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Why Does Ketoacidosis Cause Vomiting

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In this health for you video we will explain What Causes Nausea and Vomiting During Pregnancy? Am i Pregnant Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy Your nausea is caused by high levels of pregnancy hormones flooding your body. It’s very common. Up to nine out of 10 pregnant women experience nausea or vomiting. Don't forget to Subscribe our Channel on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZfb... For For Videos Follow Us on Twitter: What Causes Nausea and Vomiting During Pregnancy? https://youtu.be/eit5H8HJy2Q How To Prevent Nausea in Pregnancy? https://youtu.be/yxrlp4005YE Therapies For Morning Sickness Which Really Works https://youtu.be/KWqiJg1aIWM Herbal Remedies Pregnancy Sickness https://youtu.be/HiwYoTm7vEo Complete Solution of Pregnancy Morning Sickness https://youtu.be/ARDSvkPBtNI Now that you’re pregnant, your body is producing the hormone human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) in large quantities. This hormone makes sure that your baby gets what he needs from your body in the early weeks. Once the placenta takes over nourishing your baby, hCG levels drop and your nausea should ease. Other hormones can contribute to nausea and sickness in pregnancy, such as oestrogen and possibly stress hormones, such as cortisol. Being low in certain nutrients, including vitamin B6, is another cause suggested by experts. Being sick is miserable, but as long as you are drinking plenty and not losing weight, your health and the wellbeing of your baby shouldn’t be affected. Hopefully, your morning sickness will subside between about 14 weeks and 16 weeks. For some women, however, it can continue for a little longer. For an unfortunate few, it lasts throughout pregnancy. If you have very severe sickness and struggle to keep down even water, see your midwife as soon as you can. You may have a serious form of pregnancy sickness called Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG). HG can leave you dehydrated and under-nourished, and you may need treatment in hospital.

Nausea And Vomiting

Tweet Most, if not all of us will be familiar with the feeling of nausea, which is basically the feeling of needing to be sick, felt in the stomach area. Both nausea and vomiting can be a sign of a number of underlying health conditions, including diabetes. When there is an issue that can affect the stomach or gastric system of their body, people can feel sick. Even if it is a fairly tenuous connection, such as angina affecting blood flow, the sufferer may still feel queasy. Causes of nausea Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can cause nausea or vomiting in several ways. Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia As the blood glucose levels rise and fall, the body's metabolism can get interrupted and confused which can lead to a mixed feeling of nausea. Low blood pressure (Hypotension) Low blood pressure often leads to dizzy spells which, for some people, can induce a feeling of nausea as the world appears to spin around them. Certain medications The side effect of a lot of drugs is a feeling of nausea, and even vomiting. Metformin, the most widely used diabetes drug, is known to have nauseating side effects. Gastroparesis Due to neuropathy, the body may not be able to move food from the Continue reading >>

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  1. AMZMD

    The human body is in a constant process of maintaining equilibrium. The byproducts of burning fat for energy (ketones) are deposited in the blood for excretion. As the ketones build up in your system, the pH of your blood drops and you become acidotic. As stated above, your body is trying to maintain equilibrium, so it will do certain things to eliminate as much acid from your system as possible, as quickly as possible. One way is to vomit, which dumps huge amounts of H+ instantly. Other reactions are increased respirations to eliminate CO2, as well as dumping the ketones and H+ out through your urine.
    As a side note, the dumping of H+ through urine causes the retention of potassium and you become hyperkalemic (aka "too-much-potassium-emia"). This inhibits myocardial function and can put you into cardiac arrest. This is why extreme no-carb diets are a very bad thing!
    Hope that helps!

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Understanding The Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) must be considered while forming a differential diagnosis when assessing and managing a patient with an altered mental status. This is especially true if the patient has a history of diabetes mellitus (DM). However, be aware that the onset of DKA or HHNS may be the first sign of DM in a patient with no known history. Thus, it is imperative to obtain a blood glucose reading on any patient with an altered mental status, especially if the patient appears to be dehydrated, regardless of a positive or negative history of DM. In addition to the blood glucose reading, the history — particularly onset — and physical assessment findings will contribute to the formulation of a differential diagnosis and the appropriate emergency management of the patient. Pathophysiology of DKA The patient experiencing DKA presents significantly different from one who is hypoglycemic. This is due to the variation in the pathology of the condition. Like hypoglycemia, by understanding the basic pathophysiology of DKA, there is no need to memorize signs and symptoms in order to recognize and differentiate bet Continue reading >>

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  1. AMZMD

    The human body is in a constant process of maintaining equilibrium. The byproducts of burning fat for energy (ketones) are deposited in the blood for excretion. As the ketones build up in your system, the pH of your blood drops and you become acidotic. As stated above, your body is trying to maintain equilibrium, so it will do certain things to eliminate as much acid from your system as possible, as quickly as possible. One way is to vomit, which dumps huge amounts of H+ instantly. Other reactions are increased respirations to eliminate CO2, as well as dumping the ketones and H+ out through your urine.
    As a side note, the dumping of H+ through urine causes the retention of potassium and you become hyperkalemic (aka "too-much-potassium-emia"). This inhibits myocardial function and can put you into cardiac arrest. This is why extreme no-carb diets are a very bad thing!
    Hope that helps!

  2. -> Continue reading
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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Ketoacidosis

GENERAL ketoacidosis is a high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to an excessive blood concentration of ketone bodies (keto-anions). ketone bodies (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released into the blood from the liver when hepatic lipid metabolism has changed to a state of increased ketogenesis. a relative or absolute insulin deficiency is present in all cases. CAUSES The three major types of ketosis are: (i) Starvation ketosis (ii) Alcoholic ketoacidosis (iii) Diabetic ketoacidosis STARVATION KETOSIS when hepatic glycogen stores are exhausted (eg after 12-24 hours of total fasting), the liver produces ketones to provide an energy substrate for peripheral tissues. ketoacidosis can appear after an overnight fast but it typically requires 3 to 14 days of starvation to reach maximal severity. typical keto-anion levels are only 1 to 2 mmol/l and this will usually not alter the anion gap. the acidosis even with quite prolonged fasting is only ever of mild to moderate severity with keto-anion levels up to a maximum of 3 to 5 mmol/l and plasma pH down to 7.3. ketone bodies also stimulate some insulin release from the islets. patients are usually not diabetic. ALCOHOLIC KE Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. AMZMD

    The human body is in a constant process of maintaining equilibrium. The byproducts of burning fat for energy (ketones) are deposited in the blood for excretion. As the ketones build up in your system, the pH of your blood drops and you become acidotic. As stated above, your body is trying to maintain equilibrium, so it will do certain things to eliminate as much acid from your system as possible, as quickly as possible. One way is to vomit, which dumps huge amounts of H+ instantly. Other reactions are increased respirations to eliminate CO2, as well as dumping the ketones and H+ out through your urine.
    As a side note, the dumping of H+ through urine causes the retention of potassium and you become hyperkalemic (aka "too-much-potassium-emia"). This inhibits myocardial function and can put you into cardiac arrest. This is why extreme no-carb diets are a very bad thing!
    Hope that helps!

  2. -> Continue reading
read more

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