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Why Do Ketone Bodies Cause Acidosis?

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Moof's Medical Biochemistry Video Course: http://moof-university.thinkific.com/... In this video, I describe how Ketone Bodies are oxidized for energy. The liver makes ketone bodies that travel through the blood to extrahepatic tissues, where they are oxidized in the mitochondrial matrix to give energy. The pathway begins with D--Hydroxybutyrate, as it is oxidized to Acetoacetate by the same D--Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase reaction (except in reverse). The Acetoacetate is then activated to Acetoacetyl-CoA by -Ketoacyl-CoA Transferase (also known as Thiophorase); this second step takes a Coenzyme A from Succinyl-CoA (an intermediate of the Krebs Cycle). The Acetoacetyl-CoA is then cleaved into two Acetyl-CoA molecules that can go through the Krebs Cycle to be oxidized, resulting in energy that cell can use. Ultimately, the liver is basically sending Acetyl-CoA that it isnt metabolizing to other tissues (by way of Ketone Bodies in the blood) so that those other tissues can utilize the Acetyl-CoA. However, sometimes, the extrahepatic tissues do not oxidize the ketone bodies rapidly enough to keep up with the pace at which they are arriving from the blood. This is a problem described in more detail in the next video in the series. For a suggested viewing order of the videos, information on tutoring, personalized video solutions, and an opportunity to support Moof University financially, visit MoofUniversity.com, and follow Moof University on the different social media platforms. Don't forget to LIKE, COMMENT, and SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Ketone Bodies Formed In The Liver Are Exported To Other Organs

Ketone Bodies In human beings and most other mammals, acetyl-CoA formed in the liver during oxidation of fatty acids may enter the citric acid cycle (stage 2 of Fig. 16-7) or it may be converted to the "ketone bodies" acetoacetate, D-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone for export to other tissues. (The term "bodies" is a historical artifact; these compounds are soluble in blood and urine.) Acetone, produced in smaller quantities than the other ketone bodies, is exhaled. Acetoacetate and D-β-hydroxybutyrate are transported by the blood to the extrahepatic tissues, where they are oxidized via the citric acid cycle to provide much of the energy required by tissues such as skeletal and heart muscle and the renal cortex. The brain, which normally prefers glucose as a fuel, can adapt to the use of acetoacetate or D-β-hydroxybutyrate under starvation conditions, when glucose is unavailable. A major determinant of the pathway taken by acetyl-CoA in liver mitochondria is the availability of oxaloacetate to initiate entry of acetyl-CoA into the citric acid cycle. Under some circumstances (such as starvation) oxaloacetate is drawn out of the citric acid cycle for use in synthesizing glucose. Wh Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. * DKA explanation

    * DKA explanation

    Below you will find a terrific explanation of DKA from one of the instructors at Med School Tutors. If you like what you see and may be interested in learning more about one-on-one instruction from MST, then please visit their website at www.medschooltutors.com
    In order to understand how to treat DKA, it is useful to first understand what is going on in the body when DKA develops. First of all, DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) typically develops when a Type I diabetic does not take his or her insulin for a prolonged period of time. It may also be the presentation for new onset diabetes. Because these patients are insulin deficient, they are not able to take up glucose into their cells. This results in two important consequences: 1)glucose builds up in the blood and causes hyperglycemia and 2)the body's cells are forced to breakdown fat for energy, instead of glucose.
    These are very significant consequences... The hyperglycemia results in an osmotic diuresis, because the proximal tubule of the kidney can't reabsorb all the glucose filtered into the nephron. What is osmotic diuresis? Simply that the hyperglycemia (usually >300) causes the body to excrete lots and lots of water, because the osmotic pull of all the glucose particles prevents the reabsorbtion of water in the collecting duct. This means that patients with DKA are peeing their brains out!! They pee out sodium, potassium, and water.. And are therefore, very very very DEHYDRATED, sodium depleted, and potassium depleted.
    Now for the metabolism end of things... The body cells are forced to metabolize fat for energy rather than glucose. How do they accomplish this? - beta-oxidation of fatty acids. This results in excess production of ketone bodies which deplete available acid buffers. This causes a significant metabolic acidosis, with a high anion gap due to the presence of ketoacids. The acidosis causes potassium to shift from the intracellular space to the extracellular space. This may result in a normal or high serum potassium level. This normal or high potassium level masks what is typically significant potassium depletion because the person was peeing all their potassium out as a result of the uncontrolled hyperglycemia.
    So what are we going to do now? I will give a very brief answer for now, expect people to ask questions in the meantime, and then provide a more thorough approach to treatment in the coming days.
    1)Give the patient tons of normal saline. Why? - because your patient is dehydrated as all hell. They have been peeing out every last drop of water because of their severe uncontrolled hyperglycemia. These patients require liters of fluid to replenish all the fluid they've lost as a result of the osmotic diuresis.
    2)Give them insulin. Why? - NOT because it will lower the blood glucose level, but because it will cause a shift away from fat metabolism and toward glucose metabolism. This will slow the production of ketone bodies which are precipitating the metabolic acidosis. Thus, I will repeat, we give insulin to shift away from fat metabolism and stop the production of ketone bodies.
    3)Give the patient potassium. Why? - As we discussed earlier, the person has been peeing out all of their potassium stores and are overall very potassium depleted, despite having normal or high serum potassium levels to begin with. In addition to being potassium depleted, the insulin you are giving will cause a shift of potassium from the extracellular space to the intracellular space, which will drop the serum potassium. Thus, we give DKA patients potassium way before they become hypokalemic.
    4)Give the patient dextrose. Why? - They insulin you are giving the patient is obviously going to cause the serum glucose to decrease. We give glucose to prevent hypoglycemia as we continue to give insulin.
    How do we know when we are finished treating these patients? - When the anion gap returns to normal.
    That's all for now. Please ask any questions you have. I will be giving more specifics about DKA management in the near future.
    PS: Does anyone know the dangerous consequence of giving DKA patients fluid too rapidly? What are the symptoms this may cause, and what is the pathophysiology behind these symptoms?

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

A 12 year old boy, previously healthy, is admitted to the hospital after 2 days of polyuria, polyphagia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Vital signs are: Temp 37C, BP 103/63 mmHg, HR 112, RR 30. Physical exam shows a lethargic boy. Labs are notable forWBC 16,000,Glucose 534, K 5.9, pH 7.13, PCO2 is 20 mmHg, PO2 is 90 mmHg. result of insulin, glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine increased tidal volume and rate as a result of metabolic acidosis due to gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis tissues unable to use the high glucose as it is unable to enter cells anion gap due to ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis consumed in an attempt to buffer the increased acid glucose acts as an osmotic agent and draws water from ICF to ECF acidosis results in ICF/ECF exchange of H+ for K+ depletion of total body potassium due to cellular shift and losses through urine -hydroxybutyrate not detected with normal ketone body tests due to in capillary lipoprotein lipase activity H2PO4- is increased in urine, as it is titratable acid used to buffer the excess H+ that is being excreted must prevent resultant hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia labs may show pseudo-hyperkalemia prior to administartion of fluid Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. * DKA explanation

    * DKA explanation

    Below you will find a terrific explanation of DKA from one of the instructors at Med School Tutors. If you like what you see and may be interested in learning more about one-on-one instruction from MST, then please visit their website at www.medschooltutors.com
    In order to understand how to treat DKA, it is useful to first understand what is going on in the body when DKA develops. First of all, DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) typically develops when a Type I diabetic does not take his or her insulin for a prolonged period of time. It may also be the presentation for new onset diabetes. Because these patients are insulin deficient, they are not able to take up glucose into their cells. This results in two important consequences: 1)glucose builds up in the blood and causes hyperglycemia and 2)the body's cells are forced to breakdown fat for energy, instead of glucose.
    These are very significant consequences... The hyperglycemia results in an osmotic diuresis, because the proximal tubule of the kidney can't reabsorb all the glucose filtered into the nephron. What is osmotic diuresis? Simply that the hyperglycemia (usually >300) causes the body to excrete lots and lots of water, because the osmotic pull of all the glucose particles prevents the reabsorbtion of water in the collecting duct. This means that patients with DKA are peeing their brains out!! They pee out sodium, potassium, and water.. And are therefore, very very very DEHYDRATED, sodium depleted, and potassium depleted.
    Now for the metabolism end of things... The body cells are forced to metabolize fat for energy rather than glucose. How do they accomplish this? - beta-oxidation of fatty acids. This results in excess production of ketone bodies which deplete available acid buffers. This causes a significant metabolic acidosis, with a high anion gap due to the presence of ketoacids. The acidosis causes potassium to shift from the intracellular space to the extracellular space. This may result in a normal or high serum potassium level. This normal or high potassium level masks what is typically significant potassium depletion because the person was peeing all their potassium out as a result of the uncontrolled hyperglycemia.
    So what are we going to do now? I will give a very brief answer for now, expect people to ask questions in the meantime, and then provide a more thorough approach to treatment in the coming days.
    1)Give the patient tons of normal saline. Why? - because your patient is dehydrated as all hell. They have been peeing out every last drop of water because of their severe uncontrolled hyperglycemia. These patients require liters of fluid to replenish all the fluid they've lost as a result of the osmotic diuresis.
    2)Give them insulin. Why? - NOT because it will lower the blood glucose level, but because it will cause a shift away from fat metabolism and toward glucose metabolism. This will slow the production of ketone bodies which are precipitating the metabolic acidosis. Thus, I will repeat, we give insulin to shift away from fat metabolism and stop the production of ketone bodies.
    3)Give the patient potassium. Why? - As we discussed earlier, the person has been peeing out all of their potassium stores and are overall very potassium depleted, despite having normal or high serum potassium levels to begin with. In addition to being potassium depleted, the insulin you are giving will cause a shift of potassium from the extracellular space to the intracellular space, which will drop the serum potassium. Thus, we give DKA patients potassium way before they become hypokalemic.
    4)Give the patient dextrose. Why? - They insulin you are giving the patient is obviously going to cause the serum glucose to decrease. We give glucose to prevent hypoglycemia as we continue to give insulin.
    How do we know when we are finished treating these patients? - When the anion gap returns to normal.
    That's all for now. Please ask any questions you have. I will be giving more specifics about DKA management in the near future.
    PS: Does anyone know the dangerous consequence of giving DKA patients fluid too rapidly? What are the symptoms this may cause, and what is the pathophysiology behind these symptoms?

  2. -> Continue reading
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Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference pap Continue reading >>

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  1. Knicks

    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment.

  2. generic

    The HCO3 derangement is not a compensation--it is the primary problem.
    DKA patients have a metabolic acidosis, I think it's mostly caused by the formation of tons and tons of ketone bodies (acidic). These are formed because despite high circulating levels of glucose, the cells can't use the glucose without insulin-->turn to ketone formation instead.
    The metabolic acidosis may cause respiratory compensation, which would give Kussmaul breathing, for example.

  3. treva

    Knicks said: ↑
    In DKA, the patient is acidotic, right? So why would the body decrease bicarbonate (a base)? Wouldn't you want to keep the bicarbonate high so as to neutralize the acid?
    Too tired to think straight at the moment. Remember the kidney takes days to compensate for acidodic state by producing more bicarb. Acutely, the bicarb is used to buffer the extra acid, so it drops.
    This also explains why DKA pts have increased RR:
    CO2 + H20 <--> H2CO3 <--> HCO3- + H+
    If you blow off extra CO2 (ie by upping RR) you shift the above equation to the left, and promote the formation of H2CO3 via CA, helping to mop up the H+.

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