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Why Is Dka An Emergency

Diabetic Emergencies, Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults, Part 3

Diabetic Emergencies, Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults, Part 3

Clinical Management Treatment consists of rehydration with intravenous fluids, the administration of insulin, and replacement of electrolytes. General medical care and close supervision by trained medical and nursing staff is of paramount importance in the management of patients with DKA. A treatment flowchart (Table 1.3) should be used and updated meticulously. A urine catheter is necessary if the patient is in coma or if no urine is passed in the first 4 hours…. Replacement of water deficit Patients with DKA have severe dehydration. The amount of fluid needing to be administered depends on the degree of dehydration (Table 1.4). Fluid replacement aims at correction of the volume deficit and not to restore serum osmolality to normal. Isotonic solution NaCl (0.9%) (normal saline; osmolality 308 mOsm/kg) should be administered even in patients with high serum osmolality since this solution is hypotonic compared to the extracellular fluid of the patient. 10 The initial rate of fluid administration depends on the degree of volume depletion and underlying cardiac and renal function. In a young adult with normal cardiac and/or renal function 1 L of normal saline is administered intravenously within the first half- to one hour. In the second hour administer another 1 L, and between the third and the fifth hours administer 0.5–1 L per hour. Thus, the total volume in the first 5 hours should be 3.5–5 L [1]. If the patient is in shock or blood pressure does not respond to normal saline infusion, colloid solutions together with normal saline may be used.1,6 Some authors suggest replacement of normal saline with hypotonic (0.45%) saline solution after stabilization of the hemodynamic status of the patient and when corrected serum sodium levels are normal.8 However, this appro Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Emergency Department And Hospital: Acute Care Of Diabetes Patients

Diabetes In The Emergency Department And Hospital: Acute Care Of Diabetes Patients

Go to: Hyperglycemic Crisis: DKA and HHS Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) accounts for more than 110,000 hospitalizations annually in the United States, with mortality ranging from 2 to 10%4–6. Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) is much less common but confers a much greater mortality7. Patients with DKA classically present with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased total body ketone concentration. On the other hand, HHS is defined by altered mental status caused by hyperosmolality, profound dehydration, and severe hyperglycemia without significant ketoacidosis6,8. Initial evaluation In the Emergency Department, the primary goals are rapid evaluation and stabilization. All patients with severe hyperglycemia should immediately undergo assessment and stabilization of their airway and hemodynamic status, with consideration of administration of naloxone for all patients with altered mentation to reverse potential opiate overdose, and thiamine for all patients at risk for Wernicke’s encephalopathy. In cases requiring intubation, the paralytic succinylcholine should not be used if hyperkalemia is suspected as it may acutely further elevate potassium. Immediate assessment should also include placing patients on oxygen, measure O2 saturation and cardiac monitoring as well as obtaining vital signs, a fingerstick glucose, intravenous (IV) access, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram to evaluate for arrhythmias and signs of hyper-and hypokalemia. Emergency Department evaluation should include a thorough clinical history and physical examination, as well as a venous blood gas,9,10 complete blood count, basic metabolic panel, and urinalysis; a urine pregnancy test must be sent for all women with childbearing potential. An important goal of this evaluation is id Continue reading >>

What Was The Reason For Selecting The Number

What Was The Reason For Selecting The Number "911" As The Emergency Telephone Number For The North American Numbering Plan?

911 came into use in the United States for the first time in 1968. One factor which led to this specific number series is that the digital phone came into use in the mid 1960's. The three digits of 9-1-1 were each chosen for specific reasons. The first digit is 9. The main reason that it was chosen was since most large business phone systems required one to dial a number for an outside line use, and a 9 is more often than not the number that you needed to dial. It was theorized that it would be faster, easier, and most efficient to make the first digit a 9 so that the caller could simply dial the same number twice. Also, since the British version of 999 already existed, the idea of using the 9 was kind of borrowed. The second digit is a 1. There was temptation to model after Britain who had been using 999 since 1937. The main reason for the use of the 1 (instead of a 9) is because it is exactly opposite from the 9 on the digital phone layout making it easy to find even in the dark. There was a concern that use of a repeating number series like 999 might lead to callers inadvertently bumping one button multiple times (namely the 9) when they were not even trying to call for aid. I guess 1968 foresaw the problem of "butt-dialing", and this was their way of trying to mitigate that problem. The last 1 was chosen because it was in the same place as the second 1. The originators avoided using more than 2 different digits out of concern so that the caller would not have to hunt for three different digits. It was seen as quick and easy to double dial the 1 digit for the second and third digit. This is the same thinking for calling from and office where the caller would dial "9-9-1-1". Another reason that 1 was chosen over any other number relates to the rotary phone which was s Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an emergency medical condition that can be life-threatening if not treated properly. The incidence of this condition may be increasing, and a 1 to 2 percent mortality rate has stubbornly persisted since the 1970s. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs most often in patients with type 1 diabetes (formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus); however, its occurrence in patients with type 2 diabetes (formerly called non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), particularly obese black patients, is not as rare as was once thought. The management of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis includes obtaining a thorough but rapid history and performing a physical examination in an attempt to identify possible precipitating factors. The major treatment of this condition is initial rehydration (using isotonic saline) with subsequent potassium replacement and low-dose insulin therapy. The use of bicarbonate is not recommended in most patients. Cerebral edema, one of the most dire complications of diabetic ketoacidosis, occurs more commonly in children and adolescents than in adults. Continuous follow-up of patients using treatment algorithms and flow sheets can help to minimize adverse outcomes. Preventive measures include patient education and instructions for the patient to contact the physician early during an illness. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a triad of hyperglycemia, ketonemia and acidemia, each of which may be caused by other conditions (Figure 1).1 Although diabetic ketoacidosis most often occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes (formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), more recent studies suggest that it can sometimes be the presenting condition in obese black patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (formerly called non–insulin-depe Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Emergency Department

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Emergency Department

Diabetic ketoacidosis results from deficient insulin action and increased action of hormones such as catecholamines, glucagon, glucocorticoids, and growth hormone, which are produced during stress and which antagonize insulin's actions. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with a relatively high mortality rate. Treatment consists of appropriate fluid resuscitation, insulin infusion, adjustments of electrolytes and phosphate, and careful monitoring. The most common serious complication is cerebral edema. Continue reading >>

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially fatal metabolic disorder presenting most weeks in most accident and emergency (A&E) departments.1 The disorder can have significant mortality if misdiagnosed or mistreated. Numerous management strategies have been described. Our aim is to describe a regimen that is based, as far as possible, on available evidence but also on our experience in managing patients with DKA in the A&E department and on inpatient wards. A literature search was carried out on Medline and the Cochrane Databases using “diabetic ketoacidosis” as a MeSH heading and as textword. High yield journals were hand searched. Papers identified were appraised in the ways described in the Users’ guide series published in JAMA. We will not be discussing the derangements in intermediary metabolism involved, nor would we suggest extrapolating the proposed regimen to children. Although some of the issues discussed may be considered by some to be outwith the remit of A&E medicine it would seem prudent to ensure that A&E staff were aware of the probable management of such patients in the hours after they leave the A&E department. AETIOLOGY AND DEFINITION DKA may be the first presentation of diabetes. Insulin error (with or without intercurrent illness) is the most common precipitating factor, accounting for nearly two thirds of cases (excluding those where DKA was the first presentation of diabetes mellitus).2 The main features of DKA are hyperglycaemia, metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap and heavy ketonuria (box 1). This contrasts with the other hyperglycaemic diabetic emergency of hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycaemia where there is no acidosis, absent or minimal ketonuria but often very high glucose levels (>33 mM) and very high serum sodium levels (>15 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Assessing Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Emergency Department

Assessing Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Emergency Department

When hyperglycemic patients present to the emergency department, it is common practice to evaluate them for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) using both venous blood gas (VBG) and serum chemistry results. Within the past several years, however, many labs have implemented blood gas analyzers that report not only standard VBG measurements but also electrolyte results typically provided through serum chemistry panels. This prompted researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) to evaluate the performance of VBG electrolytes in comparison to standard serum chemistry results. Their findings are the subject of this issue of Strategies. Amidst the rising tide of diabetes and diabetic complications, emergency physicians typically assess hyperglycemic patients for DKA when their triage blood glucose is ≥250 mg/dL, regardless of the purpose for their visit. American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria for DKA include serum glucose ≥250 mg/dL, serum anion gap >10 mEq/L, bicarbonate ≤18 mEq/L, serum pH ≤7.30, and presence of ketosis. In the past, measuring these parameters required both venous blood gas and serum chemistry results. Today, many labs have implemented blood gas analyzers that report not only standard VBG measurements such as serum pH and bicarbonate, but also analytes like sodium, potassium, and glucose. Having observed that these parameters were available via VBG, USC researchers sought to evaluate their performance in comparison to standard serum chemistry results with the idea that if the methods were comparable they might be able to use only the VBG results (Acad Emerg Med 2011;18:1105-8). “The emergency environment is very challenging due to crowding, so we’re constantly looking for processes that improve our throughput. One doesn’t think of Continue reading >>

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Selected References These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Articles from Emergency Medicine Journal : EMJ are provided here courtesy of BMJ Publishing Group Continue reading >>

What Are The Common Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

What Are The Common Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes?

India is the diabetes capital of the world. Type 2 diabetes or insulin resistant diabetes is a silent killer. Many people never realize they have diabetes before significant organ damage occurs. The common signs and symptoms include Obesity especially truncal (around the waist or pot belly) is a high risk factor. Polyuria or excessive urination because glucose acts like an osmotic agent in kidney pulling water out. Nocturia or desire to pass urine in night secondary to polyuria. Polydypsia or excessive thirst due to loss of water in urine. Excessive hunger(polyphagia) Some people can also have weight loss. Poor wound healing Fatigue In late stages Visual loss due to retinal damage Kidney failure and hypertension due to kidney damage. Leg ulcers and gangrene due to poor wound healing. Diabetes is an independent risk factor for heart attack and stroke (metabolic syndrome). Diabetics are also more prone for cancers. Diabetic keto acidosis (DKA) is a life threatening medical emergency caused by very high sugar and dehydration. Patient can become comatose, have seizures and have rapid breathing. Many diabetics discontinue medications abruptly without their doctors advice as their blood sugars become normal. These patients may come to the emergency with DKA. Prediabetes or mild diabetes can be controlled with diet and excercise and weight loss. A recent study showed losing 15 kg weight can completely reverse diabetes. Continue reading >>

Ebm Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Ebm Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Epidemiology New diagnosis of diabetes 10-27%. Infection ~ 35%, inadequate insulin ~ 30%, surgery, trauma, alcohol, cocaine and drugs such as steroids, thiazides, sympathomimetics, pentamidine. No cause in 19-38%, but poor compliance / economic reasons frequent. Mortality 1% in adults, but 5% if over 65 years. Also high 15% in patients with hyperglycaemic, hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome (HHNS), when BSL usually > 50 mmol/L, more dehydrated with osmolality is > 320 mosm/L – can calculate latter by (2[NA + K] + glucose). Diagnostic Criteria Raised glucose >11.1 mmol/L Acidosis with arterial / venous pH < 7.3, or venous bicarb < 15 mmol/L Ketonaemia or ketonuria (urinalysis may miss 3-beta hydroxybutyrate early). Management / Complications Hypoperfusion Rapid initial crystalloid, especially for significant circulatory insufficiency, at 15-20 mL/kg in first hour ie. 1-1.5 L. Possible role for bicarbonate is in patients with impending cardiovascular collapse, if pH < 6.9. Dilute 100 mmol 8.4% bicarbonate in 250-1000 mL 0.45% NS, and give over 30-60 minutes with 20 mmol K via infusion pump. (Note there are no prospective data concerning bicarbonate use below pH 6.9, and from 6.9-7.1 morbidity and mortality outcomes are equivocal ie. not proven). Fluid replacement Total body water deficit 100 mL/kg, and sodium deficit 7-10 mmol/kg. Restore normal hydration with 0.9% NS at 4-14 mL/kg/hr, to correct estimated fluid deficit over first 24 hours, without exceeding change in osmolality greater than 3 mOsm/kg per hour. One regime is NS 1000 mL in first hour, 500 mL/hr next 4 hours, then 250 mL/hr next 4 hours ie. around 4 L in first 9 hours. Aim to restore fluid deficits over 24 hours in adults, or up to 48 hours in children. Insulin infusion Insulin infusion at 0.1 units/kg/hr Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can occur in diabetes. DKA happens when acidic substances, called ketones, build up in your body. Ketones are formed when your body burns fat for fuel instead of sugar, or glucose. That can happen if you don’t have enough insulin in your body to help you process sugars. Learn more: Ketosis vs. ketoacidosis: What you should know » Left untreated, ketones can build up to dangerous levels. DKA can occur in people who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but it’s rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA can also develop if you are at risk for diabetes, but have not received a formal diagnosis. It can be the first sign of type 1 diabetes. DKA is a medical emergency. Call your local emergency services immediately if you think you are experiencing DKA. Symptoms of DKA can appear quickly and may include: frequent urination extreme thirst high blood sugar levels high levels of ketones in the urine nausea or vomiting abdominal pain confusion fruity-smelling breath a flushed face fatigue rapid breathing dry mouth and skin It is important to make sure you consult with your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. If left untreated, DKA can lead to a coma or death. All people who use insulin should discuss the risk of DKA with their healthcare team, to make sure a plan is in place. If you think you are experiencing DKA, seek immediate medical help. Learn more: Blood glucose management: Checking for ketones » If you have type 1 diabetes, you should maintain a supply of home urine ketone tests. You can use these to test your ketone levels. A high ketone test result is a symptom of DKA. If you have type 1 diabetes and have a glucometer reading of over 250 milligrams per deciliter twice, you should test your urine for keton Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

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