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Why Is Bicarbonate Low In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

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Sodium Bicarbonate Is Beneficial In Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sodium Bicarbonate Is Beneficial in Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis In their recent review, 1 Aschner and Poland wrote that clinicians should resist the common impulse to administer bicarbonate to infants with metabolic acidosis . Instead, they should concentrate their efforts on understanding and treating the underlying cause of the acidosis.1(p835) However, in the Basic' Facts on Use for Neonatal Metabolic Acidosis section,1(p833) they did not discuss the question of whether metabolic acidosis (ie, low blood pH) is dangerous. According to Edge et al, 2 very low blood pH is the cause of coma: the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase is pH dependent, 3 as its activity is decreasing with decreasing pH; thus, glucose use in brain cells is impaired. Therefore, the clinical consequences of decreasing blood pH are drowsiness, stupor, coma, and death in coma. The authors also wrote, Metabolic acidosis is a common finding in NICUs,1(p833) probably also with very low blood pH (<7.00). It would be interesting to know what the outcome was of newborn infants with such a low blood pH with and without bicarbonate therapy. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Knicks

    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment.

  2. generic

    The HCO3 derangement is not a compensation--it is the primary problem.
    DKA patients have a metabolic acidosis, I think it's mostly caused by the formation of tons and tons of ketone bodies (acidic). These are formed because despite high circulating levels of glucose, the cells can't use the glucose without insulin-->turn to ketone formation instead.
    The metabolic acidosis may cause respiratory compensation, which would give Kussmaul breathing, for example.

  3. treva

    Knicks said: ↑
    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment. Remember the kidney takes days to compensate for acidodic state by producing more bicarb. Acutely, the bicarb is used to buffer the extra acid, so it drops.
    This also explains why DKA pts have increased RR:
    CO2 + H20 <--> H2CO3 <--> HCO3- + H+
    If you blow off extra CO2 (ie by upping RR) you shift the above equation to the left, and promote the formation of H2CO3 via CA, helping to mop up the H+.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Should I Give Bicarbonate In Dka?

Should I give bicarbonate to DKA patients with severe acidemia? Ive certainly been admonished for NOT doing it. The reason for withholding bicarb has been that Ive heard that it doesnt help and may actually be a bad idea. I cant say the action (or inaction) was based on a deep understanding. How could bicarb in DKA be a bad idea if even the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends we give a bicarb to DKA patients with pH under 6.9? The argument in favor of giving bicarb is that the more acidemic the patient, the higher the risk of circulatory collapse and cardiac arrest. Even though there is no evidence of benefit, the ADA gives a very specific set of steps to take in the low pH patient.. Because severe acidosis may lead to numerous adverse vascular effects, it is recommended that adult patients with a pH less than 6.9 should receive bicarbonate. Specially 100 mmol sodium bicarbonate, two ampules, in 400 mL sterile water with 20 mEq KCL admitted at a rate of 200ml/hr for 2 hours until the venous pH is over 7. If the ph isnt over 7 at that point, they say repeat the bicarb infusion every 2 hours until the ph is over 7.0 With that sort of exact guidance, youd think there would Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Knicks

    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment.

  2. generic

    The HCO3 derangement is not a compensation--it is the primary problem.
    DKA patients have a metabolic acidosis, I think it's mostly caused by the formation of tons and tons of ketone bodies (acidic). These are formed because despite high circulating levels of glucose, the cells can't use the glucose without insulin-->turn to ketone formation instead.
    The metabolic acidosis may cause respiratory compensation, which would give Kussmaul breathing, for example.

  3. treva

    Knicks said: ↑
    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment. Remember the kidney takes days to compensate for acidodic state by producing more bicarb. Acutely, the bicarb is used to buffer the extra acid, so it drops.
    This also explains why DKA pts have increased RR:
    CO2 + H20 <--> H2CO3 <--> HCO3- + H+
    If you blow off extra CO2 (ie by upping RR) you shift the above equation to the left, and promote the formation of H2CO3 via CA, helping to mop up the H+.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
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Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Twenty-one adult patients with severe diabetic ketoacidosis entered a randomized prospective protocol in which variable doses of sodium bicarbonate, based on initial arterial pH (6.9 to 7.14), were administered to 10 patients (treatment group) and were withheld from 11 patients (control group). During treatment, there were no significant differences in the rate of decline of glucose or ketone levels or in the rate of increase in pH or bicarbonate levels in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid in either group. Similarly, there were no significant differences in the time required for the plasma glucose level to reach 250 mg/dL, blood pH to reach 7.3, or bicarbonate level to reach 15 meq/L. We conclude that in severe diabetic ketoacidosis (arterial pH 6.9 to 7.14), the administration of bicarbonate does not affect recovery outcome variables as compared with those in a control group. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Knicks

    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment.

  2. generic

    The HCO3 derangement is not a compensation--it is the primary problem.
    DKA patients have a metabolic acidosis, I think it's mostly caused by the formation of tons and tons of ketone bodies (acidic). These are formed because despite high circulating levels of glucose, the cells can't use the glucose without insulin-->turn to ketone formation instead.
    The metabolic acidosis may cause respiratory compensation, which would give Kussmaul breathing, for example.

  3. treva

    Knicks said: ↑
    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment. Remember the kidney takes days to compensate for acidodic state by producing more bicarb. Acutely, the bicarb is used to buffer the extra acid, so it drops.
    This also explains why DKA pts have increased RR:
    CO2 + H20 <--> H2CO3 <--> HCO3- + H+
    If you blow off extra CO2 (ie by upping RR) you shift the above equation to the left, and promote the formation of H2CO3 via CA, helping to mop up the H+.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

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