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Why Is Ketoacidosis Life Threatening

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Case Report Severe Allergic Reaction To Human Insulin In The Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Case Report Severe Allergic Reaction To Human Insulin In The Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially fatal crisis of diabetes mellitus (DM). In the treatment of DKA, fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, and electrolyte replacement are important. Rarely, insulin allergies can be developed in the patient treated with insulin. The most common symptoms of insulin allergies are localized and limited. Life-threatening allergic reactions are rarely reported. Insulin allergies can be managed safely and successfully by desensitization treatment.1,2 We present treatment of a patient with DKA who developed an insulin allergy. In this case report, we aimed to discuss DKA treatment options in patient with insulin allergies. 2. Case report A 45-year-old male was brought to our emergency department with chest pain and hyperglycemia. He had a history of type 2 DM and had been using an oral antidiabetic drug for two years, but he had been stopped using for a month. HIs past medical history did not show any drug allergies. His vitals were measured: 1.) blood pressure of 166/98 mmHg; 2.) pulse 100/min; 3.) respiration number 24/min; 4.) O2 saturation 98%; and 5.) temperature 36.0 °C. His electrocardiograms (ECG's) were normal. His blood glucose level was 405 mg/dL, urinary ketones 15 mmol/L, pH was 6.8, HCO3 4.7 mmol/L, and lactate 3.6 mmol/L. Regular insulin (0.1unit/kg IV bolus) was initiated in addition to 2000 mL of intravenous saline, and a 0.1 unit/kg/hour infusion was started. He developed a generalized skin rash, hoarseness, and uvular edema at the 30th minute of treatment, which then expanded to the soft palate. The vital findings were normal except for the presence of tachycardia. At that moment his vitals were measured: 1.) blood pressure 126/75 mmHg; 2.) pulse 104/min; 3.) respiration number 24/min; 4.) O2 saturat Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Summarized from Nyenwe E, Kitabchi A. The evolution of diabetic ketoacidosis: An update of its etiology, pathogenesis and management. Metabolism 2016; 65: 507-21 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which is an acute, potentially life-threatening complication of poorly controlled diabetes, is the subject of a recent comprehensive review article. The authors discuss epidemiological issues, revealing increasing incidence of DKA and decreasing mortality. Once inevitably fatal, DKA now has a reported mortality rate of <1 % in adults and 5 % in the elderly who also have one or more chronic illnesses, in addition to diabetes. They reveal that although DKA more commonly affects those with type 1 diabetes, around a third of cases occur in those with type 2 diabetes. This introductory section also reminds that DKA is characterized by the presence of three cardinal biochemical features: raised blood glucose (hyperglycemia); presence of ketones in blood and urine (ketonemia, ketonuria); and metabolic acidosis. Insulin deficiency is central to the development of these three biochemical abnormalities. The very rare occurrence of euglycemic DKA (DKA with normal blood glucose) is highlighted by reference to recent reports of this condition in patients treated with a relatively new class of antidiabetic drug (the SGLT 2 inhibitors) that reduces blood glucose by inhibiting renal reabsorption of glucose. There follows discussion of factors that precipitate DKA (omission or inadequate dosing of insulin, and infection are the most common triggers), and the possible mechanisms responsible for ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes. This latter condition, which was recognized as an entity only relatively recently, is distinguished by the development of severe but transient failure of pancreatic β-cells to m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Danger: Warning Over Life-threatening Complications Ketoacidosis And Diabulimia

Diabetes Danger: Warning Over Life-threatening Complications Ketoacidosis And Diabulimia

The condition occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a potentially harmful by-product called ketones. It's fairly common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. “It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. NRS Healthcare has set out to raise awareness for people suffering with the condition and also highlight other issues including diabulimia, a recently reported condition where young people with diabetes choose not to take their insulin in order to lose weight. Alexandra Lomas, who is living with type 1 diabetes, has spoken out about how her delayed diagnosis led to her going through ketoacidosis and warned how young girls living with diabulimia risk experiencing the same horrific symptoms. “Before I had diabetes I had this long luscious thick hair, it was kind of like my crowning glory. “Six months leading up to my diagnosis I would be brushing my hair and pulling out these great big clumps of hair. “I lost six stone is as many months. I eventually lost so much weight that the sugar in my blood had started to eat away at my muscles. “Leading up to going into hospital was really really difficult. “When I got to the hospital they measured my heart rate and it was at 268 beats a minute - the normal rate is around 60 per minute. I felt like I was having a heart attack. “I recently read a story on diabulimia, where young girls across the UK aren’t taking their insulin as a type 1 diabetic in order to make their blood sugars rise and eat away at their fat and muscle and therefore they keep their weight down. “I wanted to make th Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

What is alcoholic ketoacidosis? Cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin to function properly. Glucose comes from the food you eat, and insulin is produced by the pancreas. When you drink alcohol, your pancreas may stop producing insulin for a short time. Without insulin, your cells won’t be able to use the glucose you consume for energy. To get the energy you need, your body will start to burn fat. When your body burns fat for energy, byproducts known as ketone bodies are produced. If your body is not producing insulin, ketone bodies will begin to build up in your bloodstream. This buildup of ketones can produce a life-threatening condition known as ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis, or metabolic acidosis, occurs when you ingest something that is metabolized or turned into an acid. This condition has a number of causes, including: shock kidney disease abnormal metabolism In addition to general ketoacidosis, there are several specific types. These types include: alcoholic ketoacidosis, which is caused by excessive consumption of alcohol diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which mostly develops in people with type 1 diabetes starvation ketoacidosis, which occurs most often in women who are pregnant, in their third trimester, and experiencing excessive vomiting Each of these situations increases the amount of acid in the system. They can also reduce the amount of insulin your body produces, leading to the breakdown of fat cells and the production of ketones. Alcoholic ketoacidosis can develop when you drink excessive amounts of alcohol for a long period of time. Excessive alcohol consumption often causes malnourishment (not enough nutrients for the body to function well). People who drink large quantities of alcohol may not eat regularly. They may also vomit as a result of drinking too Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs when the body does not have enough insulin. Insulin is what breaks down sugar into energy. When insulin is not present to break down sugars, our body begins to break down fat. Fat break down produces ketones which spill into the urine and cause glucose build up in the blood, thus acidifying the body. Because sugar is not entering into our body’s cells for energy breakdown, the sugar is being processed by the kidneys and excreted through the urine; as a result, we become dehydrated and our blood becomes even more acidic. This leads to sickness and hospitalization if not treated. If a person’s blood sugar is over 240, they should start checking their blood for ketones. If you have diabetes, or love someone who does, being aware of warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can help save a life. Early Symptoms of DKA: High blood glucose level, usually > 300 High volume to ketones present in blood or urine Frequent urination or thirst that lasts for a day or more Dry skin and mouth Rapid shallow breathing Abdominal pain (especially in children) Muscle stiffness or aches Flushed face As DKA Worsens: Decreases alertness, confusion – brain is dehydrating Deep, labored, and gasping breathing Headache Breath that smells fruity or like fingernail polish remover Nausea and/or vomiting Abdomen may be tender and hurt if touched Decreased consciousness, coma, death If you think you might have DKA, test for ketones. If ketones are present, call your health care provider right away. To treat high blood sugar, hydrate with water or sugar free, caffeine free drinks. Sugar free popsicles and snacks are also good alternatives. Always call the doctor if vomiting goes on for more than two hours. Symptoms can go from mild Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. It's important to seek medical advice quickly if you think that you or your child is experiencing the condition. Causes of diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that can occur if the body starts to run out of insulin. It's common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. Children and young adults are most at risk. Insulin enables the body to use blood sugar (glucose). If there is a lack of insulin, or if it can't be used properly, the body will break down fat instead. The breakdown of fat releases harmful, acidic substances called ketones.The lack of insulin in your body leads to high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). The combination of high ketone and blood sugar levels can cause a number of symptoms that can be very serious if the levels aren't corrected quickly. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis The initial symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis can develop quite suddenly. They will continue to get worse if not treated. Early symptoms In the early stages, the main signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine severe thirst weight loss feeling sick tiredness You may also develop other symptoms of dehydration, such as a dry mouth. If you have your own device or kit to measure your blood sugar and/or ketone levels, you may notice that the levels of both of these are higher than normal. Advanced symptoms Left untreated, more advanced symptoms can develop, including: rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) rapid breathing, where you breathe in more oxygen than your body actua Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis, also referred to as simply ketoacidosis or DKA, is a serious and even life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes. DKA is rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA is caused when insulin levels are low and not enough glucose can get into the body's cells. Without glucose for energy, the body starts to burn fat for energy. Ketones are products that are created when the body burns fat. The buildup of ketones causes the blood to become more acidic. The high levels of blood glucose in DKA cause the kidneys to excrete glucose and water, leading to dehydration and imbalances in body electrolyte levels. Diabetic ketoacidosis most commonly develops either due to an interruption in insulin treatment or a severe illness, including the flu. What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The development of DKA is usually a slow process. However, if vomiting develops, the symptoms can progress more rapidly due to the more rapid loss of body fluid. Excessive urination, which occurs because the kidneys try to rid the body of excess glucose, and water is excreted along with the glucose High blood glucose (sugar) levels The presence of ketones in the urine Other signs and symptoms of ketoacidosis occur as the condition progresses: These include: Fatigue, which can be severe Flushing of the skin Fruity odor to the breath, caused by ketones Difficulty breathing Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication What should I do if I think I may have, or someone I know may diabetic ketoacidosis? You should test your urine for ketones if you suspect you have early symptoms or warning signs of ketoacidosis. Call your health-care professional if your urine shows high levels of ketones. High levels of ketones and high blood sug Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic ketoacidosis definition and facts Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes (though rare, it can occur in people with type 2 diabetes) that occurs when the body produces high levels of ketones due to lack of insulin. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. The signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include Risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis are type 1 diabetes, and missing insulin doses frequently, or being exposed to a stressor requiring higher insulin doses (infection, etc). Diabetic ketoacidosis is diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar (glucose) level, elevated blood ketones and acidity of the blood (acidosis). The treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis is insulin, fluids and electrolyte therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be prevented by taking insulin as prescribed and monitoring glucose and ketone levels. The prognosis for a person with diabetic ketoacidosis depends on the severity of the disease and the other underlying medical conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe and life-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the cells in our body do not receive the sugar (glucose) they need for energy. This happens while there is plenty of glucose in the bloodstream, but not enough insulin to help convert glucose for use in the cells. The body recognizes this and starts breaking down muscle and fat for energy. This breakdown produces ketones (also called fatty acids), which cause an imbalance in our electrolyte system leading to the ketoacidosis (a metabolic acidosis). The sugar that cannot be used because of the lack of insulin stays in the bloodstream (rather than going into the cell and provide energy). The kidneys filter some of the glucose (suga Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Rapid, deep breathing. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. Confusion. Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some test strips nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high. When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through your vein and closely watching certain chemicals in your blood (electrolyt Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Simulator: A New Learning Tool For A Life Threatening Condition

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Simulator: A New Learning Tool For A Life Threatening Condition

Isabel Huguet, J Joaquín Alfaro, César Gonzalvo, Cristina Lamas, Antonio Hernández & Francisco Botella Introduction: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) remains a life threatening complication in type 1 diabetes. Appropiate initial management is crucial in the evolution of this complex condition, and mistakes in the treatment are not uncommon. Medical simulation technology is a powerful tool for training physicians but papers dealing with DKA simulators are scarce. We introduce a new simulator designed in our institution aimed to junior doctors’ training in DKA treatment whose implementation permits physicians to solve more case than what they would manage in the Emergency Room. Material and methods: A software was developed by using mathematic algorithms based in previously published and empiric formulas to simulate the evolution of DKA both under appropriate and inappropriate management. Results: The DKA simulator shows several cases to the trainee. Every case is compound by a clinical history and some variables which define the basal situation of the simulated patient: sex, age, weight, glucose, 3-β-OH-butyrate, sodium, potassium, serum creatinine, renal function, grade of dehydration, insulin sensitivity and ability to hyperventilation. The last four parameters are not shown to the trainee, but used by the simulator. The trainee has to indicate the initial management, ask for biochemical test when necessary, and make successive changes in the treatment (iv insulin rate, type and rate of fluidotherapy and potassium administered) until DKA resolution is reached or, eventually, the death of the patient happens if the management has not been correct. By using mathematical algorithms, and according to the characteristics and the duration of the treatment, our simulator pro Continue reading >>

A Possible Hypophosphatemia-induced, Life-threatening Encephalopathy In Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report

A Possible Hypophosphatemia-induced, Life-threatening Encephalopathy In Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report

ABSTRACT Hypophosphatemia, a common metabolic disorder, is usually silent and diagnosed by blood tests. However, misdiagnosis may result in delayed phosphate repletion, responsible for significant morbidity and potential mortality. We report an exceptional case of hypophosphatemia-related, life-threatening encephalopathy. A 49-year-old type-1 diabetic woman was admitted to our intensive care unit with coma and severe ketoacidosis. Initial neurologic impairment worsened despite improvement in acid-base disturbances and glucose levels. The electroencephalogram showed bilateral spikes with a background theta wave rhythm. Profound hypophosphatemia <0.20 mmol/L (<0.6 mg/dL) was diagnosed. No other cause of encephalopathy was found. Prompt phosphate repletion resulted in progressive and complete recovery. This observation allowed us to study the relations between the coma depth, the electroencephalographs findings, and the serum phosphate concentrations. Our data strongly suggest that phosphate depletion–induced encephalopathy probably originates from direct impairment of cerebral electrophysiological activity rather than from cardiac flow alteration. Continue reading >>

Electrolyte Imbalance In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Electrolyte Imbalance In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

If you have diabetes, it's important to be familiar with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when lack of insulin and high blood sugar lead to potentially life-threatening chemical imbalances. The good news is DKA is largely preventable. Although DKA is more common with type 1 diabetes, it can also occur with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar causes excessive urination and spillage of sugar into the urine. This leads to loss of body water and dehydration as well as loss of important electrolytes, including sodium and potassium. The level of another electrolyte, bicarbonate, also falls as the body tries to compensate for excessively acidic blood. Video of the Day Insulin helps blood sugar move into cells, where it is used for energy production. When insulin is lacking, cells must harness alternative energy by breaking down fat. Byproducts of this alternative process are called ketones. High concentrations of ketones acidify the blood, hence the term "ketoacidosis." Acidosis causes unpleasant symptoms like nausea, vomiting and rapid breathing. Bicarbonate is an electrolyte that normally counteracts blood acidity. In DKA, the bicarbonate level falls as ketone production increases and acidosis progresses. Treatment of DKA includes prompt insulin supplementation to lower blood sugar, which leads to gradual restoration of the bicarbonate level. Potassium may be low in DKA because this electrolyte is lost due to excessive urination or vomiting. When insulin is used to treat DKA, it can further lower the blood potassium by pushing it into cells. Symptoms associated with low potassium include fatigue, muscle weakness, muscle cramps and an irregular heart rhythm. Severely low potassium can lead to life-threatening heart rhythm abnorm Continue reading >>

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells with an alternative energy source, the body breaks down adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids (FFAs) into the bloodstream. The liver subsequently converts FFAs to triglycerides and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies (i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid, b-hydroxybutyric acid) can be used as energy by the tissues when there is a lack of glucose or nutritional intake.1,2 The breakdown of fat, combined with the body's inability to use glucose, causes many pets with diabetes to present with weight loss, despite having a ravenous appetite. If diabetes is undiagnosed or uncontrolled, a series of metab Continue reading >>

A To Z: Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A To Z: Diabetic Ketoacidosis

May also be called: DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (kee-toh-ah-sih-DOH-sis) is a life-threatening condition that happens when the body uses fat for energy instead of glucose. More to Know Glucose (a type of sugar) is the body's main energy source. But when the body can't use glucose for fuel — for instance, in someone with uncontrolled diabetes — the body breaks down fat for energy instead. When fat is broken down, the body produces chemicals called ketones, which appear in the blood and urine (pee). High levels of ketones cause blood to have a high acid level. Keep in Mind Diabetic ketoacidosis is life threatening and requires immediate medical evaluation and treatment. All A to Z dictionary entries are regularly reviewed by KidsHealth medical experts. Continue reading >>

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