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Why Is Ketosis Bad In Pregnancy

Is It Safe To Go Carb-free During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Go Carb-free During Pregnancy?

It’s hard to escape the no-carb craze. At the grocery store you can find just about anything with a low-carb label, from tortillas to frozen dinners and more. Not since the low-fat craze has a single nutrient been so vilified. Carbohydrates are being blamed for a host of serious medical conditions including cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. But carbohydrates alone are not the culprit. Most Americans eat too many carbohydrate-rich foods that are also high in fat, sugar, and calories. There is much debate about the efficacy of diets such as Atkins, South Beach, and The Zone, but a growing body of research confirms that reducing your intake of high-caloric, refined carbohydrates can improve your health, particularly if you are obese or diabetic. As the old saying goes, “There is a time and a place for everything.” And experts agree that for most women, pregnancy is not the time to place yourself on a low-carbohydrate diet. “It is recommended that half the calories a pregnant woman takes in each day should come from carbohydrates,” says Dr. Hope Ricciotti, MD, an OB-GYN and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and author of The Pregnancy Cookbook. “Glucose, which is the byproduct of carbohydrates, is the primary fuel for the baby.” But before you reach for those chocolate chip cookies, remember that all carbohydrates are not created equal. Consuming fast food, candy, cakes, pizza, doughnuts, and soda can lead to excessive weight gain and exacerbate symptoms of gestational diabetes (diabetes developed during pregnancy). Since these foods have little nutritional value, they cannot provide your growing baby with the nutrients, protein, and healthy fat required for optimal development. “Even if you eat horribly the rest Continue reading >>

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

KETO//OS is quite safe during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. It is recommended to choose the caffeine free Keto//OS and drink plenty of water. Ketones naturally exist in the body, and are created as a normal process of fat metabolism. KETO//OS simply provides these ketones from an exogenous source, but they have the same beneficial impact. However, if you suffer from any medical conditions, it is always safe to consult your health care provider prior to starting any new nutritional supplement. Continue reading >>

Is Low Carb Safe During Pregnancy?

Is Low Carb Safe During Pregnancy?

Is low carb safe during pregnancy? Get the answer to this and other questions – are the benefits of LCHF different from women with PCOS who are thin, and women with PCOS who are obese? – in this week’s Q&A with the fertility specialist Dr. Fox: Is it safe for pregnant women to eat a low-carb high-fat diet? If a pregnant women is having adequate caloric intake and nutrition, does low carb have a negative effect on growth and development or the fetus? Natasha Dr. Fox: This is a great question. Although there are few, if any, good studies on this subject, we have to assume that this is the best diet for pregnancy. We recommend it to our patients and have had many success stories avoiding large weight gain, nausea in pregnancy, pregnancy induced hypertension, and gestational diabetes that had been experienced by those individuals in former pregnancies. Several of our staff members have engaged LCHF during their pregnancies also with great outcome. Lastly, for the cave women, north of Atlanta, Georgia or so, where did she find significant carbs between Labor day and Memorial day?? The other huge pregnancy complication, death during childbirth was very common before modern medicine and the advent of cesarean section. Carbs create big babies that create trouble for vaginal delivery. I have to believe that we didn’t lose 20 – 30% of cave women in childbirth. There aren’t many mother/baby in pelvis archaeological finds on record. We certainly don’t see that in any wild animal populations. If ketosis were bad for pregnancy, we would not be here now. Sadly, so many of the ?’s we all have about ketotic diet have not been studied in science really and it makes everyone uncomfortable with the approach since we live in such a factual scientific world. Alternatively, th Continue reading >>

Is Going In And Out Of Ketosis Bad?

Is Going In And Out Of Ketosis Bad?

In the earlier stages of adaptation going into ketosis may feel bad and going out may stop your progress for a fair while, so is to be avoided if all possible IMHO. Eventually once properly adapted you should have a lot more metabolic flexibility and will more readily switch. At that point you should mostly not notice anything anymore. Apart from how it feels, it is IMHO obviously not bad for you to switch energy pathways as conditions demand, that’s just part of how your metabolism works to help ensure you’re properly fuelled. According to Dr. Colin Champ, oncologist and assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, for weight loss in someone who doesn’t have much to lose, periodic ketosis for a couple days seems to work. For others with a lot of weight to lose and/or those that do poorly with carbohydrates, the diet may need to be maintained for several months. He said: “I personally go in and out of ketosis frequently, getting very strict every month or two for about 5 days. I have been in ketosis for 6 months and even over a year, but function and feel better when I avoid long-term ketosis.” Anecdotally, when some individuals still have some fat to burn, they thrive in ketosis for longer periods of time more so than others. Some longer-term ketogenic diet followers do experience hormonal changes and probably should not be on the diet for an extended period of time. Continue reading >>

Add High-fat Diet To The ‘don’t’ List For Pregnant Moms

Add High-fat Diet To The ‘don’t’ List For Pregnant Moms

WASHINGTON — There’s always new advice coming out about what pregnant women should — or should not — eat. Get enough protein. Get enough folate. Don’t eat too much sugar. But don’t go too low-carb. Don’t gain too much weight during pregnancy. Eat more nuts. Don’t drink. It’s enough to make any mom-to-be’s head spin. Four different animal studies presented at the recent Society for Neuroscience meeting add another mandate to the list: High-fat diets during pregnancy could have sweeping effects on a female’s offspring. Much of the science on high-fat diets begins in rodents. Salvatore Fusco and colleagues at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Rome fed female mice diets of about 45 percent fat for four weeks before mating and for two weeks after their pups were born. Offspring of the high-fat-diet moms had deficits in memory compared with offspring of mouse moms that ate normal chow, the scientists reported at the meeting on November 18. The mice had to swim to a platform in a memory task called a Morris Water Maze. After teaching the mice where the platform is, scientists cloud the water and remove the platform. They then measure how long the mouse spends in the area where the platform used to be. The offspring of mice fed the high-fat diet learned the task more slowly and spent less time near the platform’s location, a bad sign for memory. Fusco’s group also showed that the effects on memory continued on to the next generation of mice, possibly due to epigenetic effects, chemical changes that turn genes off or on. The effects of a diet high in fat may extend beyond memory. Staci Bilbo and colleagues at Duke University reported November 18 that a similar high-fat diet in mice caused pregnant moms to gain more weight, and their offspri Continue reading >>

Is Keto Safe During Pregnancy? Nutritionists Don't Recommend It

Is Keto Safe During Pregnancy? Nutritionists Don't Recommend It

When you find out you're pregnant, a million questions pop into your mind. If it's your first pregnancy, two million questions pop into your mind. One of the most common questions about pregnancy is whether or not you can keep your diet the same as it was before pregnancy. This is an especially important question to ask if you've been on a low-carb diet such as keto. You need to know: is keto safe during pregnancy? According to the official keto website, the keto diet is a low-carb diet where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy rather than carbohydrates. Much like other low-carb, high-fat diets, the keto diet promises significant results when it comes to weight loss. But can a diet that recommends 20 grams or less of carbohydrates a day help provide proper nutrition for you and your baby? According to nutritionist and health coach Erin Lorrain, the answer is no. Lorrain isn't a fan of the keto diet for regular women, let alone pregnant women. "The keto diet essentially tricks your body into thinking you're starving, causing your body to go into ketosis," Lorrain says. She goes on to explain that when you eat carbohydrates, your body produces glucose and insulin — two substances you need to survive. "Glucose and insulin help control your energy levels," Lorrain says. "And in order to maintain a healthy, balanced, diet, you should have healthy, balanced levels of glucose and insulin." This means you shouldn't survive solely on carbohydrates, but you shouldn't cut them out, either. Just like glucose is one of the main sources of energy for your body, glucose is a main source of energy for your growing baby, according to a study done by Yale University. The study goes on to state that to heavily restrict any source of energy during your child's dev Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Why Women Need To Drink Their Way Through Labour

Ketosis: Why Women Need To Drink Their Way Through Labour

If you labour for a long time, you could be in danger of dehydration and developing complications such as ketosis. Here’s how to keep yourself safe and healthy during birth. There's so much going on during labour that the last thing that either you, or your birth partner, may think of is getting you to drink enough. Not that sort of drink obviously. There's no ordering a cheeky mojito with your epidural but you do need to keep your intake of water up when you're giving birth if you want to stay healthy, hydrated and keep any chance of developing a nasty case of ketosis at bay. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a complication of dehydration, and a lack of carbohydrates (or glucose) for energy in the body. It is the result of the abnormal accumulation of ketone bodies in the blood stream, body tissues and urine. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis happens when the muscles have little, or no, glucose for energy to be able to function efficiently. Once the glucose supply in the blood stream is depleted, the body starts to break down its fat stores for energy instead. This produces ketones, often causing a fever, body weakness and the muscles to function inefficiently, including the uterus. In cases where the ketosis is prolonged, the condition can develop into ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis makes the person feel unwell and can damage their body organs. This is something that can occur for people who have uncontrolled diabetes. Ketosis and labour Ketosis is a common outcome for women who experience a prolonged labour (or pre-labour), becoming dehydrated and often causing their contractions to weaken, slow or stop. This can start to happen if glycogen (or glucose) is not being replenished through eating and drinking during labour. During labour, a woman has high-energy needs and her sto Continue reading >>

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Today my friend and colleague, Lily Nichols, a fellow registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, shares her insight on carbohydrate-restricted diets during pregnancy. This is a controversial topic that I believe deserves more attention and investigation, which Lily does brilliantly in the following article. Is It Safe to Go Low Carb During Pregnancy? With the wide adoption of low-carbohydrate diets, many people question if they are safe during pregnancy. While quite a few women use a lower carbohydrate diet to conceive (since they are especially useful for women struggling with infertility[1]), most medical professionals discourage women from continuing this diet during pregnancy. I find it ironic that if you tell your doctor that you plan to eat low carb during pregnancy, they’ll say it’s unsafe, but if you say you plan to eat a diet based on fresh vegetables, meat, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, seeds, and a little fruit, they’ll encourage you to stay the course. The controversy over the safety of low carbohydrate diets in pregnancy stems primarily from misconceptions around ketosis. It’s incorrect, but widely accepted, that ketosis during pregnancy is harmful to a developing baby. When I first dove into the research, I was shocked to find that studies on healthy, non-diabetic pregnant women (eating a “regular” diet) show a marked elevation in ketones after a 12-18 hour fast, which is akin to eating dinner at 8pm and having breakfast at 8am (or skipping breakfast entirely).[2] What’s more interesting is that pregnancy actually seems to favor a state of ketosis. Compared to non-pregnant women, blood ketone concentrations are about 3-fold higher in healthy pregnant women after an overnight fast.[3] And in late pregnancy, metabolism shifts to a state o Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Toxaemia And

Pregnancy Toxaemia And

Contents Industry Background Management Nutrition Animal Health Breeding Fibre Production Fibre Marketing Meat Production and Marketing Pasture and Weed Control Economic Analysis Tanning Skins ketosis in goats The diseases pregnancy toxaemia and ketosis can cause severe problems in goats. While the diseases are clinically different and occur during different stages of pregnancy and lactation, the basis of the disorder is essentially the same: a decrease in blood sugar levels and an increase in ketones. In ruminants, glucose is synthesised mainly from propionic acid (a volatile fatty acid produced in the rumen) and from amino acids. The amount of glucose that is absorbed directly depends on how much dietary carbohydrate escapes rumen fermentation and is digested in the small intestine. This form of glucose uptake varies with different feeds as well as their treatment. Ruminants can use products from rumen fermentation, such as volatile fatty acids, for most of their energy requirements. However, the nervous system, kidneys, mammary gland and foetus have a direct requirement for glucose. During periods of peak glucose requirement (late pregnancy and early lactation) problems may arise due to a glucose deficiency. The incidence of pregnancy toxaemia and ketosis varies with the two main types of goats. In dairy goats with a genetic potential for high milk production, ketosis may be a potential problem; in non-milch goats (Angora, Cashmere and meat) pregnancy toxaemia is more common. PREGNANCY TOXAEMIA Main causes The most important cause of pregnancy toxaemia is a decline in the plane of nutrition during the last six to eight weeks of pregnancy. This places the pregnant female in a difficult situation because the developing foetus imposes an unremitting drain on available m Continue reading >>

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Low-carb Diets…yes Or No?

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes: Low-carb Diets…yes Or No?

I’m a big fan of eating low-carb as a person with type 1 diabetes. The benefits are obvious immediately and I simply feel more energetic, more stable (because of more easily managed blood sugars), and full of healthy choices (because, in my opinion, a proper low-carb diet should incorporate a heck-load of vegetables). But during pregnancy…no, I personally don’t think a low-carb diet makes sense. Again, I want to state: this is my personal opinion! Not science or fact or me telling you how you ought to live your life. Allow me to clarify first: what counts as a low-carb diet? Technically a low-carb diet is anything below 50 grams of carbohydrate. A ketogenic diet is a diet so low in carbs that your body is producing ketones for fuel, and usually requires you to eat fewer than 20 grams of carbs per day. Both of which I think isn’t ideal when there’s a growing baby bump relying on your for a variety of delicious nutrition. What I mean when I’m talking about ketones: I’m not talking about ketones produced from lack of insulin and high blood sugars, such as DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis). I’m talking about nutritional ketosis which is not life-threatening, even to a diabetic. Read more about Nutritional Ketosis vs. DKA here. Has it been studied? Before my first pregnancy, the only research I could find on women who ate low-carb diets during their pregnancy and its impact on the fetus was that ketogenic diets seemed to result in smaller brains in the babies. I’ve looked and looked for that study while writing this blog, and I can’t find it. (I found it originally on PubMed.org.) Overall, it simply hasn’t been studied properly or thoroughly or perhaps even more than once. That doesn’t automatically mean it’s a bad idea, but it’s good to know that it si Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis, And Is It Healthy?

What Is Ketosis, And Is It Healthy?

Ketosis is a natural metabolic state. It involves the body producing ketone bodies out of fat, and using them for energy instead of carbs. You can get into ketosis by following a very low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet (1). In addition to fast weight loss, ketosis may have several health benefits, such as reduced seizures in epileptic children (2). Ketosis is quite complex, but this article explains what it is and how it can benefit you. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which fat provides most of the fuel for the body. It occurs when there is limited access to glucose (blood sugar), which is the preferred fuel source for many cells in the body. Ketosis is most often associated with ketogenic and very low-carb diets. It also happens during pregnancy, infancy, fasting and starvation (3, 4, 5, 6). To go into ketosis, people generally need to eat fewer than 50 grams of carbs per day and sometimes as little as 20 grams per day. This requires removing certain food items from your diet, such as grains, candy and sugary soft drinks. You also have to cut back on legumes, potatoes and fruit. When eating a very low-carb diet, levels of the hormone insulin go down and fatty acids are released from body fat stores in large amounts. Many of these fatty acids are transferred to the liver, where they are oxidized and turned into ketones (or ketone bodies). These molecules can provide energy for the body. Unlike fatty acids, ketones can cross the blood-brain barrier and provide energy for the brain in the absence of glucose. Ketosis is a metabolic state where ketones become the main sources of energy for the body and brain. This happens when carb intake and insulin levels are very low. It's a common misunderstanding that the brain doesn't function without dietary carbs. It's true that glu Continue reading >>

Keto During Pregnancy

Keto During Pregnancy

I get a ton of emails a few months after these consults telling me that they are ecstatic and are now pregnant but are wondering on what to eat now. As if this diet of REAL food would be harmful to a fetus. There are many reasons why to not add in certain foods like gluten and dairy. Many times when cravings get the best of pregnant clients and they consume these foods, the auto-immune response can result in a miscarriage. But even if the clients are committed about staying away from gluten and dairy, they often worry that too low of carbs is bad for the fetus. You will never find evidence of this, but you will read it all over the web. The information that clients read have a few flaws: 1. A huge mistake is when people and doctors compare benign dietary ketosis to diabetic ketoacidosis. You can produce ketones in a starvation state. So instead of using a well-formulated low carb diet, they starved pregnant rats to get them into ketosis. The flaw in that evidence should be obvious. 2. The last form of this “evidence” is when they sliced up the brains of rat fetuses and saturated them in ketones. What happened was that the brain cells lived but it stopped producing new brain cells. This is thought to be evidence that ketosis causes retardation. Now let’s dive into the facts. The lean human body is 74% fat and 26% protein by calories. Fats are a structural part of every human cell and the preferred fuel source of the mitochondria, the energy-burning units of each cell. A fetus naturally uses ketones before and immediately after birth. Many studies done on pregnant pigs that are placed on ketogenic diets have fetuses with “increased fetal brain weight, cell size and protein content. In the early stages of pregnancy there is an upsurge in body fat accumulation, whic Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet For Pregnant Women

Low Carb Diet For Pregnant Women

If you're pregnant, you may be wondering whether it's OK to start or stay on a low-carbohydrate diet. Generally, obstetricians don't advise their patients to diet for weight-loss purposes during pregnancy because it's easy to deny your body--and your baby--the nutrients cells need. Low-carbohydrate diets, in particular, can result in some nutrient deficiencies. Pregnancy Weight During pregnancy, your body will change in many ways to support your developing baby. One of the important changes that takes place in most women during pregnancy is that they increase their body fat in specific areas; this helps support your nutrient needs while you're breastfeeding and also ensures that your baby always has access to plenty of calories while it's growing. The average woman needs to gain between 25 and 35 pounds during pregnancy, note Dr. Michael Roizen and Dr. Mehmet Oz in their book "You: Having A Baby." As such, for most women, dieting for weight loss during pregnancy isn't appropriate. Low-Carbohydrate Diets If you determine, together with your obstetrician, that you should be restricting your calories or attempting to lose weight during pregnancy, you'll also want to discuss what kinds of foods you should be eating. Generally, low-carbohydrate diets -- particularly those like the Atkins Diet that restrict carbohydrates quite dramatically -- aren't appropriate for pregnancy because they significantly change cellular metabolism. Roizen and Oz emphasize the need during pregnancy for a healthy, balanced diet incorporating proteins, carbohydrates and fats. Ketosis Very low-carbohydrate diets result in ketosis, a metabolic state in which your cells send your body a starvation signal. This can lead to a number of side effects, and its safety in pregnant women hasn't been tested. H Continue reading >>

Is Keto Safe For Pregnant Women?

Is Keto Safe For Pregnant Women?

Ketosis during pregnancy is a controversial topic. Health authorities and bloggers often praise low-carb diets for their ability to reverse infertility. But when it comes to low-carb during pregnancy, many of these same “experts” warn against the “dangers” of burning fat for fuel while pregnant. Most conventional medicine doctors would likely condemn this dietary choice as well. But is there any evidence to back up all of the fear mongering? The Evidence There are a few studies which on the surface seem to suggest possible complications with ketosis during pregnancy. Upon further investigation, however, they fall short of rational scrutiny. There aren’t many studies on pregnant women in ketosis. This likely due to the ethics and liability concerns involved with experimenting on vulnerable populations. It is important to note though that mountains of anecdotal evidence suggest that an intelligently formulated ketogenic is not only safe but may actually be beneficial to both mom and baby. Despite this, however, most mainstream doctors and media outlets have conflated ketosis with a dangerous condition called ketoacidosis and thus trumpet the dangers of keto during pregnancy. Ketosis vs. Ketoacidosis Much of the worry surrounding ketosis and pregnancy stems from a conflation of dietary ketosis with a dangerous metabolic state called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis happens to diabetics and involves extremely high levels of glucose and ketones in the blood. Ketoacidosis is very different from ketosis and should not be a concern for non-diabetic pregnant women. So is ketosis safe during pregnancy? The Keto Pregnancy Connection Far from being harmful, ketosis is actually a natural part of every pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women are able to enter ketosis 3 times more quic Continue reading >>

Ketosis During Pregnancy – Is It Safe?

Ketosis During Pregnancy – Is It Safe?

Ketosis is a state of metabolism in adults where the energy is supplied to the body by ketones present in the blood rather than glycolysis, where the energy comes from glucose. People often land up in a dilemma while judging whether ketosis is safe during pregnancy or not. The diet of a woman has to undergo certain changes in case she nears pregnancy. However, you should be aware of the effects of ketosis before you opt for such a diet. The body of a woman undergoes a lot of changes during pregnancy. Food choices are important when she tries to conceive. Here, you will have a detailed information about ketosis before and during pregnancy. Ketosis before Pregnancy Although people think that ketosis during pregnancy is harmful, in reality, it can help you get pregnant. If you want to draw your energy from ketone particles, you should plan a ketogenic diet. For an ordinary person, it is safe and even women trying to get pregnant can stick to such a meal. These meals are low-carb diets, and people can switch to these diets when they get pregnant. Well, it is important to know that ketosis is safe before you get pregnant. However, the norms are a bit different during pregnancy and you should stick to the rules. Read on to know whether it is safe during pregnancy or not. If you had heard that ketosis is harmful during pregnancy, you might be confusing it with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This is completely different from ketosis that we are speaking of here. DKA has no relevance with nutritional ketosis and it is a far more harmful syndrome. It occurs in diabetic people where the level of insulin is not managed properly. It disrupts the balance of acid and base in the body. The level of blood sugar in the case of DKA is around three times the normal conditions. This situation Continue reading >>

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