diabetestalk.net

Why Do You Get Hyperkalemia In Dka?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Definition: A hyperglycemic, acidotic state caused by insulin deficiency. The disease state consists of 3 parameters: Hyperglycemia (glucose > 250 mg/dl) Acidosis Ketosis Epidemiology Incidence of ~ 10,000 cases/year in US Mortality rate: 2-5% (prior to insulin was 100%) (Lebovitz 1995) Pathophysiology Insulin deficiency leads to serum glucose rise Increased glucose load in kidney leads to increased glucose in urine and osmotic diuresis Osmotic diuresis is accompanied by loss of electrolytes including sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium Volume depletion leads to impaired glomerular filtration rate (GFR) Inability to properly metabolize glucose results in fatty acid breakdown with resultant ketone bodies (acetoacetate + beta-hydroxybutyrate) Causes: An acute insult leads to decompensation of a chronic disease. Can also be first manifestation of new onset diabetes (particularly in children). Below are common triggers Infection (particularly sepsis) Myocardial ischemia or infarction Medication non-compliance Clinical Presentation History Polydipsia, polyuria, polyphagia Weakness Weight loss Nausea/Vomiting Abdominal Pain Physical Examination Acetone odor on breath (“fruity” smell) Kussmaul’s respirations – deep fast breathing (tachypnea and hyperpnea) Tachycardia Hypotension Altered mental status Abdominal tenderness Diagnostic Testing Definitive diagnosis is established by laboratory criteria as detailed above (hyperglycemia, ketosis and acidosis) Essential Diagnostic Tests Serum glucose Typically > 350 mg/dL Euglycemic DKA (< 300 mg/dL) reported in up to 18% of patients Blood gas Patients will exhibit an anion gap metabolic Electrolytes: hypo/hyper/normokalemia, hyponatremia Arterial or venous blood gas can be used (Savage 2011) Urinalysis Glucosuria Ketonur Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

Objectives After completing this article, readers should be able to: Describe the typical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis in children. Discuss the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Explain the potential complications of diabetic ketoacidosis that can occur during treatment. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) represents a profound insulin-deficient state characterized by hyperglycemia (>200 mg/dL [11.1 mmol/L]) and acidosis (serum pH <7.3, bicarbonate <15 mEq/L [15 mmol/L]), along with evidence of an accumulation of ketoacids in the blood (measurable serum or urine ketones, increased anion gap). Dehydration, electrolyte loss, and hyperosmolarity contribute to the presentation and potential complications. DKA is the most common cause of death in children who have type 1 diabetes. Therefore, the best treatment of DKA is prevention through early recognition and diagnosis of diabetes in a child who has polydipsia and polyuria and through careful attention to the treatment of children who have known diabetes, particularly during illnesses. Presentation Patients who have DKA generally present with nausea and vomiting. In individuals who have no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, a preceding history of polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss usually can be elicited. With significant ketosis, patients may have a fruity breath. As the DKA becomes more severe, patients develop lethargy due to the acidosis and hyperosmolarity; in severe DKA, they may present with coma. Acidosis and ketosis cause an ileus that can lead to abdominal pain severe enough to raise concern for an acutely inflamed abdomen, and the elevation of the stress hormones epinephrine and cortisol in DKA can lead to an elevation in the white blood cell count, suggesting infection. Thus, leukocytosi Continue reading >>

Hyperkalaemia In Adults

Hyperkalaemia In Adults

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Dietary Potassium article more useful, or one of our other health articles. Description Hyperkalaemia is defined as plasma potassium in excess of 5.5 mmol/L[1]. The European Resuscitation Guidelines further classify hyperkalaemia as: Mild - 5.5-5.9 mmol/L. Moderate - 6.0-6.4 mmol/L. Severe - >6.5 mmol/L. Potassium is the most abundant intracellular cation - 98% of it being located intracellularly. Hyperkalaemia has four broad causes: Renal causes - eg, due to decreased excretion or drugs. Increased circulation of potassium - can be exogenous or endogenous. A shift from the intracellular to the extracellular space. Pseudohyperkalaemia. Epidemiology The time of greatest risk is at the extremes of life. Reported incidence in hospitals is 1-10%, with reduced renal function causing a five-fold increase in risk in patients on potassium-influencing drugs[2]. Men are more likely than women to develop hyperkalaemia, whilst women are more likely to experience hypokalaemia. Renal causes Acute kidney injury (AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD): Normally all potassium that is ingested is absorbed and excretion is 90% renal and 10% alimentary. Most excretion by the gut is via the colon and in CKD this can maintain a fairly normal blood level of potassium. It seems likely that the elevated potassium levels in CKD trigger the excretion of potassium via the colon[3]. Patients with CKD must be careful of foods rich in potassium. Hyperkalaemic renal tubular acidosis. Mineralocorticoid deficiency. Medicines that interfere with potassium excretion - eg, amiloride, spironolac Continue reading >>

Electrolyte And Acid–base Disturbances In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Electrolyte And Acid–base Disturbances In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Electrolyte disturbances are common in patients with diabetes mellitus. This review highlights the ways in which specific electrolytes may be influenced by the dysregulation of glucose homeostasis. Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org. No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (B.F.P.); and the Biomedical Research Department, Diabetes and Obesity Research Division, Cedars–Sinai Medical Center, Beverly Hills, CA (D.J.C.). Address reprint requests to Dr. Palmer at the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75390, or at [email protected] Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia

Hyperkalemia

Objectives The objectives of this module will be to: Describe the classic presentation of a patient with hyperkalemia. Name the electrocardiographic manifestations of hyperkalemia. List the principles of managing a patient with hyperkalemia. Introduction Hyperkalemia is a metabolic abnormality seen frequently in the Emergency Department. The most common condition leading to hyperkalemia is missed dialysis in a patient with end stage renal disease (ESRD), but many other conditions can predispose an individual to hyperkalemia, such as acute renal failure, extensive burns, trauma, or severe rhabdomyolysis or severe acidosis. Other conditions that can be associated with hyperkalemia are acute digoxin toxicity and adrenal insufficiency. In rare circumstances, hyperkalemia can become so significant that cardiac dysrhythmias and subsequent death can occur; therefore, rapid identification and appropriate treatment are paramount to properly treating this condition. Initial Actions and Primary Survey The primary survey should focus on assessing airway, breathing and circulation. Since many patients with severe hyperkalemia will have renal dysfunction, some may be fluid overloaded and may present with pulmonary edema and respiratory distress. Traditionally, the electrocardiogram (ECG) has been used as a surrogate marker for clinically significant hyperkalemia. Patients suspected of having hyperkalemia (chronic renal failure, severe diabetic ketoacidosis, etc.) should be placed on a cardiac monitor and a 12-lead electrocardiogram should be performed immediately. Concurrently, intravenous access should be obtained and a blood sample should be sent to the laboratory for a basic metabolic profile. Differential Diagnosis Hyperkalemia Pseudohyperkalemia Thrombocytosis Erythrocytosis Leu Continue reading >>

Search This Resource

Search This Resource

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe form of complicated diabetes mellitus (DM) which requires emergency care. Ketones are synthesized from fatty acids as a substitute form of energy, because glucose is not effectively entered into the cells. Excess keto-acids results in acidosis and severe electrolyte abnormalities, which can be life threatening. Pathophysiology Ketone bodies are synthesized as an alternative source of energy, when intracellular glucose concentration can not meet metabolic demands. Ketone bodies are synthesized from acetyl-CoA which is a product of mitochondrial ß-oxidation of fatty acids. Synthesis of acetyl-CoA is facilitated by decreased insulin concentration and increased glucagon concentration. In non-diabetics acetyl-CoA and pyruvate enter the citric acid cycle to form ATP. However, in diabetics, production of pyruvate by glycolysis is decreased. The activity of the citric acid cycle is therefore diminished resulting in decreased utilization of Acetyl-CoA. The net effect of increased production and decreased utilization of acetyl-CoA is an increase in the concentration of acetyl-CoA which is the precursor for ketone body synthesis.1 The three ketone bodies synthesized from acetyl-CoA include beta hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone. Acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate are anions of moderately strong acids. Therefore, accumulation of these ketone bodies results in ketotic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis and the electrolyte abnormalities which ensue are important determinants in the outcome of patients with DKA.2 One of the beliefs regarding the pathophysiology of DKA had been that individuals that develop DKA have zero or undetectable endogenous insulin concentration. However, in a study that included 7 dogs with DKA it was Continue reading >>

Severe Hyperkalaemia In Association With Diabetic Ketoacidosis In A Patient Presenting With Severe Generalized Muscle Weakness

Severe Hyperkalaemia In Association With Diabetic Ketoacidosis In A Patient Presenting With Severe Generalized Muscle Weakness

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, life‐threatening metabolic complication of diabetes mellitus. Hyperglycaemia, ketosis (ketonaemia or ketonuria) and acidosis are the cardinal features of DKA [1]. Other features that indicate the severity of DKA include volume depletion, acidosis and concurrent electrolyte disturbances, especially abnormalities of potassium homeostasis [1,2]. We describe a type 2 diabetic patient presenting with severe generalized muscle weakness and electrocardiographic evidence of severe hyperkalaemia in association with DKA and discuss the related pathophysiology. A 65‐year‐old male was admitted because of impaired mental status. He was a known insulin‐treated diabetic on quinapril (20 mg once daily) and was taking oral ampicillin 500 mg/day because of dysuria which had started 5 days prior to admission. He was disoriented in place and time with severe generalized muscle weakness; he was apyrexial (temperature 36.4°C), tachycardic (120 beats/min) and tachypneic (25 respirations/min) with cold extremities (supine blood pressure was 100/60 mmHg). An electrocardiogram (ECG) showed absent P waves, widening of QRS (‘sine wave’ in leads I, II, V5 and V6), depression of ST segments and tall peaked symmetrical T waves in leads V3–V6 (Figure 1). Blood glucose was 485 mg/dl, plasma creatinine 5.1 mg/dl (reference range (r.r.) 0.6–1.2 mg/dl, measured by the Jaffe method), urea 270 mg/dl (r.r. 11–54 mg/dl), albumin 4.2 g/dl (r.r. 3.4–4.7 g/dl), sodium 136 mmol/l (r.r. 135–145 mmol/l), chloride 102 mmol/l (r.r. 98–107 mmol/l), potassium 8.3 mmol/l (r.r. 3.5–5.4 mmol/l), phosphorus 1.6 mmol/l (r.r. 0.8–1.45 mmol/l) and magnesium 0.62 mmol/l (r.r. 0.75–1.25 mmol/l). A complete blood count revealed leukocytosis (12 090/µl with Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

CE credit is no longer available for this article. Expired July 2005 Originally posted April 2004 VERONICA CRUMP, RN, BSN VERONICA CRUMP is a nurse on the surgical unit of Morristown Memorial Hospital in Morristown, N.J. She's also a subacute care nurse in the hospital's rehabilitation division. KEY WORDS: hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS), diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hepatic glucose production, proteolysis, hepatic gluconeogenesis, ketone bodies, metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, hypokalemia When a patient presents with markedly high blood glucose levels, the consequences can be fatal. Here's how to get your patient through the crisis. Edith Schafer, age 71, has just been admitted to your ICU with pneumonia, which she developed at home. She has a history of Type 2 diabetes. In addition to a temperature of 102° F (38.9° C), she has rapid, shallow breathing and dry, flushed skin. Her blood pressure is 96/70 mm Hg, and she's so lethargic that she's unable to keep her eyes open. Her lab results show a serum glucose level of 900 mg/dL. In addition to the pneumonia, Mrs. Schafer is suffering from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS). Severe hyperglycemia is a complication of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It can indicate HHS or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), another life-threatening condition. HHS tends to occur in patients with Type 2 diabetes, like Mrs. Schafer, while Type 1 diabetics are more likely to develop DKA. However, DKA can occur in Type 2 diabetes as well.1 HHS and DKA can be set off by infection, stress, missed medication, and other causes. In Mrs. Schafer's case, the trigger was pneumonia, a common cause of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes. No matter what the cause, though, a case of HHS or DKA can turn deadly if not caught in time. The m Continue reading >>

Pulmcrit- Dominating The Acidosis In Dka

Pulmcrit- Dominating The Acidosis In Dka

Management of acidosis in DKA is an ongoing source of confusion. There isn’t much high-quality evidence, nor will there ever be (1). However, a clear understanding of the physiology of DKA may help us treat this rationally and effectively. Physiology of ketoacidosis in DKA Ketoacidosis occurs due to an imbalance between insulin dose and insulin requirement: Many factors affect the insulin requirement: Individuals differ in their baseline insulin resistance and insulin requirements. Physiologic stress (e.g. hypovolemia, inflammation) increases the level of catecholamines and cortisol, which increases insulin resistance. Hyperglycemia and metabolic acidosis themselves increase insulin resistance (Souto 2011, Gosmanov 2014). DKA treatment generally consists of two phases: first, we must manage the ketoacidosis. Later, we must prepare the patient to transition back to their home insulin regimen. During both phases, success depends on balancing insulin dose and insulin requirement. Phase I (Take-off): Initial management of the DKA patient with worrisome acidosis Let’s start by considering a patient who presents in severe DKA with worrisome acidosis. This is uncommon. Features that might provoke worry include the following: bicarbonate < 7 mEq/L pH < 7 (if measured; there is generally little benefit from measuring pH) clinically ill-appearing (e.g., dyspnea, marked Kussmaul respirations) These patients generally have severe metabolic acidosis with respiratory compensation. This creates two concerns: If the metabolic acidosis worsens, they may decompensate. The patient is depending on respiratory compensation to maintain their pH. If they should fatigue and lose the ability to hyperventilate, their pH would drop. It is important to reverse the acidosis before the patient m Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia (high Blood Potassium)

Hyperkalemia (high Blood Potassium)

How does hyperkalemia affect the body? Potassium is critical for the normal functioning of the muscles, heart, and nerves. It plays an important role in controlling activity of smooth muscle (such as the muscle found in the digestive tract) and skeletal muscle (muscles of the extremities and torso), as well as the muscles of the heart. It is also important for normal transmission of electrical signals throughout the nervous system within the body. Normal blood levels of potassium are critical for maintaining normal heart electrical rhythm. Both low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia) and high blood potassium levels (hyperkalemia) can lead to abnormal heart rhythms. The most important clinical effect of hyperkalemia is related to electrical rhythm of the heart. While mild hyperkalemia probably has a limited effect on the heart, moderate hyperkalemia can produce EKG changes (EKG is a reading of theelectrical activity of the heart muscles), and severe hyperkalemia can cause suppression of electrical activity of the heart and can cause the heart to stop beating. Another important effect of hyperkalemia is interference with functioning of the skeletal muscles. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a rare inherited disorder in which patients can develop sudden onset of hyperkalemia which in turn causes muscle paralysis. The reason for the muscle paralysis is not clearly understood, but it is probably due to hyperkalemia suppressing the electrical activity of the muscle. Common electrolytes that are measured by doctors with blood testing include sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate. The functions and normal range values for these electrolytes are described below. Hypokalemia, or decreased potassium, can arise due to kidney diseases; excessive losses due to heavy sweating Continue reading >>

How Iv Insulin Can Kill Your Patient

How Iv Insulin Can Kill Your Patient

You have a patient that comes up to your unit with a blood sugar of 952. The labs are sent off and the patient is found to be in severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The doctor puts in the orders for serial lab work, fluid boluses, electrolyte replacements, and an insulin drip. As a newer nurse, you are familiar with labs, boluses, your replacement protocols, but have never administered insulin through an IV. What nursing interventions do you need to perform to safely care for this patient? How Does Insulin Work? Insulin is a hormone created by the pancreas. It allows your body to use glucose to provide the body's cells with the necessary energy they need. Insulin production from the pancreas is based off of your blood sugar levels. If you are getting hyperglycemic, the pancreas is signaled and insulin is released into the bloodstream. Insulin then signals different cells to absorb the glucose and use it as energy or store it for later use. When insulin facilitates glucose being pulled into a cell, a potassium cation is also pulled from extracellular fluid (meaning the bloodstream) into the intracellular fluid. How does this affect our patients? Initially, patients in DKA have an increased extracellular potassium level due to the hyperglycemia and acidosis they are experiencing. This potassium level is quickly decreased as blood glucose is pulled into the cells. Administration As with all critical care medications, be sure to check your hospital's policy for administration. I have seen two main situations in which IV insulin (meaning regular insulin, not Lantus, Aspart, etc.) is given. Treatment of DKA: It seems like each hospital has a different protocol they use to manage DKA patients with. Commonly patients are treated with a bolus of regular insulin IV and then place Continue reading >>

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells with an alternative energy source, the body breaks down adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids (FFAs) into the bloodstream. The liver subsequently converts FFAs to triglycerides and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies (i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid, b-hydroxybutyric acid) can be used as energy by the tissues when there is a lack of glucose or nutritional intake.1,2 The breakdown of fat, combined with the body's inability to use glucose, causes many pets with diabetes to present with weight loss, despite having a ravenous appetite. If diabetes is undiagnosed or uncontrolled, a series of metab Continue reading >>

More in ketosis