diabetestalk.net

Why Does Ketoacidosis Cause Rapid Breathing

Why Does Anaemia Cause Shortness Of Breath Or Rapid Breathing?

Why Does Anaemia Cause Shortness Of Breath Or Rapid Breathing?

Anemia causes shortness of breath and/or rapid breathing because you either have a deficit of red blood cells or an impairment of the ability of the red blood cells to carry oxygen. The shortness of breath comes from feeling like you can't get enough oxygen into your system, which is due to the inability to bind oxygen to the red blood cell or because you lack enough normal red blood cells to be able to transport oxygen. Rapid breathing is your body's attempt to bring more oxygen in, and it can also be a response to having a carbon dioxide level that is too high or acidity in the blood. When there is tissue hypoxia, that tissue will revert to anaerobic respiration, which results in lactic acid production. As that enters the blood stream, the blood stream becomes more and more acidic. To correct this, the body will hyperventilate in an effort to deplete carbon dioxide (an acid) levels in order to increase the pH of the blood. Continue reading >>

Breathing Difficulties In Cats

Breathing Difficulties In Cats

Dyspnea, Tachypnea and Panting in Cats The respiratory system has many parts, including the nose, throat (pharynx and larynx), windpipe, and lungs. Air comes in through the nose and is then carried down into the lungs, through a process referred to as inspiration. In the lungs, the oxygen is transferred to the red blood cells. The red blood cells then carry the oxygen to other organs in the body. This is all part of the physical process of a healthy body. While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea). Breathing difficulties can affect cats of any breed or age, and the problem can quickly become life threatening. If your cat is having problems with breathing it should be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. Symptoms and Types Difficulty Breathing (dyspnea) The belly and chest move when breathing Nostrils may flare open when breathing Breathing with an open mouth Breathing with the elbows sticking out from the body Neck and head are held low and out in front of the body (extended) Problem may occur when breathing in (inspiratory dyspnea) Problem may occur when breathing out (expiratory dyspnea) Noisy breathing (stridor) Fast breathing (tachypnea) Rate of breathing is faster than normal Mouth is usually closed Panting F Continue reading >>

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Tweet The respiratory system is the system of organs that allow the body to take in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide, this process is known as gaseous exchange. We generally breathe between 12 and 20 times a minute. There are a number of complications of diabetes that can negatively affect our breathing. Parts of the respiratory system The following parts of the body make up the respiratory system: Mouth and nose Trachea (windpipe) Lungs Diaphragm How the respiratory system works Breathing is usually initiated by contraction of the diaphragm, a muscle which separates the chest cavity from the abdomen. As the diaphragm contracts, more space is made available in the chest cavity and this has the effect of creating suction as the lungs expand to fill the space. The lungs draw in air through the nose and/or mouth which then travels down the trachea (windpipe) before reaching the lungs. Within the lungs are tiny air sacs called alveoli which allow oxygen from the air we breathe to be absorbed into the many tiny blood vessels contained with the alveoli. As this happens, the alveoli take in carbon dioxide from the blood vessels and this completes gaseous exchange. With gaseous exchange complete, the diaphragm relaxes and the carbon dioxide rich air in the lungs is expelled via the trachea out of the mouth and/or nose. The lungs As noted above, it is within the lungs that the gaseous exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place. The lungs are filled with a branched structure of airways called bronchi and smaller airways called bronchioles. Located at the end of the bronchioles are the alveoli in which the exchange of gases takes place. The average capacity of human lungs is between 4 and 6 litres of air. The capacity of lungs may be reduced if the lungs become diseased or d Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Rapid Breathing?

Why Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Rapid Breathing?

Diabetes affects 18% of people over the age of 65, and approximately 625,000 new cases of diabetes are diagnosed annually in the general population. Conditions or situations known to exacerbate glucose/insulin imbalance include (1) previously undiagnosed or newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes; (2) food intake in excess of available insulin; (3) adolescence and puberty; (4) exercise in uncontrolled diabetes; and (5) stress associated with illness, infection, trauma, or emotional distress. Type 1 diabetes can be complicated by instability and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is a life-threatening emergency caused by a relative or absolute deficiency of insulin. CARE SETTING Although DKA may be encountered in any setting and mild DKA may be managed at the community level, severe metabolic imbalance requires inpatient acute care on a medical unit. Amputation Fluid and electrolyte imbalances Metabolic acidosis (primary base bicarbonate deficit) Psychosocial aspects of care Patient Assessment Database Data depend on the severity and duration of metabolic imbalance, length/stage of diabetic process, and effects on other organ function. ACTIVITY/REST May report: Sleep/rest disturbances Weakness, fatigue, difficulty walking/moving Muscle cramps, decreased Continue reading >>

What Causes Heavy Breathing?

What Causes Heavy Breathing?

The respiratory system consists of the lungs, airways and muscles that assist in breathing. This system of organs and tissues controls how an individual inhales oxygen and exhales carbon dioxide. When heavy breathing occurs, it usually manifests from overexertion or as a symptom of a health problem such as asthma. Those who experience heavy breathing may have heaviness in the chest and bouts of breathlessness. A healthcare provider may assist in diagnosing and treating the cause of heavy breathing. Video of the Day Anxiety commonly involves feelings of apprehension and nervousness. However, for some people, anxiety can become disabling and cause excessive fear. The National Institute of Mental Health notes that anxiety disorders affect approximately 40 million Americans aged 18 years and older in a given year. Those with anxiety disorders may experience rapid breathing, sweating, trembling, fatigue and increased heart rate. Hyperventilation is a common sign of severe anxiety that causes a decreased amount of oxygen in the blood and rapid or deep breathing. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs. The condition involves swelling and inflammation of the airways that carry air in and out of the lungs. Those with asthma experience breathing problems because of narrowed airways that cause the lungs to receive less air. Approximately 20 million people in the U.S. have asthma, and nearly 6 million of these people are children, according to the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. During an asthma flare-up, symptoms may range from minor to severe. The most common symptoms of asthma include wheezing and heavy breathing, shortness of breath, chest tightness and coughing. Emphysema is a chronic and progressive disorder of the lungs. The disorder is a type of chro Continue reading >>

Shortness Of Breath (dyspnea): Symptoms & Signs

Shortness Of Breath (dyspnea): Symptoms & Signs

Shortness of breath has many causes affecting either the breathing passages and lungs or the heart or blood vessels. An average 150-pound (70 kilogram) adult will breathe at an average rate of 14 breaths per minute at rest. Excessively rapid breathing is referred to as hyperventilation. Shortness of breath is also referred to as dyspnea. Doctors will further classify dyspnea as either occurring at rest or being associated with activity, exertion, or exercise. They will also want to know if the dyspnea occurs gradually or all of a sudden. Each of these symptoms help to detect the precise cause of the shortness of breath. Shortness of breath can be associated with symptoms of chest pain, pain with inspiration (pleurisy), anxiousness, fatigue, dizziness, fainting, cough, wheezing, bloody sputum, neck pain, and chest injury. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Pictures, Images, Illustrations & Quizzes Causes of Shortness of Breath Chest Wall & Chest Muscle Diseases Numerous diseases of muscles and the nervous system can lead to shortness of breath by weakening the body's capacity for opening the lungs up for respiration. Examples of muscle diseases include muscular dystrophy. Nervous system diseases, such as paralysis, can lead to shortness of breath. Heart Diseases Many conditions that affect the heart and its capacity to move blood through the lungs can lead to shortness of breath. These conditions include valve diseases of the heart and others. Lung Tissue Diseases There are a vast number of lung tissue diseases ranging from common and temporary, to uncommon and chronic. These include infections (pneumonia, acute bronchitis from bacteria, viruses, etc.), cancers that have s Continue reading >>

Anxiety Always Comes With Shallow Breathing

Anxiety Always Comes With Shallow Breathing

There are a lot of anxiety symptoms that cause a considerable amount of fear, and may trigger severe attacks. These include: Chest Pains Lightheadedness Weakness and Tingling Feeling Feint Rapid Heartbeat These symptoms can be very scary - so scary, in fact, that some people are hospitalized as they worry they're having a heart attack. What most people don't realize, however, is that all of these symptoms are caused by one common anxiety problem: shallow breathing. Shallow Breathing = Anxiety? If you've never spoken with a doctor before, it's always a good to check your heart and lungs. But you'll find that shallow breathing is in almost all cases caused by anxiety. It's one of the most common - and most problematic - anxiety issues. Take my anxiety test to learn more about how shallow breathing affects your anxiety. Start the test here. Shallow Breathing Affects All Those With Anxiety Shallow breathing is defined as small, short breaths. When caused by anxiety, they are almost never dangerous and rarely indicate an underlying health problem (although obesity may increase the risk of shallow breathing). However, this little anxiety symptom can cause a cascade of reactions that have wreaked havoc on millions of people with anxiety. It's most commonly associated with panic attacks, but it may be present in every type of anxiety disorder. If you haven't yet, take my anxiety test to learn more about what you might be suffering from. The Problem Isn't Too Little Air - It's Too Much When people talk about shallow breathing, their primary concern is whether they're getting enough oxygen. Short, rapid breaths make people feel as though they need to get deeper breaths, and so they try to yawn or breathe in deeply in order to compensate. Unfortunately, this makes everything worse Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. It's important to seek medical advice quickly if you think that you or your child is experiencing the condition. Causes of diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that can occur if the body starts to run out of insulin. It's common in people with type 1 diabetes and can very occasionally affect those with type 2 diabetes. It sometimes develops in people who were previously unaware they had diabetes. Children and young adults are most at risk. Insulin enables the body to use blood sugar (glucose). If there is a lack of insulin, or if it can't be used properly, the body will break down fat instead. The breakdown of fat releases harmful, acidic substances called ketones.The lack of insulin in your body leads to high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). The combination of high ketone and blood sugar levels can cause a number of symptoms that can be very serious if the levels aren't corrected quickly. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis The initial symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis can develop quite suddenly. They will continue to get worse if not treated. Early symptoms In the early stages, the main signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine severe thirst weight loss feeling sick tiredness You may also develop other symptoms of dehydration, such as a dry mouth. If you have your own device or kit to measure your blood sugar and/or ketone levels, you may notice that the levels of both of these are higher than normal. Advanced symptoms Left untreated, more advanced symptoms can develop, including: rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) rapid breathing, where you breathe in more oxygen than your body actua Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis, also called DKA, is a life-threatening complication occurring with undiagnosed and/or untreated Type 1 diabetes in adults and children. DKA symptoms often remain undiagnosed because they can look like (mimic) influenza, a stomach bug, strep infections, and other common illnesses and conditions. However, someone may actually have a common illness and DKA at the same time, causing the common illness symptoms to hide (mask) the underlying DKA symptoms. Either way, untreated Type 1 diabetes and DKA are 100% fatal. ​IMPORTANT: Diabetic ketoacidosis is LIFE-THREATENING and can progress quickly–often within 24 hours! If you or a loved one have any of the following symptoms with VOMITING AND LETHARGY COMBINED WITH LABORED BREATHING, do not consume sugar and seek emergency medical care immediately. Insist medical personnel Test One Drop of blood or urine for glucose (sugar) levels. DKA can be fatal! ​ SYMPTOMS OF DKA: excessive thirst frequent urination or bedwetting increased appetite or sugar cravings abdominal pain irritability, grouchiness, or mood changes headaches and/or vision changes itchy skin/genitals (yeast or thrush) sudden weight loss flushed, hot, dry skin nausea and vomiting* fruity/acetone scented breath* lethargy, drowsiness, or fatigue* labored, rapid, and/or deep breathing* confusion, stupor, or unconsciousness* *A combination of any of these symptoms can be life-threatening. Seek EMERGENCY CARE. When new onset Type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed and untreated the shortage of insulin causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to climb above the normal range. Without adequate insulin to regulate levels of glucose in the blood, high levels of acids called ketones build up in the body causing diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketones are toxic and if l Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing

Kussmaul Breathing

What is Kussmaul Breathing? Kussmaul Breathing is the term given to a condition in which the patient builds up an extremely deep and difficult breathing pattern. This is seen mostly in individuals who are diabetic and have severe forms of metabolic acidosis, particularly diabetic ketoacidosis with kidney dysfunction. Kussmaul Breathing can likewise be clarified as a type of hyperventilation which is a condition in which an individual breathes in such a deep pattern, to the point that the level of carbon dioxide reduces in the blood, which is seen for the most part in metabolic acidosis where the breathing turns out to be more quick and shallow and as the condition exacerbates the breathing gets to be distinctly shallow and profound and it looks as though the individual is virtually gasping for breath. This kind of breathing in which the individual is essentially gasping for air is what is named as Kussmaul Breathing. Kussmaul’s Respiration There are diverse medical conditions that can influence the basic/acidic balance in your body, which means your body can turn out to be more basic or acidic. At the point when a man is acidotic, that is to say they are experiencing a pathological process (known as acidosis) that prompts to acidemia, an abnormal low pH of the blood, they may experience Kussmaul’s respiration. Kussmaul’s respiration, as German doctor Adolph Kussmaul himself portrayed, is in fact profound, slow, and labored breathing, which we now know is because of serious acidemia coming from metabolic acidosis. Nonetheless, these days, it is now and again used to portray shallow and rapid breathing examples in instances of less severe acidemia too. Reasons for this breathing pattern happening All things considered, what do you take in? Oxygen, isn’t that so? W Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic acidosis is a life-threatening condition that can occur in people with type 1 diabetes. Less commonly, it can also occur with type 2 diabetes. Term watch Ketones: breakdown products from the use of fat stores for energy. Ketoacidosis: another name for diabetic acidosis. It happens when a lack of insulin leads to: Diabetic acidosis requires immediate hospitalisation for urgent treatment with fluids and intravenous insulin. It can usually be avoided through proper treatment of Type 1 diabetes. However, ketoacidosis can also occur with well-controlled diabetes if you get a severe infection or other serious illness, such as a heart attack or stroke, which can cause vomiting and resistance to the normal dose of injected insulin. What causes diabetic acidosis? The condition is caused by a lack of insulin, most commonly when doses are missed. While insulin's main function is to lower the blood sugar level, it also reduces the burning of body fat. If the insulin level drops significantly, the body will start burning fat uncontrollably while blood sugar levels rise. Glucose will then begin to show up in your urine, along with ketone bodies from fat breakdown that turn the body acidic. The body attempts to reduce the level of acid by increasing the rate and depth of breathing. This blows off carbon dioxide in the breath, which tends to correct the acidosis temporarily (known as acidotic breathing). At the same time, the high secretion of glucose into the urine causes large quantities of water and salts to be lost, putting the body at serious risk of dehydration. Eventually, over-breathing becomes inadequate to control the acidosis. What are the symptoms? Since diabetic acidosis is most often linked with high blood sugar levels, symptoms are the same as those for diabetes Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Most children with bronchiolitis have mild symptoms and recover within two to three weeks, but it's important to look out for signs of more serious problems , such as breathing difficulties. Early symptoms of bronchiolitis tend to appear within a few days of becoming infected. They're usually similar to those of a common cold, such as a blocked or runny nose, a cough and a slightly high temperature (fever). The symptoms usually get worse during the next few days, before gradually improving. During this time, your child may develop some of the following symptoms: a rasping and persistent dry cough rapid or noisy breathing (wheezing) brief pauses in their breathing feeding less and having fewer wet nappies vomiting after feeding being irritable Most cases of bronchiolitis aren't serious, but the symptoms can be very worrying. Symptoms are usually at their worst between day three and day five. The cough usually gets better within three weeks. When to seek medical advice If your child only has mild cold-like symptoms and is recovering well, there's usually no need to seek medical advice. You can usually care for your child at home. Contact your GP if you're worried about your child, or if they develop any of the following symptoms: struggling to breathe poor feeding (your child has taken less than half their usual amount during the last two or three feeds) they've had no wet nappy for 12 hours or more a breathing rate of 50-60 breaths per minute a high temperature of 38C (100.4F) or above they seem very tired or irritable It's particularly important to seek medical advice if your baby is under 12 weeks old, or they have an underlying health condition, such as a congenital (present from birth) heart or lung condition. When to call 999 While it's unusual for children to need Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: Acute Complications

Diabetes Update: Acute Complications

"Diabetes update: Acute complications" CE credit is no longer available for this article. Originally posted April 2001 MARJORIE CYPRESS, MS, C-ANP, CDE MARJORIE CYPRESS is a nurse practitioner and certified diabetes educator for Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, N.M. Series Editor: Carolyn Robertson, RN, MSN, CDE KEY WORDS: acute complications, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, ketosis Critically high or low blood sugar in a patient with diabetes is a medical emergency. You'll need to be able to quickly identify and know how to manage the acute complications of diabetes to help a patient avoid a tragic outcome. Here's how. Jump to: Choose article section... Emergency treatment of acute complications of diabetes demands quick recognition of the problem and immediate intervention. High blood sugar can progress to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in Type 1 diabetics, and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) in those with Type 2. But every diabetic patient taking a hypoglycemic agent is at risk for hypoglycemia, the most common—and most feared—complication. Here we'll review the pathophysiology behind DKA, HHS, and hypoglycemia; provide assessments that help distinguish one complication from another; and discuss emergency treatments and nursing strategies that can prevent a potentially fatal outcome. Too much sugar, too little insulin DKA, often referred to as diabetic coma, occurs when there's a profound lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, the body can't use glucose for fuel. Cells starve as sugar accumulates. The blood becomes thick with sugar, which promotes osmotic diuresis. As the body loses water, the excess sugar spills into the urine, taking important electrolytes with it. Patients become thirsty and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the hallmark of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. DKA is an emergency condition caused by a disturbance in your body’s metabolism. Extremely high blood glucose levels, along with a severe lack of insulin, result in the breakdown of body fat for energy and an accumulation of ketones in the blood and urine. Statistics on Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in between 16%-80% of children presenting with newly diagnosed diabetes. It remains the most common cause of death for young type 1 diabetes sufferers. Before the discovery of insulin, mortality rates were up to 100%. Today, the mortality has fallen to around 2% due to early identification and treatment. Death is usually caused by cerebral oedema (swelling of the brain). DKA is most common in type 1 diabetes sufferers but may also occur in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the latter group usually has at least some functioning insulin so suffer from another disorder called hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma (HONK). DKA tends to occur in individuals younger than 19 years, the more brittle of type 1 diabetic patients. However, DKA can affect diabetic patients of any age or sex. Risk Factors for Diabetic Ketoacidosis People with diabetes lack sufficient insulin, a hormone the body uses to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar) for energy. Therefore in diabetic patients glucose is not available as a fuel, so the body turns to fat stores for energy. However when fats are broken down they produce byproducts called ketones which build up in the blood and can be damaging to the body. In particular, accumulated ketones can “spill” over into the urine and make the blood become more acidic than body tissues (ketoacidosis). Blood gl Continue reading >>

More in ketosis