diabetestalk.net

Why Does Ketosis Suppress Appetite

A Doctor On Why Ketosis Helps You Reduce Cravings & Hunger

A Doctor On Why Ketosis Helps You Reduce Cravings & Hunger

Kim Crawford, M.D., ABAARM If you're embarking on a weight-loss journey, chances are you'll run into the nutritional ketosis diet. But have you ever wondered if (and why) ketosis can help you lose weight? First, let me assure you that it can. In fact, even mainstream doctors are suggesting ketogenic diets for an entire host of patients, including those with metabolic syndrome. The beauty of the standard ketogenic diet—which consists of about 70 to 80 percent healthy fats, 10 to 20 percent protein, and 5 percent carbohydrates—is that you will not feel hungry or deprived. Ketosis can also offer health benefits that stretch far beyond weight loss. This way of eating can be beneficial for people with mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer or for athletes looking to increase their athletic performance. Here's why the ketogenic diet is a good choice for weight loss and overall health: Ketosis is a great appetite suppressant; if you are eating a standard (high-carb) American diet, you have blood sugar swings that can cause bouts of intense hunger—sometimes within as little as two hours of eating a meal! When you enter ketosis and start burning fat for fuel, your blood sugar will stabilize at a lower, healthier level. The healthy fat will be metabolized into ketones by your liver, and that will suppress your hunger via several metabolic pathways. When it comes to most hunger pangs, we're talking about ghrelin, not leptin. Ghrelin is the main hunger hormone and increases appetite. When you eat, ghrelin levels drop, if you are overweight they won't drop as much as they should. When you start to lose weight on a non-ketotic diet, your body senses that it's being starved and ghrelin levels increase. This is one reason regular diets often fail. The good news if you're on a ketot Continue reading >>

Effect Of Ketosis On Appetite Hormones

Effect Of Ketosis On Appetite Hormones

One of the most remarkable clinical observations in people embarking on severely calorie-restricted ketogenic diets, is the almost complete lack of hunger that occurs within a few days of dieting. Although clinically well described, the biological basis for this “appetite suppressant” effect of ketosis is less well understood. Now, Priya Sumithran and colleagues from Melbourne University, Australia, in a paper published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, describe the hormonal alterations associated with weight loss induced by a ketogenic diet. Their study included 39 non-diabetic overweight or obese subjects who completed an 8-week ketogenic very-low-energy diet (VLED), followed by 2 weeks of reintroduction of foods. During the ketogenic VLED, subjects lost 13% of initial weight and fasting ketones (β-hydroxybutyrate) increased significantly as expected. This increase in ketones was accompanied with a suppression of the increase in ghrelin normally seen with weight loss. weight-reduced subjects also had significantly lower leptin, peptide YY, amylin and pancreatic polypeptide levels, compared with week 10 values. In contrast, Fasting GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 and CCK were not different in weight-reduced subjects between weeks 8 and 10. In addition subjective ratings of appetite were lower at week 8 than after refeeding. The authors describe their significant findings regarding the effect of ketosis on ghrelin as follows: “In mildly ketotic participants, the increase in the circulating concentration of ghrelin, a potent stimulator of appetite, which otherwise occurs as a result of diet-induced weight loss, was suppressed. The present findings are in keeping with a recent report of a 12-week carbohydrate-restricted diet, during which 28 overweight su Continue reading >>

Complete Lack Of Appetite While In Ketosis

Complete Lack Of Appetite While In Ketosis

I am just wondering how many other people have complete lack of appetite while in ketosis. I can go 4 days without eating anything. I've read to only eat when hungry so I haven't really been stressing about it. It's just that now my friends are worried about me and think I have had a relapse into an eating disorder that I had in the past. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb you will never lose belly fat. healthplus50.com What should I do? Force myself to eat to make my friends shut up or should I just keep doing what I'm doing now and that is to wait until I'm hungry? Continue reading >>

Do Ketogenic Diets Really Suppress Appetite? A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

Do Ketogenic Diets Really Suppress Appetite? A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis.

Abstract Very-low-energy diets (VLEDs) and ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets (KLCDs) are two dietary strategies that have been associated with a suppression of appetite. However, the results of clinical trials investigating the effect of ketogenic diets on appetite are inconsistent. To evaluate quantitatively the effect of ketogenic diets on subjective appetite ratings, we conducted a systematic literature search and meta-analysis of studies that assessed appetite with visual analogue scales before (in energy balance) and during (while in ketosis) adherence to VLED or KLCD. Individuals were less hungry and exhibited greater fullness/satiety while adhering to VLED, and individuals adhering to KLCD were less hungry and had a reduced desire to eat. Although these absolute changes in appetite were small, they occurred within the context of energy restriction, which is known to increase appetite in obese people. Thus, the clinical benefit of a ketogenic diet is in preventing an increase in appetite, despite weight loss, although individuals may indeed feel slightly less hungry (or more full or satisfied). Ketosis appears to provide a plausible explanation for this suppression of appetite. Future studies should investigate the minimum level of ketosis required to achieve appetite suppression during ketogenic weight loss diets, as this could enable inclusion of a greater variety of healthy carbohydrate-containing foods into the diet. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Signs & Appetite

Ketosis Signs & Appetite

Ketosis is a metabolic condition in which the body begins breaking down fats, thus releasing carbon fragments known as ketones from the liver. The liver produces ketones as a byproduct of breaking down fatty acids. When your body is in a state of ketosis, your appetite is typically reduced. For this reason, some diets -- such as a low-carbohydrate diet -- aim to trigger a state of ketosis in your body. If too many ketones are released, however, this can have harmful consequences. Video of the Day Having diabetes, not eating or eating a low carbohydrate diet can induce ketosis. This is because ketosis occurs when your body does not have or is not able to use glycogen, which is the body’s stored form of carbohydrate. Because your body does not have glycogen, it switches to its next option: burning fat. This fat releases ketones in the body, inducing a state of ketosis. Because ketones are sweet by nature, one sign of ketosis is fruity-smelling breath. Nausea, fatigue and water and muscle loss are other symptoms. Another sign is an initial boost in appetite, followed by a loss of appetite. This is because when ketosis is induced, this signals the body that it is in a state of starvation. The liver and stomach send signals to the brain that it is starving, and keeps you from feeling satiated. However, over time the body becomes accustomed to its fat burning mode and adapts. Your hunger is then reduced after about a two- to four-week time period. If you are trying to lose weight, inducing a state of ketosis and reducing your appetite can be beneficial. This is because ketosis does not completely reduce your appetite, but instead helps to reduce your cravings for food that can sometimes lead you to overeat. The heart, brain and other muscle tissues “prefer” to burn keto Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Ketosis: Ways To Suppress Appetite And Lose Weight

Weight Loss Ketosis: Ways To Suppress Appetite And Lose Weight

Weight loss ketosis has been a weight loss strategy that has been deemed suitable for most people who have been into different weight loss programs but failed to obtain their desired outcomes. For those who have tried, they were just amazed as to how ketosis for weight loss worked amazingly for their bodies, unlike their previous weight loss regimens. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a known regular course that your body takes to keep it working without having enough carbohydrates for your cells. This process burns energy through fat while producing ketones. Ketosis refers to that metabolic process of the body wherein fat replaces carbohydrates as the fuel burned by our body to produce the energy that we need. Cutting down the quantity of carbohydrates or calories would reduce our reliance to carbohydrates as fuel for the body and thus, turns to fat or in a state of ketosis. When in the ketosis state, the liver utilizes fatty acids to form ketone molecules as an energy source. Ketones, or often termed as ketone bodies, breaks down fat as an energy source whenever our carbohydrate consumption is low. When our bodies are short of carbohydrates intake, our glucose levels also go down. Since sugar is the source of fuel for our bodies, glycogen levels also dwindle with both sugar and insulin levels lower. The body reacts by trying to search for an alternative fuel, which is likely fat. The number of ketones that our body has can be measured in: Our blood, using a glucose meter Our urine, using a urine strip Our breath, with a breath meter Among the three methods available, measuring ketone in the blood serves to be the best and most accurate one. The other two can be less accurate at times, but these somehow are the most affordable alternatives, especially for those who just star Continue reading >>

Expert’s Insight: Appetite Control And Caloric Intake On Low-carb Ketogenic Diets

Expert’s Insight: Appetite Control And Caloric Intake On Low-carb Ketogenic Diets

I am so pleased to introduce Dr. William Lagakos who has accepted my request to write an article for my blog! He is an expert in obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. In this post, Bill will present the findings from three recent controlled trials focused on the effects of low-carbohydrate vs low-calorie diets on appetite and weight loss. Bill runs his own blog and has authored his best-selling book, The poor, misunderstood calorie, which is one of the best resources on human energy metabolism. As most of you who follow the ketogenic diet know, "calorie is not a calorie" but calories are not insignificant: caloric intake definitely plays a role in weight loss. The regulation of appetite is a complicated thing, with many players and many, MANY moving parts. One of these parts is diet composition. That is, ‘what’ you eat impacts ‘how much food’ or ‘how many calories’ for which you’re hungry. One theory is that carbohydrates are a major driver; as restricting them is very effective at reducing appetite in obese populations. Exhibit A. In 2008, Westman and colleagues compared two diets of vastly different macronutrient compositions in a population of obese type 2 diabetic patients (Westman et al., 2008). Participants assigned to the first diet were instructed to limit their carbohydrate intake to fewer than 20 grams per day, but they could eat as much of whatever else they wanted (a ketogenic diet). Those assigned to the second diet were instructed to actively restrict food and fat intake by 500 kilocalories (calorie restricted diet, “CR”). Prior to starting the study, calorie intake for participants in both groups was ~2128 kilocalories per day. After 24 weeks, calorie intake by those assigned to the ketogenic diet spontaneously declined by almos Continue reading >>

Do Ketogenic Diets Really Suppress Appetite? A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Do Ketogenic Diets Really Suppress Appetite? A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Abstract Very-low-energy diets (VLEDs) and ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets (KLCDs) are two dietary strategies that have been associated with a suppression of appetite. However, the results of clinical trials investigating the effect of ketogenic diets on appetite are inconsistent. To evaluate quantitatively the effect of ketogenic diets on subjective appetite ratings, we conducted a systematic literature search and meta-analysis of studies that assessed appetite with visual analogue scales before (in energy balance) and during (while in ketosis) adherence to VLED or KLCD. Individuals were less hungry and exhibited greater fullness/satiety while adhering to VLED, and individuals adhering to KLCD were less hungry and had a reduced desire to eat. Although these absolute changes in appetite were small, they occurred within the context of energy restriction, which is known to increase appetite in obese people. Thus, the clinical benefit of a ketogenic diet is in preventing an increase in appetite, despite weight loss, although individuals may indeed feel slightly less hungry (or more full or satisfied). Ketosis appears to provide a plausible explanation for this suppression of appetite. Future studies should investigate the minimum level of ketosis required to achieve appetite suppression during ketogenic weight loss diets, as this could enable inclusion of a greater variety of healthy carbohydrate-containing foods into the diet. Continue reading >>

Do Ketogenic Diets Really Suppress Appetite?

Do Ketogenic Diets Really Suppress Appetite?

The Review The authors conducted a meta-analysis of studies that assessed appetite while individuals adhered to a ketogenic low-carbohydrate diet (KLCD) and very-low-energy diet (VLED). Results The study concludes that “individuals were less hungry and exhibited greater fullness/satiety while adhering to VLED, and individuals adhering to KLCD were less hungry and had a reduced desire to eat.” Although the changes in appetite were noted to be small, they occurred within the context of energy restriction,which is known to increase appetite in obese people. Conclusion In conclusion, there are studies that show the benefit of a KLCD in preventing an increase in appetite, despite weight loss. Citation Gibson AA, Seimon RV, Lee CM, Ayre J, Franklin J, Markovic TP, Caterson ID, Sainsbury A, Do ketogenic diets really suppress appetite? Obes. Rev. 2014; 15: 839-850 Continue reading >>

Timeline Of Changes In Appetite During Weight Loss With A Ketogenic Diet

Timeline Of Changes In Appetite During Weight Loss With A Ketogenic Diet

Diet-induced weight loss (WL) leads to increased hunger and reduced fullness feelings, increased ghrelin and reduced satiety peptides concentration (glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY)). Ketogenic diets seem to minimise or supress some of these responses. The aim of this study was to determine the timeline over which changes in appetite occur during progressive WL with a ketogenic very-low-energy diet (VLED). Thirty-one sedentary adults (18 men), with obesity (body mass index: 37±4.5 kg m−2) underwent 8 weeks (wks) of a VLED followed by 4 wks of weight maintenance. Body weight and composition, subjective feelings of appetite and appetite-related hormones (insulin, active ghrelin (AG), active GLP-1, total PYY and CCK) were measured in fasting and postprandially, at baseline, on day 3 of the diet, 5 and 10% WL, and at wks 9 and 13. Data are shown as mean±s.d. A significant increase in fasting hunger was observed by day 3 (2±1% WL), (P<0.01), 5% WL (12±8 days) (P<0.05) and wk 13 (17±2% WL) (P<0.05). Increased desire to eat was observed by day 3 (P<0.01) and 5% WL (P<0.05). Postprandial prospective food consumption was significantly reduced at wk 9 (16±2% WL) (P<0.01). Basal total PYY was significantly reduced at 10% WL (32±8 days) (P<0.05). Postprandial active GLP-1 was increased at 5% WL (P<0.01) and CCK reduced at 5 and 10% WL (P<0.01, for both) and wk 9 (P<0.001). Basal and postprandial AG were significantly increased at wk 13 (P<0.001, both). WL with a ketogenic VLED transiently increases the drive to eat up to 3 weeks (5% WL). After that, and while participants are ketotic, a 10–17% WL is not associated with increased appetite. However, hunger feelings and AG concentrations increase significantly from baseline, once r Continue reading >>

Does Hcg Suppress Appetite

Does Hcg Suppress Appetite

One of the many benefits of the HCG Diet, is the diet's ability to suppress your appetite while only consuming 500 calories. The burning question in everyone's mind is: Does the HCG hormone suppress your appetite? The short answer to that is: No, but the HCG Diet does. Here's why: The HCG's role in the HCG Diet is to help your body access your stored fat for energy, instead of your lean body mass (also known as precious muscle!). This is why we combine the hormone with what is called a very low calorie diet. This marriage between this 500 calorie diet and the HCG hormone is what makes up the HCG Diet. These two components are also the reason why the HCG Diet has been shown to help patients up to two pounds a day. Why Is The Hunger Gone? Here's the one piece of information other providers fail to mention to their patients (Not because they don't want to, but because they just don't know.). The reason the hunger is gone while on the HCG Diet is because of the very low calorie diet's ability to place your body in starvation mode (or ketosis). Once your body goes into starvation mode, your body will automatically shut off your ability to feel hunger. Once combined with the popper dosages of HCG, this very low calorie diet creates an unbelievable weight loss solution designed to help you get rid of excess fat without hunger pains. That's it, its as simple as 123! Now that you understand why losing weight on the HCG Diet is so easy, take advantage of this great opportunity and take full control of your life today! Order your HCG, and let's get started on this life changing journey together. 0 Comments Continue reading >>

Exactly How Ketosis Helps Weight Loss

Exactly How Ketosis Helps Weight Loss

Are you tired of going from one weight loss plan to another? Most of my patients and AWS clients who want to lose weight are not at their “first rodeo.” A weight loss plan that will work is a plan you can either stay on or segue to on and off through life. Have you wondered “does ketosis work for weight loss or is it just a fad?” Have you read the naysayer articles from dieticians who argue you will be deprived of nutrients and fiber? Do you almost believe the stories of successful and lasting weight loss but wonder exactly how ketosis helps weight loss? If you follow the right type of ketotic diet (eating healthfully; not a processed-food-laden Atkin’s diet), you’ll lose weight. Current data shows you are more likely to keep it off if you can “keto-adapt” during nutritional ketosis throughout life. A nutritional ketosis diet (standard ketogenic diet) will not only help you achieve an ideal weight (1), but it might even be somewhat anabolic; enhancing athletic performance. Let’s begin with food. What Do I Have to Eat? I’m laughing to myself as I write this, remembering the way my husband phrased it to me: “So, what are you taking away from me now?” This is, I’ve come to realize, how most people view any sort of diet plan. People think of a “diet” as a punitively restrictive way they must force themselves to eat so they can lose weight. It further implies they can go back to eating “the same old way” when they have lost the weight. What I’d like to propose to you about a “keto lifestyle” is that you can lose your weight easily by becoming what is called “keto-adapted.” This simply means you have re-trained your metabolism to use fat for fuel and to do it readily or on demand. You can then follow a healthy (meaning good for your Continue reading >>

No Appetite On Keto? Here’s What To Do…

No Appetite On Keto? Here’s What To Do…

One of the (for me) amazing benefits of eating a ketogenic diet is a dramatic decrease in appetite. For some people, this can be a little scary, though, certainly if you are someone that is used to feeling hungry or wanting to eat a lot of the time. For other people, it is a blessed relief to not be thinking about food all the time! I have noticed that there seems to be 3 distinct phases in the changes of your appetite when you start eating keto. Not everyone experiences this but it does seem to be pretty common. Phase 1 – Increase in hunger If you experience this it is likely to be in the first few days after transitioning to a ketogenic diet. It could be that you seem to be ravenous for carbs – which is simply your brain trying to get you to eat those carbs that it is used to fueling itself on. This is perfectly normal and just a stage that you need to buckle down and get through in order to keto-adapt. Alternatively (or additionally) you may feel like you suddenly can’t get enough of all the fatty goodness you have started eating. I definitely experienced this following a few days of carb cravings. All of a sudden it seemed like I just wanted to eat fatty protein and vegetables with tons of butter every minute of the day! My theory on this is that once you start feeding your body the good stuff, a light switches on in your brain and you kind of go into overdrive. It’s like your brain and body saying ” Oh my goodness yes! This is the stuff!! Give me more!”. If you experience this, just go for it. Don’t try to hold back and restrict your intake. Give yourself permission to feed and nourish yourself as much as you like. in all likelihood, this will only last for 2-3 days. Phase 2 – Dramatic Decrease in Appetite At around 2-3 weeks into your keto diet and Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets Suppress Appetite Despite Weight Loss, Review Finds

Ketogenic Diets Suppress Appetite Despite Weight Loss, Review Finds

Ketogenic diets suppress appetite despite weight loss, a review of evidence suggests. Researchers performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that evaluated appetite before and during adherence to very-low-energy diets and ketogenic low-carbohydrate diets. Researchers used visual analogue scales to assess appetite in energy balance (before dieting) and while ketosis (during dieting). They found that individuals on VLEDs had less hunger and greater fullness/satiety. Those on KLCDs had less hunger and reduced desire to eat. Whereas energy restriction typically increases appetite in obese people, individuals on ketogenic diets experienced small absolute reductions in appetite. Individuals on ketogenic diets may feel slightly less hungry, or more full or satisfied, despite weight loss, the press release added. "Ketosis appears to provide a plausible explanation for this suppression of appetite," the authors write. "Future studies should investigate the minimum level of ketosis required to achieve appetite suppression during ketogenic weight loss diets, as this could enable inclusion of a greater variety of healthy carbohydrate-containing foods into the diet." The research was published in the journal Obesity Reviews. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Ketone Drinks

Ketogenic Diet And Ketone Drinks

How many diets have you tried only to suffer the disappointment that your lost pounds slowly returned and brought a few extra friends with them? Unlike many fad diets that came and went with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet or keto diet has been practiced since the 1920s and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key underlying causes of weight gain, such as hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting food intake and “binging” on empty calorie foods due to increased hunger, which dieters struggle with. By contrast, keto diet normalizes hormones including insulin production, stabilizes blood sugar thus reducing hunger and eliminating the binging episodes. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvements. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning sugar to burning dietary fat. Weight loss on a ketogenic diet is associated with decreased appetite and altered gut hormone levels. During a ketogenic diet as well as during prolonged fasting periods, the body increases the production of the ketones such as d-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate. However, fasting is difficult and most of us find it unappealing and hard to do. Recently, researchers observed and increase in the blood ketone d-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) one hour following the ingestion of and exogen Continue reading >>

More in ketosis