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Why Are Doctors No Longer Prescribing Metformin

Why Good Doctors No Longer Prescribe Metformin

Why Good Doctors No Longer Prescribe Metformin

Until recently, diabetics looking for doctor-approved, drug-free treatment options were out of luck. But a growing number of health experts believe those days are behind us. Dr. Marlene Merritt (LAc, DOM(NM), MS Nutrition), an Austin-based doctor who used to suffer high blood sugar herself, made a recent announcement that is sending shockwaves through the medical community. Dr. Merritt knew all too well that commonly-prescribed diabetes drugs like Metformin came with a host of unwanted side effects, and was determined to find a natural, drug-free solution that could actually eliminate the disease, not just treat its symptoms. After months of research, Dr. Merritt developed a simple diet and exercise regimen that had a profound success rate in treating and even reversing type II diabetes. Despite the regimen’s clear effectiveness, medical journals were slow to publish her findings, perhaps due in part, some have speculated, to financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry. In response, Dr. Merritt took matters in to her own hands and shocked the medical community by partnering with independent health publisher Primal Health to make her diabetes-reversing regimen available to everyone in the form of an online presentation. Several viewers have noted the simplicity of the regimen, along with how non-restrictive the diet sounds. Unsurprisingly, many in the pharmaceutical industry have taken issue with the presentation’s drug-free emphasis, but many doctors who have wished for a natural, drug-free treatment to share with their diabetic patients have been quick to embrace it. Dr. Merritt herself cautions viewers to exercise common sense and only go off your medication with the approval of your doctor. Never underestimate the influence you have on those around you. Your wo Continue reading >>

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin For Diabetes

Information about this medicine What are the most important things you need to know about your medicines? Make sure you know about each of the medicines you take. This includes why you take it, how to take it, what you can expect while you're taking it, and any warnings about the medicine. The information provided here is general. So be sure to read the information that came with your medicine. If you have any questions or concerns, talk to your pharmacist or doctor. Why is metformin used? Metformin is a medicine used to treat prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. It helps control your blood sugar. It is also used to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome. Metformin works very well and is generally safe. What are some examples of metformin? Here are some examples of metformin. For each item in the list, the generic name is first, followed by any brand names. metformin (Glucophage) long-acting metformin (Glumetza) Sometimes metformin is combined with other diabetes medicine. Avandamet is a combination of metformin and rosiglitazone. Janumet is a combination of metformin and sitagliptin. Jentadueto is a combination of metformin and linagliptin. This is not a complete list. What about side effects? When they first start taking metformin or start taking a larger dose, some people feel sick to their stomach or have diarrhea for a short time. Over time, blood levels of vitamin B12 can decrease in some people who take metformin. Your body needs this B vitamin to make blood cells and to keep your nervous system healthy. If you have been taking metformin for more than a few years, ask your doctor if you need a B12 blood test to measure the amount of vitamin B12 in your blood. General information on side effects All medicines can cause side effects. Many people don't Continue reading >>

Usf Study: Inexpensive Drug Could Cut Type 2 Diabetes Cases By 30 Percent

Usf Study: Inexpensive Drug Could Cut Type 2 Diabetes Cases By 30 Percent

According to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes – many of them the Type 2 form of the disease. That's where the body doesn't produce enough insulin on its own. But another 86 million adults have prediabetes, with up to a third at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes within five years. Now while experts say a change in lifestyle, with a healthier diet and more exercise, would cut that number down, so could an inexpensive, generic prescription drug called metformin - a drug that is currently being used by only 0.7 percent of patients with prediabetes. Dr. Nicholas Carris, an assistant professor at the University of South Florida College of Pharmacy, recently co-authored a study looking at the cost-effectiveness of the drug in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association. (Note: You must be a member to view the full study. Disclosure: Carris and his fellow authors have no conflicts of interest or financial interests in metformin or any other product or service mentioned in the article.) Carris recently sat down with WUSF's University Beat to discuss the findings of the study. Here are some highlights: What does metformin do? "Metformin is our first-line medication actually to treat Type 2 diabetes and it's been studied also to prevent diabetes. It's a generic medication, it helps lower blood sugar. "For people with prediabetes, it can also help them lose weight -- just a little bit -- and that was found out in the Diabetes Prevention Program research study, which is what my study is based off of, and so in that study, after a little less than three years, metformin reduced patients' risk for developing Type 2 diabetes by a little over 30 percent." How cost-effective i Continue reading >>

Do You Have A Good Doctor?

Do You Have A Good Doctor?

There is one often overlooked factor that can save you or someone you love from a future filled with amputations, failing vision, and dialysis: a family doctor who keeps up-to-date on diabetes treatment. Not all doctors do. In fact, quite a few doctors out there got their training in diabetes care in medical school decades ago, and the only "diabetes education" they've gotten since then has been provided by the drug companies. Drug company "education" is nothing more than promotion for whatever is the newest, most expensive drug available for treating diabetes--with the side effects unmentioned or dismissed as insignificant. Even those doctors who do attempt to keep up with the latest in diabetes treatments may do so by reading newsletters that summarize the most publicized recent research findings. But these, too, focus almost entirely on new drugs and often just summarize drug company press releases. That is why a major part of your diabetes self-care should include finding a doctor who will become a partner, not an obstacle, in your quest for normal health. While this whole site contains a lot of information that can help you assess the quality of the treatment you are getting what I've done here is put together a list of questions you can use to evaluate the care you are getting from the medical professionals you are paying for your care. Does your doctor support you in your desire to attain normal blood sugars? A major warning sign that a doctor's knowledge of diabetes is out of date is the doctor who dismisses your concern about an abnormal blood sugar test because it isn't, in his mind, abnormal enough. If your fasting blood sugar is over 110 mg/dl, or your post meal blood sugars are routinely going over 140 mg/dl at 2 hours, and your doctor tells you that this i Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Alternative To Metformin – Why Doctors In The Know No Longer Prescribe Metformin

Alternative To Metformin – Why Doctors In The Know No Longer Prescribe Metformin

Alternative to Metformin – Side Effects of Metformin? Urgent news about Metformin – #1 Lie About Diabetes Meds Metformin Side Effects – Alternative to Metformin, Until recently, diabetics looking for doctor-approved, drug-free treatment options were out of luck. Type II Diabetes sufferers may soon be tossing their test strips, lancet needles, and prescription pills as you now have top rate Alternative to Metformin. But a growing number of health experts believe those days are behind us. A discovery by an Austin-based doctor may change how Type II Diabetes is treated and could even be a cure. Dr. Marlene Merritt suffered from high blood sugar for years and was determined to find a natural solution. “My motivation,” she says, “was to cast off the shackles of the daily monitoring, the shots and pills, and the drug side effects. I wanted to live a normal life again.” After two years of research and trial and error experiments, Dr. Marlene Merritt hit upon a practical diet and exercise regimen that doesn’t just control Type II Diabetes but actually reverses it. While the regimen eliminates a few foods, it most importantly adds a single food that has shown to have a big impact on the disease. The announcement of her discovery has sent shockwaves through the medical community, with some progressive doctors enthusiastically embracing it, and many conventional doctors taking a “wait and see” approach. Within weeks of adopting her own regimen, Dr. Merritt’s condition completely reversed. “It was just gone, and I had my life back,” she says. I then prescribed this drug-free solution to my diabetic patients and, in most cases, they too saw success in a matter of weeks.” Dr. Marlene Merritt (LAc, DOM(NM), MS Nutrition), an Austin-based doctor who used to Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin

Glyburide And Metformin

Pronunciation: GLYE bure ide and met FOR min Brand: Glucovance Glucovance 1.25 mg-250 mg What is the most important information I should know about glyburide and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glyburide and metformin. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is glyburide and metformin? Glyburide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glyburide and metformin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glyburide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking glyburide and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to glyburide or metformin, or: if you have severe kidney disease; if you are also using bosentan (to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension); or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glyburide and metformin. Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely Continue reading >>

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Revises Warnings Regarding Use Of The Diabetes Medicine Metformin In Certain Patients With Reduced Kidney Function

Fda Drug Safety Communication: Fda Revises Warnings Regarding Use Of The Diabetes Medicine Metformin In Certain Patients With Reduced Kidney Function

[ 4-8-2016 ] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring labeling changes regarding the recommendations for metformin-containing medicines for diabetes to expand metformin’s use in certain patients with reduced kidney function. The current labeling strongly recommends against use of metformin in some patients whose kidneys do not work normally. We were asked1,2 to review numerous medical studies regarding the safety of metformin use in patients with mild to moderate impairment in kidney function,3-14 and to change the measure of kidney function in the metformin drug labeling that is used to determine whether a patient can receive metformin. We have concluded our review, and are requiring changes to the labeling of all metformin-containing medicines to reflect this new information. Health care professionals should follow the latest recommendations when prescribing metformin-containing medicines to patients with impaired kidney function. Patients should talk to their health care professionals if they have any questions or concerns about taking metformin. Metformin-containing medicines are available by prescription only and are used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. When untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious problems, including blindness, nerve and kidney damage, and heart disease. Metformin-containing medicines are available as single-ingredient products and also in combination with other drugs used to treat diabetes (see FDA Approved metformin-containing Medicines). The current drug labeling strongly recommends against metformin use in some patients whose kidneys do not work normally because use of metformin in these patients can increase the risk of developing a serious and potentially dead Continue reading >>

How Metformin Is Used For Fertility

How Metformin Is Used For Fertility

Metformin is an insulin-sensitizing drug primarily used to treat diabetes, but it can also be used for fertility. Women with PCOS may benefit from taking metformin alone, along with Clomid, or even during IVF treatment. Exactly how metformin improves fertility is unclear. While metformin may be used for the treatment of infertility, it is not a fertility drug. In fact, using it to treat infertility is considered an off-label use. (In other words, pregnancy achievement is not the original intended purpose of this drug.) What is this medication? And how might it help you conceive? What Is Metformin? To understand what metformin does, you first need to know what insulin resistance is. Many women with PCOS have insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is when the body's cells stop reacting to normal levels of insulin. They become less sensitive, or resistant. As a result, the body thinks that there is not enough insulin in the system. This triggers the production of more insulin than your body needs. There seems to be a connection between insulin and the reproductive hormones. While no one is quite sure exactly how the two connect, insulin levels seem to lead to increased levels of androgens. Men and women have androgens, but androgens are typically thought of as "male hormones." High androgen levels lead to PCOS symptoms and problems with ovulation. Metformin and other insulin-sensitizing medications lower excess levels of insulin in the body. Besides metformin, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are other insulin-sensitizing drugs that may be used to treat PCOS. Why Is Metformin Used to Treat PCOS? There are several reasons why your doctor may prescribe metformin when treating your PCOS, some of them fertility related: Insulin Resistance As stated above, insulin resistance is c Continue reading >>

Should Physicians Prescribe Metformin To Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Pcos?

Should Physicians Prescribe Metformin To Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Pcos?

Abstract 1. Metformin is not efficient enough in order to regulate menstrual cycles. 2.Metformin is not efficient enough in order to treat hyperandrogenism. 3. Metformin should not be used as a first-line treatment in order to treat infertility. Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the reference treatment. 4. Metformin in addition to CC is not recommended as a second line treatment, after the failure of CC alone. 5. Metformin should not be used during pregnancy in non diabetic women with PCOS, in order to prevent the risk of gestational diabetes. 6. Metformin should be prescribed to PCOS women when they are diabetic, in order to prevent their cardiovascular risk, after lifestyle modification. 7. Metformin should not be used in PCOS non diabetic women in order to lose weight. Metformin should not be used in order to treat dyslipidemia in women with PCOS. 8. In PCOS women, without diabetes, but with fasting hyperglycemia or carbohydrate intolerance, metformin should be prescribed if: BMI>35. Continue reading >>

The Pros And Cons Of Metformin For Diabetes

The Pros And Cons Of Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin is #7 on the doctors’ hit parade of top 10 prescription drugs. Each year the number of prescriptions increases substantially. Last year there were 87 million metformin prescriptions dispensed in U.S. pharmacies. That does not count combo products that include metformin in their formulation such as Glucovance, Invokamet, Janumet, Kombiglyze XR, Metaglip and Synjardy, to name just a few. Metformin is clearly the #1 drug for diabetes and because the number of people with diabetes keeps going up, prescriptions for metformin are skyrocketing. That’s why readers of our syndicated newspaper column and visitors to this website are so desperate to learn more about metformin for diabetes. How To Know If Metformin for Diabetes Is Right for You: Here is a typical letter from a reader: Q. I crossed the line a month ago from normal blood sugar to type 2 diabetes and was put on metformin. I hate taking drugs. What can you tell me about metformin? Thank the Old Wives: A. Metformin is one of the oldest and most well-studied diabetes medicines. It probably comes as a shock to most prescribers to learn that their favorite diabetes drug is available thanks to the old wives. Practitioners of folk medicine discovered that French lilac (Galega officinalis) helped control the symptoms of a condition associated with “sweet urine.” An article in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (Oct. 15, 2001) noted: “In medieval times, a prescription of Galega officinalis was said to relieve the intense urination accompanying the disease that came to have the name of diabetes mellitus [now known as type 2 diabetes].” The botanist and physician Nicholas Culpeper detailed the health benefits of French lilac in 1656. He described the ability of the plant to lower blood sugar and control Continue reading >>

My Diabetes Dr. Refused To Issue My Diabetes Prescriptions

My Diabetes Dr. Refused To Issue My Diabetes Prescriptions

I was diagnosed as a Diabetic several years ago. I presented with acute Pancreatitis and a blood sugar of 565. Normal for a non-diabetic is 80, and for a Diabetic normal is 100. I spent 5 days in the hospital and the doctor in question was undoubtedly one of the team who saved my life, while also being a part of the hospital and team that just about bankrupted me. Turns out that having grandparents on both sides with Diabetes, a mother with who is hypoglycemic, and a father with Diabetes put a giant target on my front. The years have passed with, thankfully, no more hospital visits, as I have been a "good" diabetic. I've kept very good track of my blood sugar, and I've presented myself to my Endocrinologist regularly for AC-1 tests, among others. AC-1 is a test which measures how much glucose is sticking to your red blood cells. It is a measure of how well you've done over the past 2 or 3 months, as blood glucose sticks to the red blood cells and stays there until the cell dies, which can take a few weeks. I've adjusted my diet, my way of cooking. I never snack, except on things guaranteed not to raise my blood-sugar much. After paying off the hospital and doctor bills, which totaled somewhere around $10,000.00 (yes, I do have insurance), we had no savings whatsoever. Enter the failing economy. The routine doctor's visits have been an additional expense to the $700.00 monthly crap insurance policy in addition to the several hundred dollars worth of diabetic drugs and supplies I must purchase each month. I've had to take my time paying them, though the insurance brings an average visit with just one or two tests to about $140.00. Creeping up slowly...the failing economy. I closed my business, which was providing some cash flow, but was costing more all the time. People j Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drugs: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Drugs: What You Need To Know

Have you ever heard of a diabetic getting healthier once he or she started taking metformin (Glucophage) or some other diabetic drug? Of course not! Gee, I wonder why .. Unfortunately, most diabetics are prescribed a diabetic drug such as metformin (Glucophage) by their doctors once they have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. This drug (and other diabetes drugs) helps to lower your blood glucose back to the normal range. So it appears that the drug is working. Right? It depends on what you mean by "working". It addresses one of the primary symptoms of diabetes -- high blood glucose levels -- by lowering your blood glucose, hopefully back to the normal range. However, the drug doesn't do anything to actually stop the progression of the diabetes. But, because it lowers your blood glucose, it gives you the false sense of security that the drug is actually helping with your diabetes. Sure, in the short term, the drug does help a little bit, because it helps to lower your blood sugar. But, the doctor fails to tell you that the drug does absolutely nothing to stop the spread of the cell and tissue damage being caused by the diabetes! In fact, over a period of years, the drug may actually cause damage to the liver and kidneys! If you have an adverse reaction* to the drug (such as an upset stomach or diarrhea), your doctor will not tell you why this is happening -- instead, he/she will just put you on a different drug such as glimepiride (Amaryl) or glipizide (Glucotrol). *p.s. The reason why you have an adverse reaction is because your body is smart enough to know that something is wrong. Your body reacts negatively to most toxins by sending you a signal (upset stomach, diarrhea) letting you know that something is wrong. So, be careful, not to jump at taking this drug or an Continue reading >>

Here’s Why Doctors Have Stopped Prescribing Metformin

Here’s Why Doctors Have Stopped Prescribing Metformin

We are quickly approaching the day when people diagnosed with Type II Diabetes can kiss goodbye to their expensive pills and annoying needles and test strips. This is thanks to a breakthrough from a Sri Lankan researcher, a specialist in endocrinology with 23 years’ experience, that is going to change everything we thought we knew about how to treat Type II Diabetes... No more needles! Would you be willing to try a "Delicious Dish"or even a "Miracle Smoothie" that could solve the problem of diabetes naturally? Mr. Michel Dempsey, in a brave (and lucky) attempt to save his wife from diabetes discovered a Sri Lankan tribe that has 0 cases of diabetes or pre diabetes. Against all odds he was able, with the help of a Sri Lankan researcher from the university of Peradeniya, to develop a natural treatment to reverse diabetes using the exact same ingredients the tribe has been consuming for decades. He said that he just couldn't see the mother of his 3 children unable to cast off the shackles of diabetes. He wanted to find a better future for her. Now, several years of research, study and experiments later, Chaminda, the Sri Lankan researcher, has discovered a surprisingly simple way to stop diabetes and even reverse it, giving you back the life you had before. The method involves doing away with the foods that are making the problem worse, and replacing them with ingredients and superfood that has doctors baffled. This new method was met with harsh criticism from the medical community and pharmaceutical companies, but he was never criticised by those who actually try it; most of them experienced success in just a few weeks. Michel says that this method has proven results, and these results can speak for themselves. By now you’re probably wondering why you’ve never heard Continue reading >>

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