diabetestalk.net

Why Is Metformin Contraindicated In Ketoacidosis

Hypoglycemic Drugs

Hypoglycemic Drugs

RARELY PRESCRIBED (lower potency, greater toxicity) Keywords 2nd Generation Sulfonylureas: Glimepiride, Glipizide & Glyburide Fewer drug interactions, & side effects, more commonly prescribed Repaglinide Continue reading >>

Diabetes Poems Patient Oriented Evidence That Matters

Diabetes Poems Patient Oriented Evidence That Matters

Diabetes Management To prevent or reduce the progression of microvascular and macrovascular complications, recommended diabetes management encompasses both metabolic control and control of cardiovascular risk factors (Snow et al, 2004). The need for good glycaemic control is supported by the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial in type 1 diabetes and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes study in type 2 diabetes. In these studies, tight blood sugar control reduced microvascular complications such as nephropathy and retinopathy but had little effect on macrovascular outcomes (Snow et al, 2004). Oral HypoglycaemicAgents Antidiabetic treatment is not a substitute for a healthy diet and exercise, which should always be encouraged. In people whose blood glucose is inadequately controlled (HbA1C target 6.5-7.5% (NICE, 2002)) using lifestyle interventions alone, oral hypoglycaemic therapy can be initiated. Metformin Metformin reduces hepatic glucose production and increases peripheral utilisation of glucose. There is no risk of hypoglycaemia when used alone. Lactic acidosis is the most serious adverse effect but is very rare (0.03 cases per 1000 patient years), it occurs mainly with high dose (a maximum dose of 3000mg per day can be given) and in people with renal impairment (including situations with a risk of altered renal function e.g. dehydration, severe infection, ketoacidosis, surgery, use of iodinated contrast media); or hepatic impairment, alcohol abuse, old age and heart failure (AMH, 2004). It has been proposed that metformin should be considered the optimal first line therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes as long as there are no contraindications to its use (refer table). This is based on the antihyperglycaemic effect of metformin, positive influence on a Continue reading >>

Management Of Persistent Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Management Of Persistent Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete. INTRODUCTION — Initial treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus includes education, with emphasis on lifestyle changes including diet, exercise, and weight reduction when appropriate. Monotherapy with metformin is indicated for most patients, and insulin may be indicated for initial treatment for some [1]. Although several studies have noted remissions of type 2 diabetes mellitus that may last several years, most patients require continuous treatment in order to maintain normal or near-normal glycemia. Bariatric surgical procedures in obese patients that result in major weight loss have been shown to lead to remission in a substantial fraction of patients. Regardless of the initial response to therapy, the natural history of most patients with type 2 diabetes is for blood glucose concentrations to rise gradually with time. Treatment for hyperglycemia that fails to respond to initial monotherapy and long-term pharmacologic therapy in type 2 diabetes is reviewed here. Options for initial therapy and other therapeutic issues in diabetes management, such as the frequency of monitoring and evaluation for microvascular and macrovascular complications, are discussed separately. (See "Initial management of blood glucose in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus" and "Overview of medical care in adults with diabetes mellitus". Continue reading >>

Oral Hypoglycemic Agents

Oral Hypoglycemic Agents

Oral Antihyperglycemic Drugs Oral antihyperglycemic agents lower glucose levels in the blood. They are commonly used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. [1] Biguanides Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors Inhibit the upper gastrointestinal enzymes that convert dietary starch and other complex carbohydrates into simple sugars, which can be absorbed Contraindications: Diabetic ketoacidosis; cirrhosis; inflammatory bowel disease, colonic ulceration, partial intestinal obstruction, Continue reading >>

To Initiate Synjardy Or Synjardy Xr, Determine Appropriate Combination Of The Active Ingredient Of Jardiance And Metformin*

To Initiate Synjardy Or Synjardy Xr, Determine Appropriate Combination Of The Active Ingredient Of Jardiance And Metformin*

Postmarketing cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis have resulted in death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias. Symptoms included malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal pain. Laboratory abnormalities included elevated blood lactate levels, anion gap acidosis, increased lactate/pyruvate ratio, and metformin plasma levels generally >5 mcg/mL. Risk factors include renal impairment, concomitant use of certain drugs, age ≥65 years old, radiological studies with contrast, surgery and other procedures, hypoxic states, excessive alcohol intake, and hepatic impairment. Steps to reduce the risk of and manage metformin-associated lactic acidosis in these high risk groups are provided in the Full Prescribing Information. If lactic acidosis is suspected, discontinue SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR and institute general supportive measures in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended. JARDIANCE is indicated to reduce the risk of cardiovascular (CV) death in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established CV disease. JARDIANCE, SYNJARDY, AND SYNJARDY XR are indicated as adjuncts to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are indicated when both empagliflozin and metformin hydrochloride are appropriate. Empagliflozin, a component of SYNJARDY AND SYNJARDY XR, is indicated to reduce the risk of CV death in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established CV disease. However, the effectiveness of SYNJARDY AND SYNJARDY XR on reducing the risk of CV death in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CV disease has not been established. JARDIANCE, SYNJARDY, AND SYNJARDY XR are not recommended for patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition when the body has practically no insulin. This insulin deficiency results in extremely high blood sugar levels. Consequently, the muscle, fat and liver cells cannot use glucose for fuel. These cells are converted into glucose by hormones such as glucagon and adrenalin and turned into ketones through oxidation. As a result, the body uses fat for fuel. The increased levels of blood sugar are not flushed through urination. DKA is usually noticed in patients suffering from Insulin-dependent diabetes. A person can suffer from diabetic ketoacidosis if there has been severe dehydration and consequently the blood chemistry has been affected. There is accumulation of organic acids and ketones in the blood. Elevated ketone levels in the body upset its blood pH and make the blood acidic thereby triggering a toxic condition for the body's cells. Diabetic ketoacidosis is noticed when hyperglycemia exceeds 300 mg/dL. If diabetes ketoacidosis is not addressed in time, it can lead to coma and death. Surgery, infection, trauma, stroke or heart attack can also trigger diabetes ketoacidosis. Insufficient fluid intake, pancreatitis and alcohol abuse can trigger diabetes ketoacidosis. Symptoms of diabetes ketoacidosis include excessive thirst and general weakness. There is frequent urination, loss of appetite and vomiting. Other symptoms of diabetes ketoacidosis are weight loss and abdominal pain. A person suffering from DKA tends to experience low blood pressure and increased heart rate. High ketone levels can give rise to a fruity-scent on the breath and vomiting. The patient will be restless and agitated. The skin will be hot and dry and appear flushed. Patients suffering from diabetes must check their blood glucose levels if th Continue reading >>

Metformin‐associated Lactic Acidosis In A Patient With Liver Disease

Metformin‐associated Lactic Acidosis In A Patient With Liver Disease

Sir, Metformin is an orally active biguanide, and was found to reduce mortality and complications in obese diabetic patients in the UK Prospective Diabetes Study.1 As a result, the drug is widely used as first‐line therapy for patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We would like to remind prescribers of a rare, but commonly fatal complication of metformin therapy in patients with liver or renal disease. A 40‐year‐old Gujerati man was admitted through accident and emergency. On admission, little history was available from the patient, and no corroborative history was available, apart from the fact that he was diabetic and on metformin. He was short of breath at rest, with oxygen saturation of 84% on air, and had a Glasgow Coma Score of 13/15. Capillary blood glucose was 1.7 mmol/l. Arterial blood gas analysis on 60% oxygen revealed severe metabolic acidosis: pH 6.62, pCO2 8.3 kPa, pO2 47.8 kPa, base excess −31.2, bicarbonate 6.4 mmol/l, anion gap 37 mmol/l. Serum lactate was extremely high at >20 mmol/l. He had a low urea of 2.4 mmol/l, normal creatinine of 63 µmol/l, a raised aspartate transaminase (110 IU/l, NR 10–50), bilirubin (64 µmol/l, NR 2–17) and alkaline phosphatase (323 IU/l, NR 40–135). He had a macrocytic anaemia (haemoglobin 9.7 g/dl, NR 13.0–17.0; MCV 99.0 fl, NR 76.0–96.0), and deranged clotting (PT 30 s, control 12 s; KPTT 65 s, control 35 s), but normal platelet count (152×109/l, NR 135–450). Hypoglycaemia was confirmed by a venous plasma glucose of 1.9 mmol/l. On review of his medical notes, he had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 3 years prior to admission. He had not been seen at diabetic clinic for over 2 years, when his diabetes was well controlled with metformin 850 mg twice daily. Eighteen months previously, he was a Continue reading >>

What Medications Can Be Used As A Substitute For Metformin

What Medications Can Be Used As A Substitute For Metformin

Metformin is a prescription medication used for treatment of type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetes. Other medications may be considered if metformin does not adequately treat your type 2 diabetes. Types Types of medications for treating type 2 diabetes include dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 inhibitors such as Onglyza and Januvia, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists such as Byetta, meglitinides such as Prandin and Starlix, sulfonylureas such as Glucotrol, Amaryl and Glynase, thiazolidinediones such as Avandia and Actos and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors such as Precose and Glyset. Function DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, meglitinides and sulfonylureas increase insulin production, thiazolidinediones increases the effectiveness of insulin without increasing insulin production and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors blocks certain stomach enzymes that make the body more sensitive to insulin. Administration Byetta is available only as an injectable. The other types of medications are taken orally. Side Effects Sulfonylureas and thiazolidediones may cause weight gain. DPP-4 inhibitors increase risk of respiratory infections. Consult your pharmacist or physician for a more comprehensive list of side effects for each particular medication. Lactic Acidosis Metformin may cause lactic acidosis, which is a condition caused by excessive buildup of lactic acid in the body. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include weakness, drowsiness, decreased heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, lightheadedness and fainting. Other types of type 2 diabetes medications are not associated with development of lactic acidosis. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Metformin is contraindicated in cases of diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition caused by a shortage of insulin in the body. DDP-4 inhibitors, GL Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management In Cancer Patients

Diabetes Management In Cancer Patients

Hyperglycemia is a common challenge during cancer treatment and palliation. In addition, many patients with pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes undergoing cancer treatment develop iatrogenic hyperglycemia with unique features. The most common example is steroid-induced hyperglycemia,[1] but several other scenarios are common and clinically important (Table 1). Special considerations are often necessary regarding standard lifestyle recommendations, optimal choice of antidiabetic drug (Table 2), and goals of therapy.[2] In patients with active cancer, the focus of hyperglycemia management shifts from preventing long-term complications toward avoiding acute and subacute outcomes, such as dehydration from polyuria, infection, catabolic weight loss, hyperosmolar nonketotic states (HNK), and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA; Table 3).[3,4] It should be noted that the truly emergent conditions HNK and DKA are rare. The more common scenario of an asymptomatic severe elevation in blood glucose level (> 400 mg/dL, for example), although requiring a treatment plan with good hydration and close follow-up, does not typically require an emergency room visit or admission. Two representative clinical cases are presented here. Clinical Vignette #1 Corticosteroid-induced hyperglycemia A 53-year-old woman with a history of pre-diabetes and peripheral blood stem cell transplant for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) presented with asymptomatic elevated random blood glucose levels. After transplant she developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) with liver injury, which was treated with 60 mg of prednisone daily, tapered gradually to 20 mg daily at the time of presentation 2 months later. Random serum glucose level was 396 mg/dL. Previously, all serum glucose levels had been less than 160 mg/dL u Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Lactic Acidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Introduction A 49-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of dyspnea for 2 days. He had a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and a severe dilated cardiomyopathy. He had been hospitalized several times in the previous year for decompensated congestive heart failure (most recently, 1 month earlier). The plasma creatinine concentration was 1.13 mg/dl on discharge. Outpatient medications included insulin, digoxin, warfarin, spironolactone, metoprolol succinate, furosemide (80 mg two times per day; increased from 40 mg daily 1 month earlier), metolazone (2.5 mg daily; added 1 month earlier), and metformin (2500 mg in three divided doses; increased from 1000 mg 1 month earlier). Physical examination revealed an obese man in moderate respiratory distress. The temperature was 36.8°C, BP was 119/83 mmHg, and heart rate was 96 per minute. Peripheral hemoglobin oxygen saturation was 97% on room air, with a respiratory rate of 26 per minute. The heart rhythm was irregularly irregular; there was no S3 or murmur. Jugular venous pressure was about 8 cm. There was 1+ edema at the ankles. A chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly and central venous prominence. The N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level was 5137 pg/ml (reference range = 1–138 pg/ml). The peripheral hemoglobin concentration was 12.5 g/dl, the white blood cell count was 12,500/µl (76% granulocytes), and the platelet count was 332,000/µL. Initial plasma chemistries are shown in Table 1. The impression was decompensated congestive heart failure. After administration of furosemide (160 mg intravenously), the urine output increased to 320 ml over the next 1 hour. There was no improvement in the dyspnea. Within 2 hours, the patient’s BP fell to 100/64 mmHg Continue reading >>

Metformin: An Old But Still The Best Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin: An Old But Still The Best Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract The management of T2DM requires aggressive treatment to achieve glycemic and cardiovascular risk factor goals. In this setting, metformin, an old and widely accepted first line agent, stands out not only for its antihyperglycemic properties but also for its effects beyond glycemic control such as improvements in endothelial dysfunction, hemostasis and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, lipid profiles, and fat redistribution. These properties may have contributed to the decrease of adverse cardiovascular outcomes otherwise not attributable to metformin’s mere antihyperglycemic effects. Several other classes of oral antidiabetic agents have been recently launched, introducing the need to evaluate the role of metformin as initial therapy and in combination with these newer drugs. There is increasing evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies supporting its anti-proliferative role in cancer and possibly a neuroprotective effect. Metformin’s negligible risk of hypoglycemia in monotherapy and few drug interactions of clinical relevance give this drug a high safety profile. The tolerability of metformin may be improved by using an appropiate dose titration, starting with low doses, so that side-effects can be minimized or by switching to an extended release form. We reviewed the role of metformin in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and describe the additional benefits beyond its glycemic effect. We also discuss its potential role for a variety of insulin resistant and pre-diabetic states, obesity, metabolic abnormalities associated with HIV disease, gestational diabetes, cancer, and neuroprotection. Introduction The discovery of metformin began with the synthesis of galegine-like compounds derived from Gallega officinalis, a plant traditionally em Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Antipsychotic Medication: Literature Review

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Antipsychotic Medication: Literature Review

Background The second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are associated with metabolic disturbances. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare, but potentially fatal sign of acute glucose metabolism dysregulation, which may be associated with the use of SGAs. This study aims to review published reports of patients with schizophrenia and antipsychotic drug–associated DKA, focusing on the effective management of both conditions. Methods Using a predefined search strategy, we searched PubMed and EMBASE from their inception to July 2016. The search terms were related to “diabetic ketoacidosis” and “antipsychotic medication.” Case reports, case series, and reviews of case series written in English language were included in the review. Results Sixty-five reports were analyzed. In most patients who developed antipsychotic-associated DKA, 1 or more suspected antipsychotic medications were discontinued. In 5 cases, a rechallenge test was trialed, and in only 1 case, it resulted in the elevation of blood glucose. The majority was subsequently treated with a different SGA in combination with insulin/oral hypoglycemic agents; although approximately a third of patients had a complete resolution of symptoms or could control diabetes with diet only at the point of discharge. Conclusions Patients taking antipsychotic medications should be regularly screened for insulin resistance and educated about potential complications of antipsychotic medications. This will allow clinicians to individualize treatment decisions and reduce iatrogenic contribution to morbidity and mortality. To achieve best treatment outcomes, antipsychotic-induced DKA should be treated jointly by psychiatry and endocrinology teams. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crises

Hyperglycemic Crises

What They Are and How to Avoid Them One type results in about 100,000 hospitalizations a year with a mortality rate of under 5%. The other is thought to cause fewer hospitalizations, yet the mortality rate is about 15%. Severe hyperglycemic conditions, known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), involve very serious imbalances in blood chemistry and usually require that a person be hospitalized until normal blood chemistry is restored. Because they can occur in anyone with diabetes, everyone should know what causes them, how to prevent them, how they are treated, and when to seek medical attention. The body in balance Glucose metabolism is a complex balancing act. In people who don’t have diabetes, a number of interconnected processes help the body to use glucose and keep blood glucose levels in the normal range. The body constantly balances glucose extracted from foods and produced by the liver with glucose utilization by the body’s tissues. When there is ample glucose in the bloodstream, the liver converts some of it into glycogen for storage. When the body needs more energy, such as during a prolonged period of fasting or activity, the liver converts stored glycogen back into glucose so that it can be used by the body’s tissues. The liver also can create glucose from amino acids and fats. Insulin lowers blood glucose levels both by slowing down the liver’s glucose production and by helping the body’s tissues to use glucose for energy. If the blood glucose level goes too low, other hormones, called counterregulatory hormones, work against the action of insulin to raise blood glucose levels. These hormones include glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol. All work by prodding the liver to release glucose and by Continue reading >>

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

NASHVILLE -- Three type 2 diabetes drugs -- canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance) -- may lead to ketoacidosis, the FDA warned today. The sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are designed to lower blood sugar in patients with diabetes, but the FDA is investigating a connection between the drugs and dangerously high acid levels in the blood. They are also looking at whether changes will need to be made to the prescribing information, they said in the warning, which is posted online. At least two studies presented here at the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists have found a connection between the SGLT2 inhibitors and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). "Healthcare professionals should evaluate for the presence of acidosis, including ketoacidosis, in patients experiencing these signs or symptoms," the FDA said. "Discontinue SGLT2 inhibitors if acidosis is confirmed, and take appropriate measures to correct the acidosis and monitor sugar levels." The signs and symptoms listed included difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue or sleepiness. The FDA is issuing the warning after they searched their database of adverse event complaints, they said in an announcement. From March 2013 to June 2014 there were 20 cases of DKA reported, most of them with type 2 diabetes as the indication. Hospitalization was required in all of the cases, and the median time to onset was 2 weeks after starting the drug. "I would encourage that these cases be studied so we can learn the scenarios behind them so they can be broadcast," said Farhad Zangeneh, MD, medical director of Endocrine, Diabetes and Osteoporosis Clinic, in an interview with MedPage Today. "The important Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors

Sglt2 Inhibitors

SGLT2 inhibitors are not indicated for treatment of adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder that also is characterized by hyperglycemia. In type 1 diabetics, however, the pancreas produces little to no insulin. Sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a novel class of antihyperglycemics designed to work against SGLT2, a low-affinity, high-capacity transporter protein found in the kidney’s proximal tubules. The mechanism for SGLT2 inhibitors involves preventing the excretion of urinary glucose by reabsorbing glucose. SGLT2 inhibitors discourage this reuptake of glucose in the kidney. SGLT2 inhibitors are indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder commonly characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and inadequate levels of insulin or insulin resistance. Some SGLT2 inhibitors have been linked to side effects ranging from UTIs to kidney problems, amputations, bladder cancer and diabetic ketoacidosis (dka). Using SGLT2 inhibitors for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Generally, SGLT2 inhibitors are taken orally once per day, usually before breakfast. Your doctor will prescribe the strength of the pill and tell you exactly how and when to take it. The dose may be changed if your doctor decides doing so would be more beneficial for you. While taking an SGLT2 inhibitor, your doctor may advise you to check your blood sugar levels in accordance with a particular schedule. Be aware that SGLT2 inhibitors will be likely to cause your urine to test positive for glucose. Your doctor may also order tests to check your blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1C while taking SGLT2 inhibitors. Your doctor may periodically order these same tests, and possibly other Continue reading >>

More in ketosis