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Why Is Potassium Given In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an emergency medical condition that can be life-threatening if not treated properly. The incidence of this condition may be increasing, and a 1 to 2 percent mortality rate has stubbornly persisted since the 1970s. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs most often in patients with type 1 diabetes (formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus); however, its occurrence in patients with type 2 diabetes (formerly called non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), particularly obese black patients, is not as rare as was once thought. The management of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis includes obtaining a thorough but rapid history and performing a physical examination in an attempt to identify possible precipitating factors. The major treatment of this condition is initial rehydration (using isotonic saline) with subsequent potassium replacement and low-dose insulin therapy. The use of bicarbonate is not recommended in most patients. Cerebral edema, one of the most dire complications of diabetic ketoacidosis, occurs more commonly in children and adolescents than in adults. Continuous follow-up of patients using treatment algorithms and flow sheets can help to min Continue reading >>

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  1. Courtney Schumacher

    Ketoacidosis

    Comas

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    Why does Ketoacidosis cause coma? How is it treated?




    1 Answer







    I’m assuming that you do know that ketoacidosis does not have to mean that you have high blood sugar. It means that you have a high level of ketones in your blood, which are usually by-products of your body trying to break down fatty acids for fuel it’s not getting from your food intake.
    It is usually treated with fluids, electrolytes, and insulin. It is much more common in those with type 1 diabetes then type 2, but it can still occur.

    You can look up more specific information on diabetes at the Mayo Clinic site.

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Signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis - symptoms of diabetic coma What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal condition Happens when blood sugar levels are too high for an extended period of time When high blood sugar does not get treated, ketones gather in the blood and urine Signs and Symptoms of Diabeticketoacidosis Excessive urination, Extreme thirst and dry mouth Extreme fatigue or weakness and decreased appetite Fruity odor of breath or metallic taste in mouth Nausea and Vomiting and Abdominal pain Breathlessness or difficulty in taking breath Disorientation and confusion leading to Loss of consciousness and coma diabetic ketoacidosis anion gap diabetic ketoacidosis lab values diabetic ketoacidosis pathophysiology pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the Continue reading >>

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  1. gnomesb

    Hi everyone, I've been doing keto since 20/2/17 so 8 weeks now. I started monitoring my ketone levels about 18/3/17 and have been in ketosis every time. However, I notice that sometimes after I eat my ketone levels go up. For instance this morning before breakfast my blood ketone were 3.2. After breakfast they were 4.6 and 2 hours after they were 4.1. Does this suggest I am eating too much protein? I'm not sure how to interpret this.

    Also, my glucose levels before breakfast were 4.4. After breakfast, 4.69, 2 hours after 4.6. I realise that this isn't in a diabetic range but the fact that it seems to be taking me 3 hours after a meal to return to base rate indicates that I do have metabolic disfunction. I read Jason Fung's book 'obesity code' and in that he suggests that fasting enables one to reduce resting glucose levels and improve spike lengths. Has anyone else been able to achieve this?

  2. MarkGossage

    4.4-4.69-4.6 that is well with the 15% variability of your meter if you are in the UK so your readings could all have been 4.5.
    If your bloods had gone from 4.4 to 8.0 then you may have a problem . There's nothing wrong with those levels be pleased.
    If your ketone levels went below 0.5 then there is a chance you were coming out of nutritional ketosis. Your readings are great!
    Don't sweat you are doing fine..

  3. gnomesb

    thanks Mark. I'm in Australia. So 15% variance between fasting reading and post-eating reading is the general rule of thumb then. Thanks. I don't test all the time, just today I thought I would do a test over the whole day to see variances, I was just a little suprised by what I saw. Thank you for the reassurance.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroente Continue reading >>

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  1. Laurie R Zawiskie, RHIT

    Has anyone tried to code DKA in a patient with DM 2? The 3M encoder takes you to the code for secondary/other diabetes and then when you try to code other diabetic manifestations you get an excludes 1 notes saying they can't be coded with other diabetes. My code book is a 2014 draft, so I don't know if this has been corrected in the 2015 version, but there is not an entry for DM 2 with DKA. I think the 3M encoder is wrong to code it as secondary/other diabetes, but I can't find another way to code it.

  2. Lynn M Farnung

    Laurie,
    There is a Coding Clinic that addresses the type of DM with DKA. I have pasted it below.
    Diabetes mellitus with diabetic ketoacidosis
    Coding Clinic, First Quarter 2013 Page: 26-27 Effective with discharges: March 27, 2013
    Related Information
    Question:
    What is the correct code assignment for type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic ketoacidosis?
    Answer:
    Assign code E13.10, Other specified diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma, for a patient with type 2 diabetes with ketoacidosis. Given the less than perfect limited choices, it was felt that it would be clinically important to identify the fact that the patient has ketoacidosis. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), who has oversight for volumes I and II of ICD-10-CM, has agreed to consider a future ICD-10-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee meeting proposal.
    © Copyright 1984-2015, American Hospital Association ("AHA"), Chicago, Illinois. Reproduced with permission. No portion of this publication may be copied without the express, written consent of AHA. ------------------------------
    Lynn Farnung
    Inpatient/Outpatient coder, AHIMA Approved ICD-10 Trainer
    Original Message

  3. Laurie R Zawiskie, RHIT

    Thanks, Lynn. If a patient also has DM 2 w/nephropathy (E11.21), I guess we will have to ignore the Excludes 1 note that says E13.10 can't be coded with Type 2 DM (E11.-).
    ------------------------------
    Laurie Zawiskie
    Coder III
    Original Message

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