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Why Doctors Are Not Recommending Metformin

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

The most common medication used in women with PCOS is the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Research is strongly showing that long-term use of metformin and at high doses (1.5mg or higher daily) can deplete levels of vitamin B12. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause permanent neurological and nerve damage as well as mood changes and decreased energy. Here’s what you need to know to avoid a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take metformin. About Metformin Metformin is a medication that became available in the U.S. in 1995 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the most widely used medication used to lower insulin levels in those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Other names for metformin include glucophage, glucophage XR, glumetza, and fortamet. Metformin lowers blood glucose levels in three ways: It suppresses the liver’s production of glucose. It increases the sensitivity of your liver, muscle, fat, and cells to the insulin your body makes. It slows the absorption of carbohydrates you consume Metformin use may affect the absorption of vitamin B12 possibly through alterations in intestinal mobility, increased bacterial overgrowth, or alterations of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex. Metformin can cause a malabsorption in B12 due to digestive changes, which leads to the binding of B12-intrinsic factor complex (intrinsic factor is needed to absorb B12 in the gut) and a reduction of B12 absorption. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Metformin Users The largest study thus far to examine the link between metformin and vitamin B12 is the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DDPOS). This study looked at B12 levels of individuals with prediabetes who took 850 mg Metformin 2x/day and compared them to those taking a placebo. At 5 years, 4.3% of the metformin users had Continue reading >>

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The “natural” blood-sugar remedy that had been sidelined for far too long What I’m about to tell you may be shocking. And it’s sure to ruffle the feathers of many of the “natural know-it-alls.” But the science is clear, so I’m not afraid to say it: If you have unmanaged Type II diabetes, you should consider the drug metformin as a first line of treatment. And you won’t get the full story anywhere else, since the natural health industry wouldn’t be caught dead recommending a drug. So, please allow me to do the honors here… Think of it as your emergency “get out of jail free card” Diabetes is deadly. High blood sugar coursing through your body destroys your eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, and more. So the sooner you bring it down the better. (Just like high blood pressure, for which I also recommend tried and true medications as a first-line treatment for unmanaged hypertension.) And in this case, the science is clear—the drug metformin has been proven safe and effective for most people. And since it’s now a generic drug, it’s highly cost effective, too. Now don’t get me wrong…I’m not saying diet and exercise isn’t important. In fact, they’re the best means for preventing and even reversing Type II diabetes entirely. Something metformin can’t do. And there are certainly dietary supplements that can help with maintaining healthy blood sugar (like berberine). But Type II diabetes doesn’t develop overnight. And let’s face it, changing the habits and consequences that got us there in the first place isn’t an overnight task either. So if you need additional help, this is one rare instance where you shouldn’t be afraid to look at a mainstream therapy. And when an option this effective comes along to help kick-start your efforts saf Continue reading >>

Order Prescription Medications Metformin 500mg Tablet Price

Order Prescription Medications Metformin 500mg Tablet Price

Pills-only one or more blister packs containing 10 pills each. All teams under 60 pills are shipped in 1 package. Large orders can be split into two packs and come in 2 separate envelopes. Metformin can be used to gain control the level of blood glucose in people with type II diabetes. It is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but this Medicine is Not for treating type 1 diabetes type. over the counter metformin alternatives, metformin otc alternative, glimepiride 1mg metformin 500mg price, metformin drug prices, order metformin online, buy metformin without doctor, metformin hydrochloride for sale, where to buy metformin 1000mg, how to get metformin for weight loss, non prescription metformin You should also have in mind some possible delays in customs we are not responsible for. Thus why some parcels may arrive a bit later or earlier than expected. Delivery time can also depend on the country of destination. National and religious holidays may delay the arrival of a parcel. Your order will soon be completed discreetly for your privacy and security. Read this information carefully before you start taking this medicine and each time you refill your prescription. There may be new information. This advice can not replace doctor's recommendations. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if You do not know the number of this advice, or you would like to learn more about this medicine. Cells are more able to eliminate sugar in the blood. Viagra Metformin also slows the absorption of Sugars from the intestines. Metformin reduces blood sugar levels after eating. Our customers health and the speedy delivery is our Priority. Therefore, we keep the strictest standards of security and confidentiality to keep Your personal information, as well as the only e-Comm Continue reading >>

Common Drug Has The Potential To Slow Aging, Boost Cancer Recovery

Common Drug Has The Potential To Slow Aging, Boost Cancer Recovery

Some exciting research from the University of Montreal has found that the drug metformin, commonly prescribed for diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), has the potential to slow aging and fight cancer. The study, published in Aging Cell, found that metformin reduces the body's production of inflammatory cytokines, which accelerate aging. Metformin is the generic name for an oral drug that was approved by the FDA in 1994 to lower blood sugar. Brand names include Glucophage and Glucophage XR (Bristol-Myers Squibb), Fortamet (Shionogi), Glumetza and Glumetza XR (Santarus), and Riomet (Ranbaxy). Metformin was later found to stimulate ovulation, regulate periods, and increase fertility in women with PCOS and is now commonly prescribed for women whose PCOS hasn't responded to hormonal treatment alone. Found: New Potential to Slow Aging, and Slow Tumor Growth Cytokines have an important function in the body, activating the immune system to fight infection. But because they work by an inflammatory process, when they're overproduced they put the body into a state of chronic inflammation, which causes cells to age faster. Interestingly, the University of Montreal study found that the molecular pathways used to cause these anti-aging and anti-cancer benefits are not the same pathways used when metformin treats diabetes or PCOS. Previous research has suggested the anti-aging and anti-cancer possibilities of metformin, but had not gone as far as to document the mechanism that makes this happen. (Here's my previous reporting on how the inflammatory response ups the risk of stroke and other potentially fatal conditions.) Should You Ask Your Doctor About Metformin? If you're interested in Metformin's anti-aging potential in general, I doubt right now you'll get far asking your Continue reading >>

Glucophage

Glucophage

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 500 mg Each white, round, biconvex tablet, scored on one side and debossed with "HMR" on the other, contains metformin HCl 500 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: magnesium stearate and povidone. 850 mg Each white, oblong tablet, debossed with "HMR" on one side and "850" on the other, Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes…how To Fast Safely For A Medical Test

If You Have Diabetes…how To Fast Safely For A Medical Test

Recently, an employee at Bottom Line Publications was scheduled for a colonoscopy, the screening test for colon cancer. The medical test turned into medical mayhem. The day before the test, the woman followed her doctor’s orders to start ingesting a “clear liquid” diet, which includes soft drinks, Jell-O and other clear beverages and foods. But when she drank the “prep”—the bowel-cleaning solution that is consumed the evening before a colonoscopy (and sometimes also the morning of)—she vomited. Over and over. As a result, her colon wasn’t sufficiently emptied to conduct the test, which had to be postponed. What went wrong? The woman has diabetes—and her glucose (blood sugar) levels had become unstable, triggering nausea and vomiting. Yet not one medical professional—not a doctor, not a nurse, not a medical technician—had warned her that people with diabetes need to take special precautions with food and diabetes medicine whenever they have any medical test that involves an extended period of little or no eating. Unfortunately, this lack of diabetes-customized instruction about medical tests is very common. What you need to know… If you’re undergoing a test that requires only overnight fasting, which includes many types of CT scans, MRIs and X-rays, make sure that the test is scheduled for early in the morning—no later than 9 am. That way, you will be able to eat after the test by 10 am or 11 am, which will help to stabilize your blood sugar as much as possible. Don’t expect your blood sugar levels to be perfect after the test. The important thing is to keep them from getting too high or too low. Conventional dietitians and doctors specify clear liquids and foods that reflect the conventional American diet, such as regular soda, sports drink Continue reading >>

Safe Prescribing Of Metformin In Diabetes

Safe Prescribing Of Metformin In Diabetes

Metformin is the first-line pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes. It is the only glucose-lowering oral drug that has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with diabetes. The most common adverse effect is gastrointestinal upset. Starting at a low dose and increasing it slowly reduces this risk. Taking metformin with food also helps. Numerous contraindications to the use of metformin are listed in the product information, including reduced renal function. Strict adherence to these recommendations may deny a valuable drug to many patients. Introduction Metformin lowers both fasting and postprandial blood glucose. It reduces hepatic glucose output 1 and increases peripheral glucose uptake, and may delay intestinal glucose absorption. Its use is not associated with weight gain and hypoglycaemia is extremely rare when metformin is used on its own. It lowers triglyceride concentrations and has small but beneficial effects on total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the UK Prospective Diabetes Study metformin reduced diabetes-related and all-cause mortality, and reduced the risk of myocardial infarction in obese patients with type 2 diabetes when used as first-line therapy. It also reduced the risk of microvascular complications, but was no more effective than insulin or sulfonylureas. 2 A retrospective cohort study from the USA found a lower rate of hospitalisations for myocardial infarction and stroke and a reduced death rate when metformin was used first-line in type 2 diabetes in comparison with a sulfonylurea. 3 Metformin is effective when used with other glucose-lowering drugs. A standard-release (3000 mg/day maximum dose) and an extended-release preparation of metformin (2000 mg/day maximum dose) are available. The extended-release preparation can b Continue reading >>

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin Makes Headline News

Metformin is the first-line drug of choice in the treatment of type II diabetes. It was first approved in Europe in 1958.1 Americans had to wait until 1994 to legally obtain metformin.1 The holdup in approving metformin goes beyond the FDA. It is an indictment of a political/legal system that will forever cause needless suffering and death unless substantively changed. When Life Extension® informed Americans about drugs like metformin in the 1980s, the FDA did everything in its power to incarcerate me and shut down our Foundation.2 FDA propaganda at the time was that consumers needed to be "protected" against "unproven" therapies. As history has since proven, the result of the FDA's embargo has been unparalleled human carnage. So called "consumer protection" translated into ailing Americans being denied access to therapies that the FDA now claims are essential to saving lives. Today's major problem is not drugs available in other countries that Americans can't access. Instead, it is a political/legal system that suffocates medical innovation. Headline news stories earlier this year touted the anti-cancer effects of metformin, data that Foundation members were alerted to long ago.3 The problem is that it is illegal for metformin manufacturers to promote this drug to cancer patients or oncologists. It's also illegal to promote metformin to healthy people who want to reduce their risk of cancer, diabetes, vascular occlusion, and obesity. This fatal departure from reality continues unabated, as our dysfunctional political/legal system denies information about metformin that could spare countless numbers of lives. Type II diabetics suffer sharply higher rates of cancer4-7and vascular disease.8-11 The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been shown in numerous scientific studies Continue reading >>

Years Of Taking Popular Diabetes Drug Tied To Risk Of B12 Deficiency

Years Of Taking Popular Diabetes Drug Tied To Risk Of B12 Deficiency

Years of taking popular diabetes drug tied to risk of B12 deficiency (Reuters Health) - People taking metformin, a common type 2 diabetes medication, for several years may be at heightened risk of vitamin B12 deficiency and anemia, according to a new analysis of long-term data. Metformin helps to control the amount of sugar, or glucose, in the blood by reducing how much glucose is absorbed from food and produced by the liver, and by increasing the bodys response to the hormone insulin, according to the National Institutes of Health. Metformin is the most commonly used drug to treat type 2 diabetes, so many millions of people are taking it, usually for a prolonged period (many years), said senior study author Dr. Jill P Crandall of Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, by email. Smaller numbers of people take metformin for prevention of diabetes or treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome, Crandall told Reuters Health. The researchers used data from the Diabetes Prevention Program and the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study, which followed participants at high risk for type 2 diabetes for more than 10 years. The study began with more than 3,000 people age 25 years and older with high blood sugar. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either 850 milligrams of metformin twice daily, placebo medication or an intensive lifestyle program than did not include medication. For the new analysis only those taking placebo or metformin were considered, and about 50 participants were excluded after having weight-loss surgery, which would affect their diabetes outcomes. During follow-up, the participants provided blood samples at the five- and 13-year points. Using these blood samples, the researchers found that at year five, average B12 levels were Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Metformin | Hca Virginia

Metformin | Hca Virginia

DISCLAIMER: This Health Library is for educational purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the services provided by this practice/facility. AUDIENCE: Pharmacy, Nephrology, Internal Medicine, Patient ISSUE: FDA is requiring labeling changes regarding the recommendations for metformin-containing medicines for diabetes to expand metformin's use in certain patients with reduced kidney function. The current labeling strongly recommends against use of metformin in some patients whose kidneys do not work normally. FDA was asked to review numerous medical studies regarding the safety of metformin use in patients with mild to moderate impairment in kidney function, and to change the measure of kidney function in the metformin drug labeling that is used to determine whether a patient can receive metformin. FDA concluded, from the review of studies published in the medical literature, that metformin can be used safely in patients with mild impairment in kidney function and in some patients with moderate impairment in kidney function. FDA is requiring changes to the metformin labeling to reflect this new information and provide specific recommendations on the drug's use in patients with mild to moderate kidney impairment. FDA is also requiring manufacturers to revise the labeling to recommend that the measure of kidney function used to determine whether a patient can receive metformin be changed from one based on a single laboratory parameter (blood creatinine concentration) to one that provides a better estimate of renal function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate estimating equation (eGFR)). This is because in addition to blood creatinine concentration, the glomerular filtration rate takes into account additional parameters that are important, such as the patient's age, ge Continue reading >>

Glimepiride Side Effects

Glimepiride Side Effects

What Is Glimepiride (Amaryl)? Glimepiride is the generic name of the prescription drug Amaryl, used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. Glimepiride belongs to a class of drugs known as sulfonylureas. It stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin and helps the body use insulin more efficiently. The drug can also decrease the chances that someone will develop life-threatening complications of type 2 diabetes. The drug was approved by the FDA in 1995 and is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. Glimepiride comes in tablet form and is usually taken once a day. It may be used alone, or in combination with insulin or another oral medication such as metformin. Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of the medication and gradually increase your dose if needed. If you've taken glimepiride for a long period of time, the drug may not control blood sugar as well as it did when you first started the treatment. Your doctor will adjust the dosage as needed. Glimepiride Warnings Glimepiride helps control blood sugar, but it will not cure your diabetes. You should continue to take glimepiride even if you feel well. This medication should not be used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes, a disease in which the body does not produce insulin. Glimepiride will only help lower blood sugar if your body produces insulin naturally. In one study, patients who took a medication similar to glimepiride to treat diabetes were more likely to die of heart problems than those who were treated with diet changes and insulin. Talk to your doctor about the risks of this treatment. While taking glimepiride, you should tell your doctor if you: Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding Are having surgery, including dental surgery Have ever had G6PD deficiency (a genetic blood diso Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drugs: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Drugs: What You Need To Know

Have you ever heard of a diabetic getting healthier once he or she started taking metformin (Glucophage) or some other diabetic drug? Of course not! Gee, I wonder why .. Unfortunately, most diabetics are prescribed a diabetic drug such as metformin (Glucophage) by their doctors once they have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. This drug (and other diabetes drugs) helps to lower your blood glucose back to the normal range. So it appears that the drug is working. Right? It depends on what you mean by "working". It addresses one of the primary symptoms of diabetes -- high blood glucose levels -- by lowering your blood glucose, hopefully back to the normal range. However, the drug doesn't do anything to actually stop the progression of the diabetes. But, because it lowers your blood glucose, it gives you the false sense of security that the drug is actually helping with your diabetes. Sure, in the short term, the drug does help a little bit, because it helps to lower your blood sugar. But, the doctor fails to tell you that the drug does absolutely nothing to stop the spread of the cell and tissue damage being caused by the diabetes! In fact, over a period of years, the drug may actually cause damage to the liver and kidneys! If you have an adverse reaction* to the drug (such as an upset stomach or diarrhea), your doctor will not tell you why this is happening -- instead, he/she will just put you on a different drug such as glimepiride (Amaryl) or glipizide (Glucotrol). *p.s. The reason why you have an adverse reaction is because your body is smart enough to know that something is wrong. Your body reacts negatively to most toxins by sending you a signal (upset stomach, diarrhea) letting you know that something is wrong. So, be careful, not to jump at taking this drug or an Continue reading >>

An Old-line Diabetes Drug May Have New Uses Against Diseases Of Aging

An Old-line Diabetes Drug May Have New Uses Against Diseases Of Aging

Just over a year ago, Catherine Price decided to start taking one of the cheapest, safest, oldest, most widely prescribed drugs for Type 2 diabetes. So much metformin is taken in the United States — some 72 million prescriptions were written for it in 2013 — that a recent study found higher trace levels of it (presumably from the urine of people taking it) in Lake Michigan than of any other drug, including caffeine. But Price, a science and medical reporter in Oakland, Calif., doesn’t have Type 2 diabetes. She has Type 1, the far less common form of the disease, which requires lifelong treatment with insulin, to compensate for her body’s failure to produce enough of the hormone. However, she had read studies indicating that metformin combined with insulin might help Type 1 diabetics, too. Moreover, the drug was being studied in clinical trials as a way to lower the risk of cancer, heart disease and dementia — not just for diabetics, but for everyone. For Price, there was yet another possible benefit — as a treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome, an endocrine disorder that doctors thought might explain the difficulty she and her husband had had conceiving. Sure enough, a month and a half after she had started taking metformin pills and even as she was enjoying the benefits of better blood-sugar control, Price became pregnant, eventually giving birth to a girl. “I’m still taking metformin along with my insulin,” said Price, 36, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes 14 years ago. “I remember eating Mexican food one night, which can be a potential disaster for people with diabetes because of the carbs, but I noticed I needed only two-thirds to a half of the insulin I normally needed.” Synthesized in the 1920s, metformin was first approved for treatme Continue reading >>

What Next When Metformin Isn't Enough For Type 2 Diabetes?

What Next When Metformin Isn't Enough For Type 2 Diabetes?

› Turn first to metformin for pharmacologic treatment of type 2 diabetes. A › Add a second oral agent (such as a sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor), a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, or basal insulin if metformin at a maximum tolerated dose does not achieve the HbA1c target over 3 months. A › Progress to bolus mealtime insulin or a GLP-1 agonist to cover postprandial glycemic excursions if HbA1c remains above goal despite an adequate trial of basal insulin. A Strength of recommendation (SOR) A Good-quality patient-oriented evidence B Inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence C Consensus, usual practice, opinion, disease-oriented evidence, case series The "Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes" guidelines published in 2015 by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) state that metformin is the preferred initial pharmacotherapy for managing type 2 diabetes.1 Metformin, a biguanide, enhances insulin sensitivity in muscle and fat tissue and inhibits hepatic glucose production. Advantages of metformin include the longstanding research supporting its efficacy and safety, an expected decrease in the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 1% to 1.5%, low cost, minimal hypoglycemic risk, and potential reductions in cardiovascular (CV) events due to decreased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.1,2 To minimize adverse gastrointestinal effects, start metformin at 500 mg once or twice a day and titrate upward every one to 2 weeks to the target dose.3 To help guide dosing decisions, use the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) instead of the serum creatinine (SCr) level, because the SCr can translate into a variable range of eGFRs (TABLE 1).4,5 What if metfo Continue reading >>

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