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Why Ketoacidosis Cause Coma

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Sometimes While Working Out And Trying Hard To Hit Last Reps, I Feel A Taste Of Alcohol In My Mouth. Why Does This Happen?

My theory is that your body is burning fat while you are working out (that is part of the goal, no?) and you are tasting ketones/acetone. When our bodies metabolize fat, ketones (ketone bodies) develop and circulate in our bloodstream. This is a mild, usually harmless, condition called ketosis. Ketones spontaneously break down into acetone. Yes, the same acetone that is paint thinner, finger nail polish remover or adhesive remover/glue dissolver. The ketones and acetone have a very distintive taste and smell. To many people, the taste and smell are very similar to alcohol. So similar that people in ketoacidosis* have been arrested for public drunkeness, because their breath smelled like wine breath (also, ketoacidosis makes a person act drunk). [To me, ketones/acetone tastes like Elmer’s Glue when I was a kid.] *Ketoacidosis or Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition in people whose bodies don’t make enough insulin to metabolize the glucose in their blood. Ketones and excess glucose make the blood too acidic and this hyperacidic blood can cause coma, liver and kidney damage and (if not treated) death. Continue reading >>

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  1. Michael Simpson

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (the formal name, and the one most diabetics use, abbreviating it as DKA) can happen in Type 2 diabetics, but as you implied it is rare.
    Type 1 diabetics totally lack or have insufficient amounts of insulin. So the body produces the antagonistic hormone, glucagon, because there's no insulin, which to the body means there's low glucose. Glucagon then induces the liver to use fat as energy, producing ketone bodies while also forcing the liver to convert glycogen to glucose. Unfortunately, the blood glucose levels are high because the Type 1 Diabetic has no insulin. This causes the blood osmolarity to skyrocket, and the kidneys try to compensate by removing ketones and glucose from the blood.
    Since the kidneys have a maximum capacity to clear excess glucose from the blood, the blood becomes more acidotic and ketone bodies rise at the same time. And that leads to more serious issues like coma and death.
    The feedback systems are all broken, so the body spins out of control. It is often the first sign of Type 1 diabetes.
    So the one difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics is that Type 1 has no insulin, but Type 2 generally has insulin in the blood to suppress the release of glucagon. And this is why it's rare in Type 2 diabetics.

  2. Liang-Hai Sie

    We need insulin to be able to utilize glucose, type 2 has some insulin, not enough because of the insulin resistance, type 1 don't, so in type one ketosis can develop because the lack of insulin causes the body to burn fat that forms ketones if no inslin is administered. I knew a man who every time he was arrested by intent "forgot" to inject his insulin so ended in hospital with a keto-aciditic diabetic coma, out of jail.

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How Does A Diabetic Ketoacidosis State Differ From A Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State?

A difficult question to answer, but try to put it in a simple way. Both are same but slightly differ. The root cause of DKA and HHS is lack of insulin effect, so the first key aim of treatment is insulin. While subcutaneous insulin may suffice in less severe cases, intravenous administration is to be preferred in more severe cases because severe dehydration and hypovolemia may interfere with the absorption of subcutaneous insulin. Use of insulin pumps must be carefully monitored by trained staff. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical Continue reading >>

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  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication typically faced by people with type-1 diabetes, which occurs when body starts running out of insulin. This condition can leave the patient in coma or even death if not treated immediately. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when body is lacking lacking insulin to allow sufficient glucose to enter cells. Therefore the body absorbs energy by burning fatty acids and in turn produce acidic ketone bodies. Blood containing high levels of ketone bodies can cause serious illness. Diabetic ketoacidosis is itself a symptom of undiagnosed type-1 diabetes. Other symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: 1. Dehydration 2. Vomiting 3. Nausea 4. Blurred vision 5. Fatigue & sleepiness 6. Frequent urination 7. Rapid heartbeat 8. Unusual smell on the breath (similar to that of pear drops) 9. Confusion and disorientation 10. Hyperventilation or deep laboured breathing 11. Coma The symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually develop over a 24-hour period if blood glucose levels are and remain very high (hyperglycemia). Continue reading >>

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  1. Steve Rapaport

    Correlation isn't causation, so the question's presupposition of high blood sugar 'resulting' in diabetic coma is wrong. They both result from common causes.
    Diabetic coma (advanced diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA) is not the result of high blood sugar, but of low insulin and water levels. Low insulin levels lead to high blood sugar AND to ketoacidosis. Hence there's no minimum blood sugar level to watch for (though there may be for a given individual).
    The best way to avoid DKA is to keep insulin levels steady in the bloodstream, keep well hydrated, and keep small amounts of food in the system at all times.
    DKA is a result of the body demanding sugar for fuel, and being denied it through lack of insulin. The body burns fat instead, which produces ketone bodies as a byproduct. The ketones build up in blood, making it acid and highly concentrated. Concentrated blood sucks water out of cells by osmosis. Dehydration makes this worse. The ketones signal the liver that glucose is desperately needed, so it dumps stored glucose to help out, but in the absence of insulin this just makes things worse -- now the blood is full of ketones AND glucose, and even more highly concentrated. Both of these conditions will get worse until fast-acting insulin and missing electrolytes are added in carefully controlled doses, including a drip-feed for hydration and frequent recheck and adjustment of all those values.

  2. Suhail Malhotra

    First we must know that there are 2 types of diabetes.
    IDDM(insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) aka Type 1
    NIDDM( non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) aka Type 2.
    Type 1 is due to loss of insulin secretion by pancreas as in destruction of pancreas.
    Type 2 is due to insulin resistance that is insulin secretion is ok but body cells don't respond to it.
    Now the comas in these two types are different to the extent that they are named differently.
    The coma of type 1 is called the DKA(diabetic ketoacidosis) and that of type 2 is HONK( hyperosmotic non ketotic coma) now known as HHS(hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state).
    DKA occurs in type 1 diabetes or situations simulating type 1 mechanism like when a patient forgets to take his dose of insulin or in states when patient is regular with insulin but the body needs more than normal as in cases of surgery or illness or pregnancy.
    Blood glucose ranges in DKA from 250 to 600 mg/dl( 13 to 33 mmol/l) with increased ketones in blood which being acidic drive the blood ph to acidic levels ( <7.3). Symptoms include vomiting,increased urination, increased thirst, abdominal pain,increased rate of respiration(Kussumaul breathing) and in the end coma.
    HONK or HHS is caused by type 2 diabetes or situations similar to it like relative insulin deficiency combined with inadequate fluid intake and often precipitated in patients with type2 DM and a concurrent illness.
    Blood glucose ranges from 600 to 1200 mg/dl (33 to 66 mmol/l). The blood ph is normal (>=7.3) as ketones are absent. Patient is lethargic with increased thirst and increased urination leading to coma.
    Symptoms absent in HONK are nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and increased rate of respiration which were very much a part of DKA.

  3. Jae Won Joh

    If you are asking what blood sugar levels are commonly seen in diabetic coma[1], there is a very wide range. Patients naive to the condition typically present with blood glucoses around the 300s, while those with chronic poorly-managed diabetes can present with blood glucoses over 1000.
    [1] As Steve Rapaport already pointed out in his answer, the high glucose level is not, in and of itself, the problem.

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