluble & energy yielding. • Acetone, it cannot be metabolized 4. CH3 – C – CH3 O Acetone CH3 – C – CH2 – COO- O Acetoacetate CH3 – CH – CH2 – COO- OH I β-Hydroxybutyrate 5. • Acetoacetate is the primary ketone body. • β-hydroxybutyrate & acetone are secondary ketone bodies. • Site: • Synthesized exclusively by the liver mitochondria. • The enzymes are located in mitochondrial matrix. • Precursor: • Acetyl CoA, formed by oxidation of fatty acids, pyruvate or some amino acids 6. • Ketone body biosynthesis occurs in 5 steps as follows. 1. Condensation: • Two molecules of acetyl CoA are condensed to form acetoacetyl CoA. • This reaction is catalyzed by thiolase, an enzyme involved in the final step of β- oxidation. 7. • Acetoacetate synthesis is appropriately regarded as the reversal of thiolase reaction of fatty acid oxidation. 2. Production of HMG CoA: • Acetoacetyl CoA combines with another molecule of acetyl CoA to produce β-hydroxy β-methyl glutaryl CoA (HMC CoA). • This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme HMG CoA synthase. 8. • Mitochondrial HMG CoA is used for ketogenesis. Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Does this test have other names? Ketone test, urine ketones What is this test? This test is used to check the level of ketones in your urine. Normally, your body burns sugar for energy. But if you have diabetes, you may not have enough insulin for the sugar in your bloodstream to be used for fuel. When this happens, your body burns fat instead and produces substances called ketones. The ketones end up in your blood and urine. It's normal to have a small amount of ketones in your body. But high ketone levels could result in serious illness or death. Checking for ketones keeps this from happening. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if you have a high level of blood sugar. People with high levels of blood sugar often have high ketone levels. If you have high blood sugar levels and type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important to check your ketone levels. People without diabetes can also have ketones in the urine if their body is using fat for fuel instead of glucose. This can happen with chronic vomiting, extreme exercise, low-carbohydrate diets, or eating disorders. Checking your ketones is especially important if you have diabetes and: Your blood sugar goes above 300 mg/dL You abuse alcohol You have diarrhea You stop eating carbohydrates like rice and bread You're pregnant You've been fasting You've been vomiting You have an infection Your healthcare provider may order this test, or have you test yourself, if you: Urinate frequently Are often quite thirsty or tired Have muscle aches Have shortness of breath or trouble breathing Have nausea or vomiting Are confused Have a fruity smell to your breath What other tests might I have along with this test? Your healthcare provider may also check for ketones in your blood if you have high levels of ketones in your urine Continue reading >>

Regulation Of Ketone Body Production: Answer

Regulation Of Ketone Body Production: Answer

What regulates ketone body synthesis? The primary regulator of ketone body synthesis is fatty acid availability. When hormonal conditions (e.g., high glucagon, low insulin) cause fatty acid concentration in the plasma to be high, malonyl CoA concentration in the liver cytoplasm is low (because acetyl CoA carboxylase is in the less active phosphorylated state). Fatty acyl CoA can enter the mitochondria at a high rate (because there is no inhibition of CAT I), and beta-oxidation proceeds at a high rate. The ensuing high mitochondrial concentration of acetyl CoA results in active ketone body synthesis. Continue reading >>

Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production In Melanoma And Glioblastoma Cells

Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production In Melanoma And Glioblastoma Cells

1Department of Food Biotechnology, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, Krakow, Poland 2Molecular and Metabolic Oncology Program, Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA 3Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture, Krakow, Poland 4Neurological Cancer Research, Stanley S Scott Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. Continue reading >>

Fatty Acid Oxidation, Ketone Body Production

Fatty Acid Oxidation, Ketone Body Production

Sort Draw a simple diagram linking glycolysis, the TCA cycle, triglyceride breakdown and triglyceride synthesis as seen in the liver. Include some of the major substrates, intermediates, and products such as glycerol, DHAP, fatty acyl CoA, malonyl CoA and acetyl CoA. (be able to do this...) Outline the 4 steps involved in the synthesis of triglycerides from glycerol-3-phosphate and activated fatty acids. 1 fatty acid, linked to Acetyl-CoA, is added to glycerol-3-phosphate via an acyltransferase enzyme. The product here is a glycerol backbone with one R group attached (lysophosphatidic acid). Another fatty acid is added to lysophophatidic acid via a different acyltransferase enzyme, creating a molecule with a glycerol backbone and two fatty acids (phosphatidic acid). The phosphate group remaining on the final carbon of the glycerol backbone is removed by a phosphatase enzyme (making diacylglycerol), in order for... The third and final fatty acid to be added by a third acyltransferase enzyme, creating the end triacylglycerol product. Describe how fatty acids are mobilized from adipose tissue. Triacylglycerols are stored in adipocytes (fat storage cells). When fatty acids are needed by the body for energy, hormones (including epinephrine) are produced and bind to their appropriate receptors. This leads to the adenylate cyclase enzyme catalyzing the production of cAMP from ATP. A cAMP-dependent protein kinase then has the effect of activating hormone-sensitive lipase via phosphorylation. Now, this lipase is able to cleave one fatty acid from the triacylglycerol. Further removal of fatty acids is able to occur through the action of diacylglycerol- and monoacylglycerol-specific enzymes. Outline the pathway for activation and transport of the fatty acids to the mitochondrion f Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies As Signaling Metabolites

Ketone Bodies As Signaling Metabolites

Outline of ketone body metabolism and regulation. The key irreversible step in ketogenesis is synthesis of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA by HMGCS2. Conversely, the rate limiting step in ketolysis is conversion of acetoacetate to acetoacetyl-CoA by OXCT1. HMGCS2 transcription is heavily regulated by FOXA2, mTOR, PPARα, and FGF21. HMGCS2 activity is post-translationally regulated by succinylation and acetylation/SIRT3 deacetylation. Other enzymes are regulated by cofactor availability (e.g., NAD/NADH2 ratio for BDH1). All enzymes involved in ketogenesis are acetylated and contain SIRT3 deacetylation targets, but the functional significance of this is unclear other than for HMGCS2. Although ketone bodies are thought to diffuse across most plasma membranes, the transporter SLC16A6 may be required for liver export, whereas several monocarboxylic acid transporters assist with transport across the blood–brain barrier. Abbreviations: BDH1, β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase; FGF21, fibroblast growth factor 21; FOXA2, forkhead box A2; HMGCS2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA synthase 2; HMGCL, HMG-CoA lyase; MCT1/2, monocarboxylic acid transporters 1/2; mTOR, mechanistic target of rapamycin; OXCT1, succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid coenzyme A transferase; PPARα, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α; SIRT3, sirtuin 3; SLC16A6, solute carrier family 16 (monocarboxylic acid transporter), member 6; TCA cycle, tricarboxylic acid cycle. Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies Formed In The Liver Are Exported To Other Organs

Ketone Bodies Formed In The Liver Are Exported To Other Organs

Ketone Bodies In human beings and most other mammals, acetyl-CoA formed in the liver during oxidation of fatty acids may enter the citric acid cycle (stage 2 of Fig. 16-7) or it may be converted to the "ketone bodies" acetoacetate, D-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone for export to other tissues. (The term "bodies" is a historical artifact; these compounds are soluble in blood and urine.) Acetone, produced in smaller quantities than the other ketone bodies, is exhaled. Acetoacetate and D-β-hydroxybutyrate are transported by the blood to the extrahepatic tissues, where they are oxidized via the citric acid cycle to provide much of the energy required by tissues such as skeletal and heart muscle and the renal cortex. The brain, which normally prefers glucose as a fuel, can adapt to the use of acetoacetate or D-β-hydroxybutyrate under starvation conditions, when glucose is unavailable. A major determinant of the pathway taken by acetyl-CoA in liver mitochondria is the availability of oxaloacetate to initiate entry of acetyl-CoA into the citric acid cycle. Under some circumstances (such as starvation) oxaloacetate is drawn out of the citric acid cycle for use in synthesizing glucose. When the oxaloacetate concentration is very low, little acetyl-CoA enters the cycle, and ketone body formation is favored. The production and export of ketone bodies from the liver to extrahepatic tissues allows continued oxidation of fatty acids in the liver when acetyl-CoA is not being oxidized via the citric acid cycle. Overproduction of ketone bodies can occur in conditions of severe starvation and in uncontrolled diabetes. The first step in formation of acetoacetate in the liver (Fig. 16-16) is the enzymatic condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA, catalyzed by thiolase; this is simply Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Abstract Ketone bodies are produced by the liver and used peripherally as an energy source when glucose is not readily available. The two main ketone bodies are acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-beta-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), while acetone is the third, and least abundant, ketone body. Ketones are always present in the blood and their levels increase during fasting and prolonged exercise. They are also found in the blood of neonates and pregnant women. Diabetes is the most common pathological cause of elevated blood ketones. In diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), high levels of ketones are produced in response to low insulin levels and high levels of counterregulatory hormones. In acute DKA, the ketone body ratio (3HB:AcAc) rises from normal (1:1) to as high as 10:1. In response to insulin therapy, 3HB levels commonly decrease long before AcAc levels. The frequently employed nitroprusside test only detects AcAc in blood and urine. This test is inconvenient, does not assess the best indicator of ketone body levels (3HB), provides only a semiquantitative assessment of ketone levels and is associated with false-positive results. Recently, inexpensive quantitative tests of 3HB levels have become available for use with small blood samples (5-25 microl). These tests offer new options for monitoring and treating diabetes and other states characterized by the abnormal metabolism of ketone bodies. Continue reading >>

Ketogenesis

Ketogenesis

Ketogenesis pathway. The three ketone bodies (acetoacetate, acetone, and beta-hydroxy-butyrate) are marked within an orange box Ketogenesis is the biochemical process by which organisms produce a group of substances collectively known as ketone bodies by the breakdown of fatty acids and ketogenic amino acids.[1][2] This process supplies energy to certain organs (particularly the brain) under circumstances such as fasting, but insufficient ketogenesis can cause hypoglycemia and excessive production of ketone bodies leads to a dangerous state known as ketoacidosis.[3] Production[edit] Ketone bodies are produced mainly in the mitochondria of liver cells, and synthesis can occur in response to an unavailability of blood glucose, such as during fasting.[3] Other cells are capable of carrying out ketogenesis, but they are not as effective at doing so.[4] Ketogenesis occurs constantly in a healthy individual.[5] Ketogenesis takes place in the setting of low glucose levels in the blood, after exhaustion of other cellular carbohydrate stores, such as glycogen.[citation needed] It can also take place when there is insufficient insulin (e.g. in type 1 (but not 2) diabetes), particularly during periods of "ketogenic stress" such as intercurrent illness.[3] The production of ketone bodies is then initiated to make available energy that is stored as fatty acids. Fatty acids are enzymatically broken down in β-oxidation to form acetyl-CoA. Under normal conditions, acetyl-CoA is further oxidized by the citric acid cycle (TCA/Krebs cycle) and then by the mitochondrial electron transport chain to release energy. However, if the amounts of acetyl-CoA generated in fatty-acid β-oxidation challenge the processing capacity of the TCA cycle; i.e. if activity in TCA cycle is low due to low amo Continue reading >>

Introduction To Degradation Of Lipids And Ketone Bodies Metabolism

Introduction To Degradation Of Lipids And Ketone Bodies Metabolism

Content: 1. Introduction to degradation of lipids and ketone bodies metabolism 2. Lipids as source of energy – degradation of TAG in cells, β-oxidation of fatty acids 3. Synthesis and utilisation of ketone bodies _ Triacylglycerol (TAG) contain huge amounts of chemical energy. It is very profitable to store energy in TAG because 1 g of water-free TAG stores 5 times more energy than 1 g of hydrated glycogen. Complete oxidation of 1 g of TAG yields 38 kJ, 1g of saccharides or proteins only 17 kJ. Man that weighs 70 kg has 400 000 kJ in his TAG (that weight approximately 10,5 kg). This reserve of energy makes us able to survive starving in weeks. TAG accumulate predominantly in adipocyte cytoplasm. There are more types of fatty acid oxidation. Individual types can be distinguished by different Greek letters. Greek letter denote atom in the fatty acid chain where reactions take place. β-oxidation is of major importance, it is localised in mitochondrial matrix. ω- and α- oxidation are localised in endoplasmic reticulum. Animal cells cannot convert fatty acids to glucose. Gluconeogenesis requires besides other things (1) energy, (2) carbon residues. Fatty acids are rich source of energy but they are not source of carbon residues (there is however one important exception, i.e. odd-numbered fatty acids). This is because cells are not able to convert AcCoA to neither pyruvate, nor OAA. Both carbons are split away as CO2. PDH is irreversible. Plant cells are capable of conversion of AcCoA to OAA in glyoxylate cycle. _ Lipids as source of energy – degradation of TAG in cells, β-oxidation of fatty acids Lipids are used for energy production, this process take place in 3 phases: 1) Lipid mobilisation – hydrolysis of TAG to FA and glycerol. FA and glycerol are transported Continue reading >>

Ketogenesis

Ketogenesis

What is Ketogenesis? Ketogenesis (1, 2) is a biochemical process that produces ketone bodies by breaking down fatty acids and ketogenic amino acids. The process supplies the needed energy of certain organs, especially the brain. Not having enough ketogenesis could result to hypoglycaemia and over production of ketone bodies leading to a condition called ketoacidosis. It releases ketones when fat is broken down for energy. There are many ways to release ketones such as through urination and exhaling acetone. Ketones have sweet smell on the breath. (3) Ketogenesis and ketoacidosis are entirely different thing. Ketoacidosis is associated with diabetes and alcoholism, which could lead to even serious condition like kidney failure and even death. Picture 1 : Ketogenic pathway Photo Source : medchrome.com Image 2 : A pyramid of ketogenic diet Photo Source : www.healthline.com What are Ketone bodies? Ketone bodies are water soluble molecules produced by the liver from fatty acids during low food intake or fasting. They are also formed when the body experienced starvation, carbohydrate restrictive diet, and prolonged intense exercises. It is also possible in people with diabetes mellitus type 1. The ketone bodies are picked up by the extra hepatic tissues and will convert to acetyl-CoA. They will enter the citric acid cycle and oxidized in the mitochondria to be used as energy. Ketone bodies are needed by the brain to convert acetyl-coA into long chain fatty acids. Ketone bodies are produced in the absence of glucose. (1, 2, 3) It is easy to detect the presence of ketone bodies. Just observe the person’s breath. The smell of the breath is fruity and sometimes described as a nail polish remover-like. It depicts the presence of acetone or ethyl acetate. The ketone bodies includ Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketone Bodies, And Ketoacidosis – An Excerpt From Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition

Ketosis, Ketone Bodies, And Ketoacidosis – An Excerpt From Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition

The following text is excerpted from Lipids (Chapter 8) of Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition. Ketone Bodies and Ketosis: Ketones are organic chemicals in which an interior carbon in a molecule forms a double bond with an oxygen molecule. Acetone, a familiar chemical, is the smallest ketone possible. It is composed of three carbons, with the double bond to oxygen on the middle carbon. Biological ketone bodies include acetone, larger ketones, and biochemicals that can become ketones. The most important of the ketone bodies are hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, both of which are formed from condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules. Acetone is formed from a nonenzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate. Ketone bodies are fuel molecules that can be used for energy by all organs of the body except the liver. The production of ketone bodies is a normal, natural, and important biochemical pathway in animal biochemistry (17, p. 577). Small quantities of ketone bodies are always present in the blood, with the quantity increasing as hours without food increase. During fasting or carbohydrate deprivation, larger amounts of ketone bodies are produced to provide the energy that is normally provided by glucose. Excessive levels of circulating ketone bodies can result in ketosis, a condition in which the quantity of circulating ketone bodies is greater than the quantity the organs and tissues of the body need for energy. People who go on extremely low-carbohydrate diets to lose a large excess of body fat usually go into a mild ketosis that moderates as weight is lost. There is no scientific evidence that a low-carbohydrate diet is capable of producing sufficient ketone bodies to be harmful. Excess ketone bodies are excreted by the kidneys and lungs. Exhaled acetone gives the brea Continue reading >>

What Are Ketone Bodies And Why Are They In The Body?

What Are Ketone Bodies And Why Are They In The Body?

If you eat a calorie-restricted diet for several days, you will increase the breakdown of your fat stores. However, many of your tissues cannot convert these fatty acid products directly into ATP, or cellular energy. In addition, glucose is in limited supply and must be reserved for red blood cells -- which can only use glucose for energy -- and brain tissues, which prefer to use glucose. Therefore, your liver converts many of these fatty acids into ketone bodies, which circulate in the blood and provide a fuel source for your muscles, kidneys and brain. Video of the Day Low fuel levels in your body, such as during an overnight fast or while you are dieting, cause hormones to increase the breakdown of fatty acids from your stored fat tissue. These fatty acids travel to the liver, where enzymes break the fatty acids into ketone bodies. The ketone bodies are released into the bloodstream, where they travel to tissues that have the enzymes to metabolize ketone bodies, such as your muscle, brain, kidney and intestinal cells. The breakdown product of ketone bodies goes through a series of steps to form ATP. Conditions of Ketone Body Utilization Your liver will synthesize more ketone bodies for fuel whenever your blood fatty acid levels are elevated. This will happen in response to situations that promote low blood glucose, such as an overnight fast, prolonged calorie deficit, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet, or during prolonged low-intensity exercise. If you eat regular meals and do not typically engage in extremely long exercise sessions, the level of ketone bodies in your blood will be highest after an overnight fast. This level will drop when you eat breakfast and will remain low as long as you eat regular meals with moderate to high carbohydrate content. Ketone Bodi Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis is an energy state that your body uses to provide an alternative fuel when glucose availability is low. It happens to all humans when fasting or when carbohydrate intake is lowered. The process of creating ketones is a normal metabolic alternative designed to keep us alive if we go without food for long periods of time. Eating a diet low in carb and higher in fat enhances this process without the gnawing hunger of fasting. Let’s talk about why ketones are better than glucose for most cellular fuel needs. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Body Fuel Basics Normal body cells metabolize food nutrients and oxygen during cellular “respiration”, a set of metabolic pathways in which ATP (adenosine triphosphate), our main cellular energy source is created. Most of this energy production happens in the mitochondria, tiny cell parts which act as powerhouses or fueling stations. There are two primary types of food-based fuel that our cells can use to produce energy: The first cellular fuel is glucose, which is commonly known as blood sugar. Glucose is a product of the starches and sugars (carbohydrates) and protein in our diet. This fuel system is necessary, but it has a limitation. The human body can only store about 1000-1600 calories of glucose in the form of glycogen in our muscles and liver. The amounts stored depend on how much muscle mass is available. Men will be able to store more because they have a greater muscle mass. Since most people use up about 2000 calories a day just being and doing normal stuff, you can see that if the human body depended on only sugar to fuel itself, and food weren’t available for more than a day, the body would run Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

Excess ketones are dangerous for someone with diabetes... Low insulin, combined with relatively normal glucagon and epinephrine levels, causes fat to be released from fat cells, which then turns into ketones. Excess formation of ketones is dangerous and is a medical emergency In a person without diabetes, ketone production is the body’s normal adaptation to starvation. Blood sugar levels never get too high, because the production is regulated by just the right balance of insulin, glucagon and other hormones. However, in an individual with diabetes, dangerous and life-threatening levels of ketones can develop. What are ketones and why do I need to know about them? Ketones and ketoacids are alternative fuels for the body that are made when glucose is in short supply. They are made in the liver from the breakdown of fats. Ketones are formed when there is not enough sugar or glucose to supply the body’s fuel needs. This occurs overnight, and during dieting or fasting. During these periods, insulin levels are low, but glucagon and epinephrine levels are relatively normal. This combination of low insulin, and relatively normal glucagon and epinephrine levels causes fat to be released from the fat cells. The fats travel through the blood circulation to reach the liver where they are processed into ketone units. The ketone units then circulate back into the blood stream and are picked up by the muscle and other tissues to fuel your body’s metabolism. In a person without diabetes, ketone production is the body’s normal adaptation to starvation. Blood sugar levels never get too high, because the production is regulated by just the right balance of insulin, glucagon and other hormones. However, in an individual with diabetes, dangerous and life-threatening levels of ketone Continue reading >>

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