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Why Do Plants Store Glucose?

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What Part Of Plant Can Store Extra Food As Sugar Or Starch?

Healthy plants tend to create much more food than they can immediately use. The excess food is stored as sugars and starches in various parts of the plants. These stores provide a source of energy not only for the plants, but also for the animals and humans that eat them. Plant Foods Carbohydrates are the simplest types of foods manufactured and stored by plants. Sugar and starch are two types of carbohydrates. Plant food is made in the leaves, where the green compound chlorophyll absorbs energy from the sun in a process called photosynthesis. Glucose Glucose is a simple sugar that is stored in large quantities in the stems of some plants. One example is the thick stems of the corn plant. Fructose Fructose is another simple sugar. Its chemical composition is slightly different from that of glucose and usually is stored in fruit. For this reason, it commonly is called fruit sugar. Complex Sugars Some plants, such as sugar cane and sugar beets, are very efficient at creating and storing complex sugars. These plants take the simple sugars, glucose and fructose, and create a higher form of sugar that is stored in either the stems, such as in the cane, or the roots, as in the sugar beet Continue reading >>

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  1. Santi Santichaivekin

    I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?

  2. Jayachandran

    Glucose, fructose and galactose are the three dietary monosaccharides. Glucose and Fructose are simple monosaccharides found in plants. A monosaccharide is the basic unit of carbohydrate and the simplest form of sugar, glucose are aldose and Fructose are ketose.
    If the carbonyl is at position 1 (that is, n or m is zero), the molecule begins with a formyl group H(C=O)-, and is technically an aldehyde. In that case, the compound is termed an aldose. Otherwise, the molecule has a keto group, a carbonyl -(C=O)- between two carbons; then it is formally a ketone, and is termed a ketose. Ketoses of biological interest usually have the carbonyl at position 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosaccharide
    Whereas Sucrose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. A disaccharide is more complex than monosaccharide, more complex compounds like oligosaccharides and polysaccharides exists. Sucrose synthesised within the cytosol of photosynthesizing cells is then available for general distribution and is commonly trans located to other carbon-demanding centers via the phloem.
    Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy efficient sucrose is chosen to be the carrier of energy from leaves to different part of the tree. Another problem exists, glucose is highly reactive and this may result in some intermediate reactions while transporting glucose. Being a complex structure, sucrose is not as much reactive as glucose. So plants uses the sucrose as a medium to transfer energy. Inside the cells, sucrose is converted back to glucose and fructose. Energy is yielded when it is needed. So plants transfer glucose and fructose in the form of sucrose in order to:
    Increase energy storage
    Efficient energy transfer
    Removing in between reactions
    References
    Carbohydrates
    Sucrose & Starch Biosynthesis
    Sucrose Metabolism
    Sucrose and starch synthesis
    Disaccharide

  3. graphene

    there is no free glucose in the photosynthesis. Stop to spread that myth. The net product is G3P. The end products of photosynthesis are sucrose and starch, but never glucose. Do you test glucose in the leaves? No... it is always for starch. ;) The G3P is converted to sucrose and other molecules, for example, thiamine. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate occurs as a reactant in the biosynthesis pathway of thiamine (Vitamin B1), another substance that cannot be produced by the human body. Part of sucrose is then translocated to the phloem. Starch is stored in the stroma of chloroplasts. It is also stored in the amyloplasts in the roots, stems cells after sucrose suffers a conversion to starch.

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Molecular structure of glucose. Monosaccharide structure. Linear and ring forms. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/b... Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/b... Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82q... Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_...

Macromolecules Flashcards | Quizlet

When long monosaccharide chains are linked together. A polysaccharide made of only glucose subunits. What is eating starch the consumption of? A polysaccaride used by animals to store glucose. Where do humans store small amounts of carbohydrates as glycogen? What are excess carbohydrates converted to? Through cellulose which makes up a plant's cell walls and the primary component of dietary fiber that's indigestible by most animals. Can certain organisms like termite and cows consume cellulose? Only through bacteria, fungi, or protists. When organisms with digestive enzymes break down carbohydrates into their component monosaccharides. What happens when the bonds break between sugars? Digestion when the food we eat is bigger than one sugar so it's too big to enter our cells. Biochemicals that do not dissolve in water (fats, oils, and waxes) make up cell membranes, store energy What are storage molecules in plants and animals? Adipose tissue until food intake is lower than metabolic needs. In seeds that contain fat that can be metabolized for energy. Amino acid subunits that make up the molecule What do side groups that are part of the amino acids interact with each other for? By s Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Santi Santichaivekin

    I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?

  2. Jayachandran

    Glucose, fructose and galactose are the three dietary monosaccharides. Glucose and Fructose are simple monosaccharides found in plants. A monosaccharide is the basic unit of carbohydrate and the simplest form of sugar, glucose are aldose and Fructose are ketose.
    If the carbonyl is at position 1 (that is, n or m is zero), the molecule begins with a formyl group H(C=O)-, and is technically an aldehyde. In that case, the compound is termed an aldose. Otherwise, the molecule has a keto group, a carbonyl -(C=O)- between two carbons; then it is formally a ketone, and is termed a ketose. Ketoses of biological interest usually have the carbonyl at position 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosaccharide
    Whereas Sucrose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. A disaccharide is more complex than monosaccharide, more complex compounds like oligosaccharides and polysaccharides exists. Sucrose synthesised within the cytosol of photosynthesizing cells is then available for general distribution and is commonly trans located to other carbon-demanding centers via the phloem.
    Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy efficient sucrose is chosen to be the carrier of energy from leaves to different part of the tree. Another problem exists, glucose is highly reactive and this may result in some intermediate reactions while transporting glucose. Being a complex structure, sucrose is not as much reactive as glucose. So plants uses the sucrose as a medium to transfer energy. Inside the cells, sucrose is converted back to glucose and fructose. Energy is yielded when it is needed. So plants transfer glucose and fructose in the form of sucrose in order to:
    Increase energy storage
    Efficient energy transfer
    Removing in between reactions
    References
    Carbohydrates
    Sucrose & Starch Biosynthesis
    Sucrose Metabolism
    Sucrose and starch synthesis
    Disaccharide

  3. graphene

    there is no free glucose in the photosynthesis. Stop to spread that myth. The net product is G3P. The end products of photosynthesis are sucrose and starch, but never glucose. Do you test glucose in the leaves? No... it is always for starch. ;) The G3P is converted to sucrose and other molecules, for example, thiamine. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate occurs as a reactant in the biosynthesis pathway of thiamine (Vitamin B1), another substance that cannot be produced by the human body. Part of sucrose is then translocated to the phloem. Starch is stored in the stroma of chloroplasts. It is also stored in the amyloplasts in the roots, stems cells after sucrose suffers a conversion to starch.

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In this video I discuss the what are carbohydrates and the types of carbohydrates. The pros and cons to each type, and the best carbs to eat. Transcript Types of carbs So, what are the different types of carbohydrates? The answer to this question depends on who you ask. Some common classifications would be healthy and unhealthy, good and bad, slow and fast. In this video I am going to classify them as simple, complex and fibrous. Before we get into those classifications, we need to look at molecules. I know, fun stuff, but it will help you understand better. A monosaccharide is a single molecule, such as fructose, which is found in fruit. A disaccharide consists of 2 monosaccharide molecules, such as sucrose or table sugar. And a polysaccharide consists of many monosaccharide molecules, such as in whole grain pasta. Now that we have that out of the way, lets look at simple carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are made up of mono and disaccharides, 1 or 2 molecules. Some foods include, fruits, milk, and foods with high amounts of added sugars. Typically simple carbohydrates are easily absorbed into the bloodstream because of their simple molecular structure. However, when you obtain simple carbohydrates from whole foods, they are usually combined with vitamins, minerals and fiber, which slows down the digestive process. Now, lets look at complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are composed of polysaccharides, so, because of their more complex molecular structure, they can take longer for the body to break down and digest, like whole grains and vegetables. However, some complex carbohydrate foods have been processed, which strips them of some of their natural, high fiber content as well as vitamins and minerals, so they are digested faster and more easily. So, with both simple and complex carbohydrates I have mentioned fast and slow digestion. Why is that important? 3 reasons, #1 is it is going to make you feel fuller longer, rapid digestion means hunger returns quicker which leads to more consumption. #2, typically slower digested foods cause lower blood level spikes, and #3, slower, longer digestion means the body is using more energy over a longer period of time to break down the food, which is an increase or boost in metabolism. Next up is fiber. Fiber is parts of plants that cant be digested. I have a separate video that looks deeper into fiber that I will link in the little I in the upper right-hand corner of your screen. Bottom line. So, the question is what type of carbohydrates should you eat. That is actually very easy to answer. All 3 types. Don’t focus on the types, instead, focus on Carbohydrates that have been minimally processed, like whole grain pasta, and whole wheat bread, also Fruits and vegetables that contain fiber, vitamins and minerals. And of course anything from dairy queen. Ah, just joking with ya folks. Seriously though, minimize the consumption of the processed foods, if you can eliminated them great, if not, its about moderation. Its ok to eat the foods you love, you just have to do it in moderation. Other sources... http://www.builtlean.com/2012/05/17/c... http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/healt... http://www.livestrong.com/article/133...

Role Of Carbohydrates

Life on this planet needs a constant supply of energy in order to fight the effects of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics. The most abundant source of this energy is the sun, where vast amounts of radiant energy are created in the nuclear fusion furnaces. A tiny part of this radiant energy reaches this planet in the form of light, where a tiny part, of a tiny part of this energy is absorbed by plants and converted from light energy into chemical energy. This is the process called photosynthesis. Pigments in special cellular organelles trap quanta of light energy and convert them to high energy electrons. These high energy electrons are in turn used to move electrons in covalent bonds to a higher energy state. In this process atoms and bonds in carbon dioxide and water are rearranged and new molecules are created. Quanta of light energy are used to pull electrons in covalent bonds to higher energy levels where they are stable and stored for future use. Two important molecular products are produced in this process; oxygen, which is released into the atmosphere, and 3-phosphoglyceric acid, which is kept inside the cells. All plants create 3-phosphoglyceric acid (3PG) as the Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Santi Santichaivekin

    I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?

  2. Jayachandran

    Glucose, fructose and galactose are the three dietary monosaccharides. Glucose and Fructose are simple monosaccharides found in plants. A monosaccharide is the basic unit of carbohydrate and the simplest form of sugar, glucose are aldose and Fructose are ketose.
    If the carbonyl is at position 1 (that is, n or m is zero), the molecule begins with a formyl group H(C=O)-, and is technically an aldehyde. In that case, the compound is termed an aldose. Otherwise, the molecule has a keto group, a carbonyl -(C=O)- between two carbons; then it is formally a ketone, and is termed a ketose. Ketoses of biological interest usually have the carbonyl at position 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosaccharide
    Whereas Sucrose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. A disaccharide is more complex than monosaccharide, more complex compounds like oligosaccharides and polysaccharides exists. Sucrose synthesised within the cytosol of photosynthesizing cells is then available for general distribution and is commonly trans located to other carbon-demanding centers via the phloem.
    Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy efficient sucrose is chosen to be the carrier of energy from leaves to different part of the tree. Another problem exists, glucose is highly reactive and this may result in some intermediate reactions while transporting glucose. Being a complex structure, sucrose is not as much reactive as glucose. So plants uses the sucrose as a medium to transfer energy. Inside the cells, sucrose is converted back to glucose and fructose. Energy is yielded when it is needed. So plants transfer glucose and fructose in the form of sucrose in order to:
    Increase energy storage
    Efficient energy transfer
    Removing in between reactions
    References
    Carbohydrates
    Sucrose & Starch Biosynthesis
    Sucrose Metabolism
    Sucrose and starch synthesis
    Disaccharide

  3. graphene

    there is no free glucose in the photosynthesis. Stop to spread that myth. The net product is G3P. The end products of photosynthesis are sucrose and starch, but never glucose. Do you test glucose in the leaves? No... it is always for starch. ;) The G3P is converted to sucrose and other molecules, for example, thiamine. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate occurs as a reactant in the biosynthesis pathway of thiamine (Vitamin B1), another substance that cannot be produced by the human body. Part of sucrose is then translocated to the phloem. Starch is stored in the stroma of chloroplasts. It is also stored in the amyloplasts in the roots, stems cells after sucrose suffers a conversion to starch.

  4. -> Continue reading
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