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Why Does Ketosis Cause Insomnia

How Does Ketosis Cause Insomnia

How Does Ketosis Cause Insomnia

The first thing you might ask with this topic is what ketosis is. This term refers to our bodies using fat for energy. This means that your energy consumption is larger than your intake of carbohydrates in your food. Therefore, you have elevated levels of ketone bodies in the blood. If you are on a low carbohydrate diet you are likely to enter a state of ketosis. Then your body uses the carbohydrates from your body fat for energy. Epilepsy is sometimes treated with ketonic diet but low carbohydrate diets for weight loss are not usually recommended because they have negative effects on the health of the dieter. Diagnosis of Ketosis You can test if your body is in a state of ketosis from urine with the aid of Ketostix test strips. You also are likely to have a fruity breath if you are in a state of ketosis. Ketosis Insomnia Many people who have undergone ketosis because of dieting or other treatment have noted that there is an elevated risk of suffering from insomnia during ketosis. The insomnia is caused at least for some people by the low carbohydrate diet. What we eat has often an effect on how we sleep and, therefore, what we take away from our diet is also something that can affect sleep. Carbohydrates have a sleep inducing effect on some people. This is why taking away foods rich in carbohydrates can make it more difficult for you to sleep. If you have gotten used to eating sleep inducing food at bedtime it is easy to see why insomnia might be the result of dietary shifts. What to do with Ketosis Insomnia Ketosis is not a recommendable option for weight loss. If it causes insomnia too, it might be time to reconsider the diet. Talk it over with a qualified doctor in order to know if ketosis is a preferable option for you. Continue reading >>

Chasing Away Insomnia With A Bowl Of Oatmeal

Chasing Away Insomnia With A Bowl Of Oatmeal

Mike, the guy behind the desk at the gym, was yawning so much he could barely say good morning. “Late night?” I asked him. “No,” he yawned in reply. “I haven’t been sleeping well for days.” “How long have you been on the high-protein diet?” I asked, knowing nothing about what he had been eating, but guessing he had fallen prey to the fitness hype about the benefits of avoiding carbohydrates. I was right. Mike’s sleep problems started two weeks earlier because he had cut all starches and sugars from his diet. Now his sleep was like a yo-yo: asleep/awake/asleep/awake all night long. “I go to sleep at midnight, and I wake up at 2 or 2:30. I then fall back asleep, and I’m up again in another hour. My mind is racing, and I feel agitated and simply can’t relax,” he told me. If Mike had searched the Internet during those wakeful early morning hours, he would have read countless anecdotes from others describing similar sleepless nights. Whether the problem was failing to fall asleep easily, or get through the night without multiple awakenings, all the insomniacs had one thing in common: they were on high-protein, low or no-carbohydrate diets. This is not to say that there are not many other causes of sleep disturbances from taking too long to fall asleep, trouble staying asleep, or waking up too early. Anxiety, age, sleep apnea (which awakens the sleeper many times during the night), drug side effects, some degenerative diseases, and even shift work are but a few of the obstacles preventing this most natural and wanted behavior. But if someone stops sleeping normally at the same time as he or she stops eating carbohydrates, it does not take a sleep disorder expert to figure why…too little serotonin is the cause. Serotonin, the multi-functional brai Continue reading >>

How To: Avoid Insomnia On The Keto Diet

How To: Avoid Insomnia On The Keto Diet

Are you following a keto diet, and having trouble falling asleep? At night, do you feel tired, but wired at the same time? You are not alone. And it can be the push that causes you to throw away all of your hard work of achieving ketosis. But before you throw in the towel, let's see if there is something we can do to help you beat this keto diet insomnia. Here are a few tips that may help with your ketogenic diet insomnia. Give them a try! It is possible that your circadian rhythm may be disrupted. Circadian rhythm is a natural, internal system, that signals the release of either cortisol (upon waking), and melatonin (at night). It can be thrown off if you are a night shift worker, or you are indoors most of the time. One way to get your circadian rhythm back on track is to get some sunlight on your face and eyes, right when you wake up. This helps elevate serotonin and cortisol, to wake the body up. Spend as much time as you can outside, weather permitting. And dimming the lights at night time to help lower cortisol, and raise melatonin. It's also important to limit exposure to electronics after sunset. Electronic devices put out a light that signals the release of cortisol, much like the sun would. If you have to work at night, there are programs you can download that will change the lighting on your electronics to mimic the sun at sunset. I use f.lux for my laptop, and Night Mode for my phone. Take a magnesium supplement at night. It is a natural muscle relaxer, which may help relieve stress, or help with nighttime muscle cramps that are waking you up. Try taking a hot shower or bath right before bed. Add a couple cups of epsom salt, which contains magnesium, to help relax your muscles and add a couple drops of lavender oil to further your relaxation experience. Avoi Continue reading >>

Keto Talk (episode 28): Cardiomyopathy, Nusi Hall Study, Diet Soda, Insomnia, High Blood Pressure On Keto

Keto Talk (episode 28): Cardiomyopathy, Nusi Hall Study, Diet Soda, Insomnia, High Blood Pressure On Keto

THE KETOGENIC COOKBOOK NOW IN U.S. COSTCO STORES If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam deliver some thorough answers to the most pressing ketogenic questions in Episode 28! KEY QUOTE: “If you suddenly turn down the glucose drive (by lowering the carbohydrates consumed) but you leave the protein high enough to stimulate glucagon, you’re gonna stop fat loss but still lose body weight (as water).” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 28: – Does a ketogenic diet lead to cardiomyopathy? I came across this reference that suggested that a ketogenic diet had been associated with cardiomyopathy: I wonder if you and the Doc have any thoughts on this. Thank you for your great podcast. Barry in the UK – NuSI-funded Study Serves Up Disappointment for the Continue reading >>

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). I personally recommend a cyclic ketogenic diet for most of my clients where you go low-carb for 3 days and then have a slightly higher carbohydrate day, followed by 3 lower carb days. This cycles the body in and out of a state of ketosis and is beneficial for hormone balance while keeping inflammatory levels very low. The biggest challenge with this nutrition plan is to get into and maintain the state of fat adaption. Here are several advanced tips to get into and maintain ketosis. 1. Stay Hydrated: This is considered a no-brainer, but is not easy to follow. We often get so busy in our day-day lives that we forget to hydrate effectively. I recommend super hydrating your system by drinking 32 oz of filtered water within the first hour of waking and another 32-48 oz of water before noon. I have most of my clients do a water fast or eat light in the morning doing smoothies or keto coffee or tea. So hydration around these dishes should be well tolerated by the digestive system. In general, aiming to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water and closer to your full body weight in ounces of water daily will help you immensely. I weigh 160 lbs and easily drink 140-180 ounces of water each day. Sometimes more in the summer time. As you begin super Continue reading >>

Cure Your Insomnia – Ketosis Cure Insomnia

Cure Your Insomnia – Ketosis Cure Insomnia

Long-term insomnia is prevalent inside our society. It is one of the most frequent medical grievances and quite often why people seek specialist. Do you can wake up too soon in the morning or wake up up frequently, during the night, and then have a problem going again to sleep? Some people are usually more at risk then others. In case you are age sixty or older, a girl or struggling with a mental disorder already you may well be one of those people? Stress reeks havoc in our lives and sometimes seems like it is overpowering our life? Chronic sleeping disorders is a health threat however you can have a relaxing, restorative sleep again!. Although insomnia prevails among a notable proportion of people, children too suffer from sleep disorders. Insomnia in children is seen as indicators of wakefulness or uneasyness daily at night, becoming easily irritated or heaviness on rising from sleep, mood golf swings, lack of concentration, and unusual difficulty with knowing how. Causes of Insomnia in Children In children, what causes insomnia are generally more easy to work through that in grown ups. Learning the cause of your insomnia, there are solutions available to you well before your insomnia progresses to the point it has a negative influence on your life. The more you know as to what keeps you awake at nighttime the better chance of curing your insomnia and getting that rest you need. The effectiveness of curing your insomnia increases when the source for your sleeplessness is addressed. Addressing your insomnia is the harder personal work and it has the longest enduring effect on your sleeping and overall health. What Can Insomnia Do To Your Body Talk to your doctor for advice. Benzodiazepines are tranquilizers designed to reduce anxiety and promote calm, relaxation and s Continue reading >>

Getting Better Sleep — Cool, Dark, And Lots Of B6, Carbs, Calories, And Fat

Getting Better Sleep — Cool, Dark, And Lots Of B6, Carbs, Calories, And Fat

recently posted some sleeping tips. A lot of other great bloggers write about sleep too, like Mark Sisson, Robb Wolf, and Stephan Guyenet. I think sleep is really important, and I’ve had a lot of sleeping problems in the past, some of which I still occasionally struggle with, so I’m going to follow suit and post the things that have helped me most. Over a number of years, I’ve found that many things impact my ability to sleep, but from among these I can distill a handful of things I’ve found most critical: A cool, dark room. Light and phsyical activity upon waking. Lots of carbs, calories, and fat. Sufficient B6-rich foods. I need to have close to total darkness in the room when I fall asleep, and a sleep mask helps to prevent any residual light from reaching my eyes. A sleep mask does almost nothing if there’s lots of light in the room, as light on the skin seems to have a lesser effect than light on the eyes, but a nevertheless very meaningful impact. As my sleep has improved over the last two years, I’ve become less sensitive to light, perhaps because better sleep itself has begun normalizing my metabolic disturbances. But by “less sensitive” I mean that I can tolerate residual light sneaking in around the edges of curtains. I don’t mean I can tolerate no curtains or a light being on in the hallway, either of which would keep me up all night. I hope in the future my light tolerance continues to improve, as it makes no sense to me that humans are not designed to be able to tolerate at least the equivalent of moonlight and starlight. In addition to being dark, the room also has to be cool. I need a fan if the temperature gets much higher than 65F, and below 60F is ideal. I have also found that waking up at a regular time and immediately exposing mysel Continue reading >>

Sleep Nutrition

Sleep Nutrition

Carbohydrates and Sleep Growth hormone and insulin have antagonistic effects: Elevated growth hormone levels will reduce insulin’s effectiveness, and high insulin levels will suppress the secretion of growth hormone. Therefore, repeatedly eating carbohydrate-rich food immediately before going to sleep may impair growth hormone secretion during your deep-sleep phase. Additionally, your body is more resistant to the effects of insulin at night, meaning that you must produce more insulin to move a given amount of glucose to your body tissues. This may lead to even further suppression of growth hormone secretion. Growth hormone secretion is an important part of the process of SWS, therefore going to bed with elevated or rising insulin will reduce the effectiveness of SWS that night. It is important to go to bed with low blood sugar so that you can maximize your growth hormone secretion potential and Slow Wave Sleep quality. Originally, there was a number of papers showing insulin increasing deep sleep, for example here and here. The obvious statement, then, is that if carbohydrates increase insulin then naturally carbohydrates increase deep sleep. This is a prime example of an ‘affirming the consequent propositional fallacy’. While healthy metabolism will raise insulin in response to an increase in carbohydrates, a healthy metabolism will not raise carbohydrates in response to an increase in insulin (glucagon does that). It therefore stands that carbohydrates do not necessarily increase deep sleep, and in fact insulin will lower blood-glucose causing hypoglycaemia when increased alone… A simple increase in ketosis, or food restriction replicates this increase in SWS without decreasing Growth Hormone secretion. In fact both low carb, ketosis and food restriction incr Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet's Effect On Cortisol Metabolism

The Ketogenic Diet's Effect On Cortisol Metabolism

(Related post: Red Light, Green Light: responses to cortisol levels in keto vs. longevity research) One of the myths surrounding ketogenic diets comes from misunderstanding the role of cortisol — the "stress hormone". In a previous post, we addressed one of the arguments behind this myth: the idea that to activate gluconeogenesis (to make glucose out of protein), extra cortisol must be recruited. That is just factually incorrect, as we showed in the post. The other argument, which we address here, is more complex. Like the previous cortisol myth, it involves a faulty chain of reasoning. Here are the steps: Ketogenic diets may raise certain measures of cortisol. Chronically elevated cortisol is correlated with metabolic sydrome, and therefore higher cortisol measures may indicate the onset of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, ketogenic diets could cause metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a terrible and prevalent problem today. It is that cluster of symptoms most strongly identified with diabetes — excess abdominal fat, high blood sugar, and a particular cholesterol profile — but also correlated with other life-threatening conditions such as heart disease and cancer. In this post, we're going to explain some of the specifics of cortisol metabolism. We'll show how this argument is vague, and how clarifying it leads to the opposite conclusion. The confusion may all stem from misunderstanding one important fact: different measures of cortisol are not equivalent. First, though, there is an important reason why the argument doesn't make sense. We already know that a ketogenic diet effectively treats metabolic syndrome. As we will describe below, it turns out that certain cortisol patterns are strongly linked to metabolic syndrome, and might even be a cause of metabol Continue reading >>

"keto-flu" And Sufficient Intake Of Electrolytes

People often ask me about potassium deficiency (or any other mineral deficiency) on a low-carb, ketogenic diet. I decided to summarise which minerals you should be aware of and what the adequate intake is... To pin or bookmark an easy to follow guide to keto-flu remedies, have a look at this post! What is "Keto-Flu"? Electrolytes (sodium, magnesium and potassium) are often underestimated on low-carb diets. As low-carb expert and scientific researcher Dr. Volek suggests, mineral and electrolyte management is the key to avoiding side effects typically associated with low carb dieting. When entering the induction phase of a Ketogenic Diet (50 grams or less of total carbs - about 20-30 grams of net carbs), most people experience "keto-flu”. This often scares them off and they start to think that low-carb is not right for their body. The "flu" is nothing else than a result of starving your body of carbohydrates. Stay strong! You can easily counteract these effects by replenishing electrolytes. Make sure you include foods rich in electrolytes in your everyday diet and take food supplements (if needed). Firstly, I would like to share my own experience with electrolyte deficiency. I have been really tired recently. It was actually so bad that I couldn't open my eyes and could barely get up even after 7-9 hours of sleep. Also, my energy levels at gym were very low. I woke up in the middle of the night and experienced heart palpitations (weird feeling that could be described as "heart beating too fast"). I knew what was going on: I was magnesium / potassium deficient. I have been on a low-carb diet for more than a year and always made sure I include food rich in these minerals in my diet. The truth is, I have been so busy recently that I didn't pay enough attention to my diet. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet & Sleep Problems: How Are Carbohydrates And Ketosis Associated With Disturbed Sleep?

Ketogenic Diet & Sleep Problems: How Are Carbohydrates And Ketosis Associated With Disturbed Sleep?

A diet which is rich in fat and low in proteins and carbohydrates is called a ketogenic diet. Going on a ketogenic diet is one of the ways people revert to in order to achieve quick weight loss. While ketogenic diet can have adverse consequences to a person's well being, it can also lead to sleep deprivation or insomnia over a period of time. Consumption of carbohydrates is vital for the body that not only keeps the energy equilibrium maintained, but also plays a role in your quality of sleep. If you are planning to adopt ketogenic diet then beware my friend of the complications it can have in the long run over your sleep cycle! Maintaining a good body is essential, but it should not compromise with your sleep which is vital for your health and well being. Herein, we break down some valuable information on how ketogenic diet can be associated with sleep disturbances and how it can be managed. A diet which is rich in fat and low in proteins and carbohydrates is called a ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are called storehouse of energy as their breakdown results in enormous energy released by the body needed for performing its functions. In absence of these dietary carbs, the glycogen and fat is broken down thereby causing enormous loss of weight. It is during fat breakdown that causes release of ketones in blood also known as ketosis. The weight loss of a person of a ketogenic diet can be sudden and high in intensity often causing euphoric feeling, but leading to sleep problems over a period of time. Known to cause a soothing effect on the body, carbohydrates are often referred to as "comfort foods" in dietary terms. These carbs are responsible for maintaining steady glucose supply, maintaining energy equilibrium and at the same time keeping the protein balance in the brain. Continue reading >>

Eggs And Insomnia

Eggs And Insomnia

It isn’t well known that eggs (large amounts) can cause insomnia nor that caffeine — in special cases — can reduce insomnia. But a reader named BM recently made those discoveries: Back around July 2012, I was trying to improve my diet but I didn’t want to give up my vegetarianism, so I started to eat a LOT of eggs, usually in the range of 10 to 14 per day. Not long after, I started having awful insomnia. I could lie awake all night just unable to fall asleep. There were suddenly just too many thoughts buzzing through my head keeping me up. I assumed that it was a result of ketosis disturbing sleep. I tried reintroducing carbs, but when that didn’t work I gave up on dietary modifications. I started cycling through OTC sleep aids, but I developed tolerance to anticholinergics very quickly. By October 2013, I was going crazy. I couldn’t sleep well. It was making me depressed and seriously impairing my academic performance. I was exhausted constantly, but then I noticed something. I slept better when I consumed a lot of caffeine in the morning. I noticed there was a clear dose dependent relationship between how much caffeine I consumed and how well I slept. I had a hunch that the caffeine was depleting my acetylcholine levels, serving a similar function as OTC anticholinergics like diphenhydramine and kava. I wondered what would happen if I sharply reduced my intake of acetylcholine precursors. A lot of people advertise eggs as “choline packed”, so I cut back to less than 3 per day. Suddenly, I was sleeping much better. Now, it could be something else in the eggs (I’m not really attached to my choline hypothesis), but either way I feel confident blaming them for my sleep troubles. My insomnia returns whenever I start eating them again. I asked him why he h Continue reading >>

Bipolar Disorder And Diet Part Ii: Low Carbohydrate Diets

Bipolar Disorder And Diet Part Ii: Low Carbohydrate Diets

Can food stabilize mood? Is there a diet out there that could prevent mania, mood swings, deep depressions, and uncomfortably anxious and agitated states? Sound far-fetched? Maybe not. Dietary changes can have very powerful effects on brain chemistry. Low carbohydrate diets, in particular, are fascinating. Ketogenic Diets and Epilepsy When most people think of low-carbohydrate diets, they think of weight loss. But did you know that neurologists have been successfully treating severe cases of epilepsy with low-carbohydrate (“ketogenic”) diets for nearly 100 years? Ketogenic diets are specially designed low-carbohydrate diets that typically contain between 60-80% fat, with the remainder consisting of roughly equal amounts of protein and carbohydrate. In most cases, patients in clinical studies were hospitalized children whose seizures could not be controlled with anticonvulsant medications. Yet, with diet alone : Nearly all patients achieve more than a 50% reduction in seizures with 33% experiencing a 90% reduction in seizures and 10 to 15% achieving complete remission from seizures What more powerful evidence could there be for the role of diet in brain chemistry? Not only is this phenomenon remarkable in its own right, but it also has potentially powerful implications for the treatment of a wide variety of neurological disorders. Ketogenic Diets Have Magical Healing Properties All of the following conditions have been shown in animal models or in human studies to improve on a ketogenic diet: Autism Traumatic Brain Injury Alzheimer’s Disease Parkinson’s Disease Brain Cancer Diabetes Prostate Cancer Obesity Chronic Pain/Inflammation Multiple Sclerosis Insomnia/Circadian Rhythm disorders How Do Ketogenic Diets Work? Nobody knows. It is a subject of intense research Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

What Could Cause Extreme Insomnia On A Low Carb Diet?

What Could Cause Extreme Insomnia On A Low Carb Diet?

it happens each time i attempt a ketogenic diet. i eat high-quality foods and that doesn't seem to matter. i also experience tingling arms and legs when trying to sleep on a low carb diet. anyone know what the problem could be? Continue reading >>

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