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Why Does Potassium Increase In Acidosis?

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CONTACT US:- E-mail ID for free online consultation - [email protected], Phone: +91-172-521-4030, WhatsApp: 8427864030 DESCRIPTION:- Choose fruits and vegetables that are lower in potassium because when you have kidney disease, the kidneys aren't as effective at removing excess potassium from the blood. Read more about diet in ckd - http://www.planetayurveda.com/diet_ki...

Potassium And Acidosis

Balance among electrically charged atoms and molecules is essential to maintaining chemical equilibrium in your body. Potassium is the most abundant, positively charged atom inside your cells. Because acids and potassium both have a positive electrical charge in your body, their concentrations are interdependent. Medical conditions that cause an overabundance of acids in your blood, known as acidosis, may affect your blood potassium level, and vice versa. Video of the Day Metabolic acidosis is an abnormally low blood pH caused by overproduction of acids or failure of your kidneys to rid the body of acids normally. With metabolic acidosis, your blood has an abnormally high level of positively charged hydrogen atoms, or hydrogen ions. To reduce the acidity of your blood, hydrogen ions move from your circulation into your cells in exchange for potassium. The exchange of hydrogen for potassium ions helps relieve the severity of acidosis but may cause an abnormally high level of blood potassium, or hyperkalemia. Drs. Kimberley Evans and Arthur Greenberg reported in a September 2005 article published in the "Journal of Intensive Care Medicine" that there is a 0.3 to 1.3 mmol/L increase i Continue reading >>

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  1. Fry

    To my knowledge this has been demonstrated in mice. Mice that were not necessarily fed a healthy diet and that are mice and not as likely to eat that kind of diet like humans are in nature, for the past hundred thousand years.
    However of all the studies in humans, while there have been some negative ones showing arterial stiffness or other issues, there have been none, that I know of, showing the diet to cause insulin resistance and several that showed increased insulin sensitivity.
    I have read that while in ketosis one will develop insulin resistance but it is a temporary and necessary response by your body to ensure that your brain gets enough glucose and, most importantly, that this resistance is completely reversible and sensitivity will go back up if/when one started eating carbs again.

    Does anyone know? Studies? Science?

  2. brownfat

    Blood glucose tracking can give a good sense of changing insulin resistance. If over time on the diet your fasted bg is falling and/or your post prandial bg rise to a particular food diminishes then you are likely becoming more insulin sensitive. Fasting should help.

  3. VLC.MD

    A foundational principle of low carb diets is that they lower insulin resistance in humans.

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In this video, I am sharing with you the stocking stuffers that we bought for Andrew, Ashley, and Christina's Christmas stockings. Music Credit: "Deck The Halls" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Other Places To Find Us: Address: PO Box 4773 Winchester, KY 40392 Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tamisclock?ty=h Tamis Snapchat: tamisclock Tamis Twitter: https://twitter.com/tamisclock Tamis Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/tamisclock/ Tamis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tamisclock/ Tamis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tamidunnyoutube Tamis Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TamiDunn/posts Kevins Lunchtime Review: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRU5... Kevins Gaming & Lecturing Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGgx... Kevins Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/moviehq/ Kevins Twitter: https://twitter.com/MovieHQ Kevins Google+: https://plus.google.com/+MovieHQ/videos Dunn Family Bloopers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdjZm... Dunn Family Bloopers Part II https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXQ5v... Dunn Family Bloopers Part III https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Blfg4... Ashl

Effects Of Ph On Potassium: New Explanations For Old Observations

Go to: Abstract Maintenance of extracellular K+ concentration within a narrow range is vital for numerous cell functions, particularly electrical excitability of heart and muscle. Potassium homeostasis during intermittent ingestion of K+ involves rapid redistribution of K+ into the intracellular space to minimize increases in extracellular K+ concentration, and ultimate elimination of the K+ load by renal excretion. Recent years have seen great progress in identifying the transporters and channels involved in renal and extrarenal K+ homeostasis. Here we apply these advances in molecular physiology to understand how acid-base disturbances affect serum potassium. The effects of acid-base balance on serum potassium are well known.1 Maintenance of extracellular K+ concentration within a narrow range is vital for numerous cell functions, particularly electrical excitability of heart and muscle.2 However, maintenance of normal extracellular K+ (3.5 to 5 mEq/L) is under two potential threats. First, as illustrated in Figure 1, because some 98% of the total body content of K+ resides within cells, predominantly skeletal muscle, small acute shifts of intracellular K+ into or out of the extr Continue reading >>

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  1. manohman

    Why can't fat be converted into Glucose?

    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?

  2. Czarcasm

    manohman said: ↑
    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?
    Click to expand... Both glucose and fatty acids can be stored in the body as either glycogen for glucose (stored mainly in the liver or skeletal cells) or for FA's, as triacylglycerides (stored in adipose cells). We cannot store excess protein. It's either used to make other proteins, or flushed out of the body if in excess; that's generally the case but we try to make use of some of that energy instead of throwing it all away.
    When a person is deprived of nutrition for a period of time and glycogen stores are depleted, the body will immediately seek out alternative energy sources. Fats (stored for use) are the first priority over protein (which requires the breakdown of tissues such as muscle). We can mobilize these FA's to the liver and convert them to Acetyl-CoA to be used in the TCA cycle and generate much needed energy. On the contrary, when a person eats in excess (a fatty meal high in protein), it's more efficient to store fatty acids as TAG's over glycogen simply because glycogen is extremely hydrophilic and attracts excess water weight; fatty acids are largely stored anhydrously and so you essentially get more bang for your buck. This is evolutionary significant and why birds are able to stay light weight but fly for periods at a time, or why bears are able to hibernate for months at a time. Proteins on the other hand may be used anabolically to build up active tissues (such as when your working out those muscles), unless you live a sedentary lifestyle (less anabolism and therefore, less use of the proteins). As part of the excretion process, protein must be broken down to urea to avoid toxic ammonia and in doing so, the Liver can extract some of that usable energy for storage as glycogen.
    Also, it is worth noting that it is indeed possible to convert FA's to glucose but the pathway can be a little complex and so in terms of energy storage, is not very efficient. The process involves converting Acetyl-CoA to Acetone (transported out of mitochondria to cytosol) where it's converted to Pyruvate which can then be used in the Gluconeogenesis pathway to make Glucose and eventually stored as Glycogen. Have a look for yourself if your interested: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116.g003/originalimage (and this excludes the whole glycogenesis pathway, which hasn't even begun yet).
    TLDR: it's because proteins have no ability to be stored in the body, but we can convert them to glycogen for storage during the breakdown process for excretion. Also, in terms of energy, it's a more efficient process than converting FA's to glycogen for storage.

  3. soccerman93

    This is where biochem comes in handy. Czarcasm gives a really good in depth answer, but a simpler approach is to count carbons. The first step of gluconeogenesis(formation of glucose) requires pyruvate, a 3 carbon molecule. Acetyl Co-A is a 2 carbon molecule, and most animals lack the enzymes (malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) required to convert acetyl co-A into a 3 carbon molecule suitable for the gluconeogenesis pathway. The ketogenic pathway is not efficient, as czarcasm pointed out. While acetyl co-A can indeed be used to form citric acid intermediates, these intermediates will be used in forming ATP, not glucose. Fatty acid oxidation does not yield suitable amounts of pyruvate, which is required for gluconeogenesis. This is part of why losing weight is fairly difficult for those that are overweight, we can't efficiently directly convert fat to glucose, which we need a fairly constant supply of. Sorry, that got a little long-winded

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Practice Essentials Metabolic acidosis is a clinical disturbance characterized by an increase in plasma acidity. Metabolic acidosis should be considered a sign of an underlying disease process. Identification of this underlying condition is essential to initiate appropriate therapy. (See Etiology, DDx, Workup, and Treatment.) Understanding the regulation of acid-base balance requires appreciation of the fundamental definitions and principles underlying this complex physiologic process. Go to Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis and Emergent Management of Metabolic Acidosis for complete information on those topics. Continue reading >>

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  1. abuvia

    So, I'm coming up on that dreaded "time of the month." In the past (and on regular calorie-restricted diets) this usually causes my progress to stall or, due to extra hunger, leads to weight gain.
    I'm wondering if things will be different on NK. So, what effects of AF have you noticed while on a keto diet? Any change to PMS or other symptoms? Any change in appetite or energy? Has it stalled your loss?
    Also, anything special I can do to stay on track during the next week or so?
    Thx!

  2. Patience

    AF?

  3. EricaHV

    Hi!
    I am wondering the same. I am on my period right now, and it seems to be making everything wonky. I still lost but only 1 lb, and when I checked my blood ketones I got .8, and even after working out for 2 hours I got .7 ! (I had to try again!)
    Is AF Adrenal Fatigue ?

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