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Why Is Respiratory Acidosis Bad?

Acid-base Disorders In Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pathophysiological Review

Acid-base Disorders In Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pathophysiological Review

Acid-Base Disorders in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pathophysiological Review Department of Internal Medicine and Systemic Diseases, University of Catania, 95100 Catania, Italy Received 29 September 2011; Accepted 26 October 2011 Copyright 2012 Cosimo Marcello Bruno and Maria Valenti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The authors describe the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to development of acidosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its deleterious effects on outcome and mortality rate. Renal compensatory adjustments consequent to acidosis are also described in detail with emphasis on differences between acute and chronic respiratory acidosis. Mixed acid-base disturbances due to comorbidity and side effects of some drugs in these patients are also examined, and practical considerations for a correct diagnosis are provided. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. Its prevalence varies according to country, age, and sex. On the basis of epidemiologic data, the projection for 2020 indicates that COPD will be the third leading cause of death worldwide and the fifth leading cause of disability [ 1 ]. About 15% of COPD patients need admission to general hospital or intensive respiratory care unit for acute exacerbation, leading to greater use of medical resources and increased costs [ 2 5 ]. Even though the overall prognosis of COPD patients is lately improved, the mortality rate remains high, and, among others, acid-base disorders occurring in these subjects can affect the outcome. The aim of this pa Continue reading >>

Acidosis - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Acidosis - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Acidemia is defined as an increase in plasma hydrogen concentration above normal, measured by a hydrogen concentration >45 nanoEq/L or a pH below 7.35. Joanne Hardy, in Equine Surgery (Fourth Edition) , 2012 Acidosis and alkalosis refer to the processes that cause net accumulation of acid or alkali in the body, respectively. Acidemia and alkalemia refer to the pH of the ECF: in acidemia, the pH of the ECF is lower than normal, and in alkalemia the pH of the ECF is higher than normal. The distinction between these terms is important; for example, a horse with chronic reactive airways disease may have a normal blood pH because of effective renal compensation, but in this setting the patient will have increased bicarbonate. This patient has alkalosis but does not have alkalemia. Allen J. Roussel, Christine B. Navarre, in Food Animal Practice (Fifth Edition) , 2009 Acidemia can quickly and accurately be assessed when a blood gas analyzer is available. These units are becoming more affordable, but access to such a unit is still not common in private large animal practice. Measurement and assessment of total carbon dioxide (TCO2) will provide essentially equivalent clinical data in assessment of nonrespiratory acidosis or alkalosis, which is the type of acid-base disturbance most frequently encountered in conscious animals. TCO2 measurement is available with many units that measure electrolytes. Blood tubes should be filled to capacity if TCO2 is to be measured to avoid falsely low values. In most cases in practice, the degree of acidosis will be estimated. Naylor has developed a scoring system for this purpose (see Chapter 21). Naylor also determined that dehydrated calves older than 1 week of age had more severe acidosis (mean base deficit of 19.5 mEq/L) than did those you Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesn’t cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of Continue reading >>

Effect Of Oxygen On Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Effect Of Oxygen On Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Effect of oxygen on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease In some individuals, the effect of oxygen on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is to cause increased carbon dioxide retention , which may cause drowsiness, headaches, and in severe cases lack of respiration, which may lead to death. People with lung ailments or with central respiratory depression, who receive supplemental oxygen, require careful monitoring. In individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and similar lung problems, the clinical features of oxygen toxicity are due to high carbon dioxide content in the blood ( hypercapnia ). [1] This leads to drowsiness (narcosis), deranged acid-base balance due to respiratory acidosis , and death. [2] Many people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have a low partial pressure of oxygen in the blood. Treatment with supplemental oxygen may improve their well-being; alternatively, in some this can lead to the adverse effect of elevating the carbon dioxide content in the blood ( hypercapnia ) to levels that may become toxic. [3] [4] In individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive supplemental oxygen, carbon dioxide accumulation may occur through three main mechanisms: [5] Ventilation/perfusion matching: under-ventilated lung usually has a low oxygen content which leads to localised vasoconstriction limiting blood flow to that lung tissue. Supplemental oxygen abolishes this constriction, leading to poor ventilation/perfusion matching. This redistribution of blood to areas of the lung with poor ventilation reduces the amount of carbon dioxide eliminated from the system. The Haldane effect : most carbon dioxide is carried by the blood as bicarbonate, and deoxygenated hemoglobin promotes the production of bicarbonate. Increasing Continue reading >>

4.7 Respiratory Acidosis - Assessment

4.7 Respiratory Acidosis - Assessment

The arterial pCO2 value is used to quantify the magnitude of the alteration in alveolar ventilation (assuming CO2 production is constant and inspired pCO2 is negligible). The arterial pCO2 alone is not satisfactory for assessing the magnitude of a respiratory acidosis in some cases. In particular, coexisting metabolic acid-base disorders cause compensatory changes in pCO2 and these must be accounted for. The best available quantitative index of the magnitude of a respiratory acidosis is the difference between the 'actual' pCO2 and the 'expected' pCO2 Actual pCO2 - the measured value obtained from arterial blood gas analysis. Expected pCO2 - the value of pCO2 that we calculate would be present taking into account the presence of any metabolic acid-base disorder. If there is no metabolic acid-base disorder then a pCO2 of 40 mmHg is taken as the reference point - ie we would use 40mmHg as the expected pCO2 The reason we have to allow for a metabolic acid-base disorder is that the pCO2 value changes from 40mmHg due solely to the body's compensatory ventilatory response to a metabolic acidosis or alkalosis so just using a value of 40mmHg as normal would be wrong and lead us to incorrect conclusions. With an acute metabolic acidosis, the body responds by increasing alveolar ventilation. This response is compensatory because hyperventilation results in a decrease in arterial pCO2 which tends to return the arterial pH towards 7.4 partially correcting the acute deviation of plasma pH from normal. The value of pCO2 at maximal compensation can be predicted using a simple bedside 'rule of thumb' and this calculated value is the 'expected' pCO2 which we use to compare with the 'actual'(measured) pCO2 value. If a metabolic disorder is present, we can calculate (using a simple formul Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes And Regulation

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes And Regulation

This lesson will discuss an important relationship between the kidneys and the lungs and how both of them play a role in respiratory acidosis. We'll also discuss some of the major causes of respiratory acidosis. Mutualistic Relationships A mutualistic relationship refers typically to a couple of different species of animals helping one another out. Take, for example, the birds that clean an alligator's teeth. The alligator gets a free dental exam, no insurance necessary, and the birds get a nice meal. It's really weird in a way that a bird and a reptile would rely on one another. They are just so different in terms of their size, function, and appearance, but their relationship is nonetheless very important. Well, the kidneys have a relationship with the lungs that is equally weird but important. I mean, the lungs are much bigger, look totally different, and don't seem to be related to the kidneys at all! But these two organ systems are in a very important mutualistic relationship, only one fourth of which can be discussed in this lesson. A Couple of Important Terms Before we get to everything, I want to clarify some terms. 'Acidemia' refers to an abnormally low pH of the blood. pH is inversely proportional to the concentration of H+ (hydrogen ions, aka protons). Hydrogen ions confer acidity upon a substance. So if we raise the concentration of hydrogen, we actually lower the pH. Acidemia is a result of acidosis. 'Acidosis' refers to a pathological state or process that leads to acidemia. We'll be using these terms later, so keep them in mind. To help remember that acid has a low pH, just think about the fact that gastric acid sits 'down' in your stomach. Therefore, something acidic moves 'down' the pH scale. Respiratory Acidosis Okay, with that out of the way for a bit Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Acidosis And Their Affect On The Human Body

Symptoms Of Acidosis And Their Affect On The Human Body

Symptoms Of Acidosis And Their Affect On The Human Body Symptoms of acidosis can be alarming for any person who is unaware of its existence in their body or does not understand the disorder .The symptoms of acidosis can bedifferent depending on its cause. Acidosis disrupts proper cellular function and activity, leading to various disease and sickness. Common causes of acidosis include the existence of an underlying illness, diabetes, smoking, poor diet, kidney disorders, genetic factors or excessive use of alcohol. Technically, acidosis is defined as an increase of hydrogen ion concentration at the cellular level. This in due course leads to the acidity of blood plasma. Acidosis is usually diagnosed when the blood pH of an individual falls below 7.35. To determine the cause of acidosis, an arterial blood gas analysis is required. There are two types of acidosis- metabolic and respiratory. Respiratory acidosis is caused when the lungs become incapable of getting rid of carbon dioxide by themselves. Metabolic acidosis occurs due to the failure of the kidneys to eliminate enough acid from the body. Regardless of whether you are suffering from metabolic or respiratory acidosis, symptoms of acidosis are usually similar. Take a look at some of the primary signs and symptoms of acidosis listed below. Acidosis causes the human cells to be exposed to acidic environment repeatedly, leading to a drop in oxygen levels. Lack of oxygen can sometimes lead to severe acidosis symptoms including shock or death. However, most symptoms listed above usually occur due to lack of oxygen in the body. One of the most common types of symptoms affecting a person with acidosis is the mental symptoms. When there the body is unable to supply enough oxygen to the brain, it fails to function correctl Continue reading >>

Causes And Consequences Of Fetal Acidosis

Causes And Consequences Of Fetal Acidosis

The causes and consequences ofacute (minutes or hours) andchronic (days or weeks) fetal acidosis are different In the past much attention has been paid to acute acidosis during labour, but in previously normal fetuses this israrely associated with subsequent damage In contrast, chronic acidosis, which is often not detected antenatally, is associated with a significant increase in neurodevelopmental delay The identification of small for gestational age fetuses by ultrasound scans and the use of Doppler waveforms to detect which of these have placental dysfunction mean that these fetuses can be monitored antenatally Delivery before hypoxia has produced chronic acidosis, may prevent subsequent damage and good timing of delivery remains the only management option at present. What is acidosis? Acidosis means a high hydrogen ion concentration in the tissues. Acidaemia refers to a high hydrogen ion concentration in the blood and is the most easily measured indication of tissue acidosis. The unit most commonly used is pH, which is log to base 10 of the reciprocal of the hydrogen ion concentration. Whereas blood pH can change quickly, tissue pH is more stable. The cut off taken to define acidaemia in adults is a pH of less than 7.36, but after labour and normal delivery much lower values commonly occur in the fetus (pH 7.00), often with no subsequent ill effects. Studies looking at the pH of fetuses from cord blood samples taken antenatally and at delivery have established reference ranges. Other indices sometimes used to assess acidosis are the base excess or bicarbonate. Neither of these is measured by conventional blood gas machines but is calculated from the measured pH and pCO2. The major sources of hydrogen ions in the fetus are carbonic and lactic acids from aerobic and a Continue reading >>

The Quick And Dirty Guide To Acid Base Balance | Medictests.com

The Quick And Dirty Guide To Acid Base Balance | Medictests.com

Your patient has a ph of 6.9 Is he acidic or alkalotic? Your patient has a ph of 7.4 Is he acidic or alkalotic? Your patient has a ph of 7.7 Is he acidic or alkalotic? Your patient has a ph of 7.25 Is he acidic or alkalotic? Your patient has a ph of 7.43 Is he acidic or alkalotic? Your patient has a ph of 8.0 Is he acidic or alkalotic? 1. acidic 2. normal 3. Alkaline 4. Acidic 5. Normal 6. Alkaline You take in oxygen by inhaling, your body turns oxygen into carbon dioxide, you exhale and remove the carbon dioxide from your body. Carbon dioxide is "respiratory acid."When you're not breathing adequately, you are not getting rid of this "respiratory acid" and it builds up in the tissues. The extra CO2 molecules combine with water in your body to form carbonic acid and makes your pH go up. This is bad. We can measure the amount of respiratory acid in the arterial blood using blood gases. They measure the amount of each gas in your blood. We measure the pH, the amount of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and the amount of oxygen in the blood (PaO2). PaCO2 is the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. We can measure it to see how much respiratory acid (CO2) there is in the blood. We use arterial blood gas tests to check it. How much respiratory acid (CO2) should there be? The normal value is 35-45 mmHg (mmHg just means millimeters of mercury, its a measurement of pressure.) The (a) in PaCO2 just stands for arterial. If you measured venous blood gasses, the levels are different and PvCO2 is used. If CO2 is HIGH, it means there is a buildup of respiratory acids because he's not breathing enough CO2 away. If your pH is acidic, and your CO2 is HIGH, its considered respiratory acidosis. If CO2 is LOW, it means there are not enough respiratory acids because he's probably hyperventilating too mu Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scarring and thickening of the lungs) Diseases of the chest (such as scoliosis) Diseases affecting the nerves and muscles that signal the lungs to inflate or deflate Drugs that suppress breathing (including powerful pain medicines, such as narcotics, and "downers," such as benzodiazepines), often when combined with alcohol Severe obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over a long time. This leads to a stable situation, because the kidneys increase body chemicals, such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can return the body to a state of balance. Some people with chronic respiratory acidosis get acute respiratory acidosis because an illness makes their condition worse. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

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Acidbase Disturbances In Intensive Care Patients: Etiology, Pathophysiology And Treatment

Acidbase Disturbances In Intensive Care Patients: Etiology, Pathophysiology And Treatment

Acidbase disturbances in intensive care patients: etiology, pathophysiology and treatment Center for Critical Care Nephrology, CRISMA Center, Department of Critical Care Medicine Correspondence and offprint requests to: John A. Kellum; E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Center for Critical Care Nephrology, CRISMA Center, Department of Critical Care Medicine Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 30, Issue 7, 1 July 2015, Pages 11041111, Mohammed Al-Jaghbeer, John A. Kellum; Acidbase disturbances in intensive care patients: etiology, pathophysiology and treatment, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Volume 30, Issue 7, 1 July 2015, Pages 11041111, Acidbase disturbances are very common in critically ill and injured patients as well as contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality. An understanding of the pathophysiology of these disorders is vital to their proper management. This review will discuss the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of acidbase disturbances in intensive care patientswith particular attention to evidence from recent studies examining the effects of fluid resuscitation on acidbase and its consequences. acidbase physiology , acidosis , alkalosis , anion gap , strong ion difference The modern intensive care unit is a place where complex acidbase and electrolyte disorders are common, with one study, showing that 64% of critically ill patients have acute metabolic acidosis [ 1 ]. Although it is generally believed that most cases of acidbase derangement are mild and self-limiting, extremes of blood pH in either direction, especially when happening quickly, can have significant multiorgan consequences. Advances in evaluating acidbase balance have helped in understanding the impact of fluids in the critic Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

DEFINITION Respiratory acidosis = a primary acid-base disorder in which arterial pCO2 rises to an abnormally high level. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY arterial pCO2 is normally maintained at a level of about 40 mmHg by a balance between production of CO2 by the body and its removal by alveolar ventilation. PaCO2 is proportional to VCO2/VA VCO2 = CO2 production by the body VA = alveolar ventilation an increase in arterial pCO2 can occur by one of three possible mechanisms: presence of excess CO2 in the inspired gas decreased alveolar ventilation increased production of CO2 by the body CAUSES Inadequate Alveolar Ventilation central respiratory depression drug depression of respiratory centre (eg by opiates, sedatives, anaesthetics) neuromuscular disorders lung or chest wall defects airway obstruction inadequate mechanical ventilation Over-production of CO2 -> hypercatabolic disorders Malignant hyperthermia Thyroid storm Phaeochromocytoma Early sepsis Liver failure Increased Intake of Carbon Dioxide Rebreathing of CO2-containing expired gas Addition of CO2 to inspired gas Insufflation of CO2 into body cavity (eg for laparoscopic surgery) EFFECTS CO2 is lipid soluble -> depressing effects on intracellular metabolism RESP increased minute ventilation via both central and peripheral chemoreceptors CVS increased sympathetic tone peripheral vasodilation by direct effect on vessels acutely the acidosis will cause a right shift of the oxygen dissociation curve if the acidosis persists, a decrease in red cell 2,3 DPG occurs which shifts the curve back to the left CNS cerebral vasodilation increasing cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure central depression at very high levels of pCO2 potent stimulation of ventilation this can result in dyspnoea, disorientation, acute confusion, headache, Continue reading >>

Interpretation Of Arterial Blood Gas

Interpretation Of Arterial Blood Gas

Go to: Introduction Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is an essential part of diagnosing and managing a patient’s oxygenation status and acid–base balance. The usefulness of this diagnostic tool is dependent on being able to correctly interpret the results. Disorders of acid–base balance can create complications in many disease states, and occasionally the abnormality may be so severe so as to become a life-threatening risk factor. A thorough understanding of acid–base balance is mandatory for any physician, and intensivist, and the anesthesiologist is no exception. The three widely used approaches to acid–base physiology are the HCO3- (in the context of pCO2), standard base excess (SBE), and strong ion difference (SID). It has been more than 20 years since the Stewart’s concept of SID was introduced, which is defined as the absolute difference between completely dissociated anions and cations. According to the principle of electrical neutrality, this difference is balanced by the weak acids and CO2. The SID is defined in terms of weak acids and CO2 subsequently has been re-designated as effective SID (SIDe) which is identical to “buffer base.” Similarly, Stewart’s original term for total weak acid concentration (ATOT) is now defined as the dissociated (A-) plus undissociated (AH) weak acid forms. This is familiarly known as anion gap (AG), when normal concentration is actually caused by A-. Thus all the three methods yield virtually identical results when they are used to quantify acid–base status of a given blood sample.[1] Continue reading >>

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