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Why Am I Not In Ketosis In The Morning

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Implications Of The Circadian Nature Of Ketones.

Implications Of The Circadian Nature Of Ketones.

Ketosis. Happens during starvation and also by restricting carbohydrates (and protein, to a lesser degree)… might be important for epilepsy and bipolar disorder, too. Ketostix measure urinary acetoacetate (AcAc) and reflect the degree of ketosis in the blood probably about 2-4 hours ago. Blood ketone meters measure beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) right now. bHB fluctuates to a greater degree, eg, it plummets after a meal whereas AcAc takes longer to decline. AcAc/bHB is usually around 1, but increases after a meal (Mori et al., 1990): Conversely, when glucose levels decline and fatty acid oxidation increases, liver redox potential drops which reduces AcAc/bHB. Galvin et al., 1968 Ketogenic diet-induced ketosis: 90% fat diet for 9 days. Ketones ~0.3-9.4 mM. Starvation-exercise ketosis: 36 h fast, then 2.5 h walk. 0.7-6.9 mM. Exercise-induced ketosis: same as above, sans starvation. 0.2-1.7 mM Whether it is Jane Plain’s pee, or Jimmy & Freda’s blood, ketosis register strongest at night. Why? It’s not measurement error. From Cameron (2012): Urinary acidity increases in the evening, which should favor false negatives on the ketostix. Urine is more dilute in the evenings which also favors lower ketone readings… but this doesn’t happen; confirmed by blood testing. It occurs in dairy cows, too (Nielsen et al., 2003): And in rats fed a ketogenic diet: bHB is elevated after they’ve been eating all night; similar to humans who have been eating keto all day (closed squares, solid line) (De Gasquet 1977): PM ketones are likely higher because of the convergence of a few “normal” biological events. 1) Adipose-derived FFAs are not as robust of a delivery mechanism as keto-buffet in stimulating ketogenesis. 2) Exercise is a known ketogenic stimulus. Daily activity is a wea Continue reading >>

Keto-adapted, But No Ketones?

Keto-adapted, But No Ketones?

One of the cheapest and easiest ways to measure ketones is to use ketone test strips, e.g. Ketostix. Ketone test strips use a chemical reaction to measure acetoacetate (see below), usually in urine, though the same method can be used for blood. (Not to be confused with the blood strips used at home for beta-hydroxybutyrate.) However, acetoacetate test strips are of limited usefulness. For one thing, urine concentrations are affected by dilution, which means that they are affected by how much you drink. But the problem is deeper than that. Acetoacetate is only one of the three ketone bodies (see below). Initially, when you start a ketogenic diet, acetoacetate will make up about half of the circulating ketones [1], but when you are keto-adapted, it makes up only about 20% of the ketone bodies in circulation (see below). Morover, the sensitivity of the strips is a little lower than optimal for our purposes. They register negative unless the concentration is quite high. So, it is not uncommon for a keto-adapted person to measure negative for acetoacetate. Different ketone bodies occur in different amounts There are three compounds grouped together as ketone bodies: acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone. In keto-adapted people, acetoacetate levels are relatively low even though beta-hydroxybutyrate is high. Typically, beta-hydroxybutyrate levels are 4–5 times as high as acetoacetate. (Acetone makes up only about 2% of total ketone bodies [2].) The graph above shows that in the ketosis of fasting, the proportion of acetoacetate (the top, white part of the bar) is much smaller than that of beta-hydroxybutyrate (the black part). In the study here, after 21 days of fasting, the average level of blood acetoacetate was 1.04 mmol/L, while the beta-hydroxybutyrate level Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

A Ketogenic Diet For Breakfast

A Ketogenic Diet For Breakfast

Mike Samuels started writing for his own fitness website and local publications in 2008. He graduated from Peter Symonds College in the UK with A Levels in law, business and sports science, and is a fully qualified personal trainer, sports massage therapist and corrective exercise specialist with accreditations from Premier Global International. Eggs are a good base for a keto breakfast.Photo Credit: TeodoraDjordjevic/iStock/Getty Images A ketogenic diet is one which is high in fat, contains a moderate amount of protein and is very low in carbohydrates. When on a ketogenic diet, your body goes into ketosis and switches to burning fat for fuel, rather than carbohydrate. This diet was originally designed as a treatment for the symptoms of childhood epilepsy, but has also made its way into the world of weight loss dieting. Whether you're following a full ketogenic plan, or just looking for low-carbohydrate meals, you have plenty of options at breakfast time. Eggs can be a staple breakfast item in any ketogenic dieter's breakfast, according to the Atkins website. They can be served any way -- boiled, poached, fried or scrambled -- or make an omelet using low-carb vegetables like asparagus and mushrooms. For eggs you can make in advance, try making a low-carb quiche using a basic recipe of eggs, heavy cream, onion, a little butter and cheese, plus seasoning. You can then vary the flavor by adding more vegetables, different cheeses or meat. If you can't eat eggs, don't enjoy them, or simply fancy a change, you do have alternative options. The Diabetes Life website recommends two sausage patties with two thick slices of tomato and two tablespoons of cottage cheese, which comes in at just 3 grams of carbs. Alternatively, try a steak melt, made with five thin strips of leftover Continue reading >>

9 Reasons Why You Aren’t In A State Of Ketosis

9 Reasons Why You Aren’t In A State Of Ketosis

If you’re having trouble getting into ketosis, it is useful to understand the factors that actually impact blood ketone levels. When I first started on the ketogenic diet, I made sure to educate myself fully on how I can efficiently get into a fat-adapted state (ketosis). Just like everything else, there’s going to be some hurdles you’ll face when adopting a keto lifestyle. Watch out for these 8 ketogenic pitfalls you could be potentially be falling for. 1. Carbohydrates Pretty much all steps involved in producing ketones are inhibited by insulin, this means that ketone levels are extremely sensitive to carb intake. There isn’t an exact amount of carbohydrates that works for everyone to get into ketosis. But, there is a general guideline that works for most people. It has been estimated that around 50 grams per day or lower of carbohydrates will elevate your blood ketone levels. You should be eating less than 30 grams in order to get into ketosis. From personal experience, I found that if i’m more active on any given day, I can get away with eating more carbohydrates and still have decent blood ketone levels. I actually have been able to get away with upwards of 100 grams of carbs and still be in ketosis. I believe this is because when you are active, you are burning extra glycogen storages that come from carbohydrates. 2. Protein. Just like carbohydrates, increasing your intake of protein to fat in your diet will limit your ketone production. The reason behind this is because over half of amino acids in proteins are converted into glucose in the body, thus, producing an anti-keto effect. This is not as big of a deal for athletes / people who are very active because the body is utilizing the protein and amino acids to the point where it is not hindering your k Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

Dawn Phenomenon

Dawn Phenomenon

The dawn phenomenon (DP) is a term which describes an unexplained rise in blood sugar levels between 5-9 am, usually due to a previous night time rise of growth hormone which stimulates the liver to break down glycogen and release glucose into the blood stream. The term was coined in a 1981 paper by Schmidt et al. In a paper published in Endocrine Practice, the authors defined this increase in blood sugar in the early morning hours by writing: "To be clinically relevant, the magnitude of the dawn increase in blood glucose level should be more than 10 mg/dL or the increase in insulin requirement should be at least 20% from the overnight nadir...Approximately 54% of patients with type 1 diabetes and 55% of patients with type 2 diabetes experience the phenomenon when the foregoing quantitative definition is used." In more simple terms, fasting blood sugars in the morning are more elevated than would be expected given food and activity levels. Normally, elevated blood sugar is the result of eating carbohydrates or too much protein. However, the overnight blood sugar increase in DP is not associated with food consumption. For example, a person with diabetes might have average blood sugars around 110 at bedtime, but upon awakening, fasting blood sugar may be 120 -130, even though they didn't eat all through the night and sleep was normal. It starts with a process called gluconeogenesis in the liver. Some researchers believe that a release of other hormones such as cortisol during the night may be involved. DP may also involve a weakening of the action of insulin between 2 AM and 8 AM, and it can result in very high blood sugars after breakfast, especially if carbohydrates are consumed at this meal. (See this paper.) The actual mechanism involved is not well understood. In som Continue reading >>

Why Am I Still Hungry On A Ketogenic Diet? - Sweet Geek

Why Am I Still Hungry On A Ketogenic Diet? - Sweet Geek

Why Am I Still Hungry on a Ketogenic Diet? One of the first things I hear from others about their experience with a ketogenic diet is usually that they arent hungry. Suddenly many are able to cut out snacks entirely or even eat just 1-2 meals a day. It saddened and drove me crazy that I was NOT one of these lucky people! Well I think I may have finally figured out why I was still hungry even on a ketogenic diet! Before I share, Id like to start from the beginning. Over Christmas, I decided to eat some desserts that contained gluten. Well one meal turned into a few more you know how it goes and by New Years, my digestive system was seriously pissed at me. I was in a ton of pain and things were not working right in the poop department. :) So I decided to give my guts a break. My husband had recently brought home a protein powder that tasted very good so quite arbitrarily I started a protein shake reset. The first day I had 2 shakes, each shake is 12g carb / 27g protein / 52g fat, about 600 calories. I was hungry and cranky in between meals but I was ready to do whatever it took to get my digestion back in working order. The second day, I had my first shake in the morning and then lunch rolled past and I WASNT HUNGRY! By the third day it finally sunk in that something about my silly reset had completely nuked my constant gnawing hunger, cravings and thoughts of food. I was eating 2-3 shakes a day with maybe a small snack of bacon or some faux chocolate mousse . In total it has been between 1,400 1,700 calories a day. Which is a huge reduction from what I have been doing lately, which has been around 2,200 (all the while still hungry I might add!). This was absolutely NOT originally a diet attempt. I was simply suddenly not hungry and this just happened to be how much I fe Continue reading >>

What To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

What To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet, described as “Atkins on steroids” for its focus on foods high in fat and protein and low in carbohydrates, is growing in popularity but some nutritionists warn it may not live up to the hype. The diet’s proponents say that it is the best way to lose weight without feeling hungry and that it increases energy levels. Celebrities including Kim Kardashian and Adriana Lima and athletes from LeBron James to Tim Tebow have all reportedly followed some form of low carb diets. “Absolutely this diet works,” New York-based registered dietitian nutritionist Maya Feller told ABC News. “It is going to give people weight loss.” The ketogenic, keto for short, diet was developed in the 1920s after it was noticed that after fasting, epileptics would experience a marked reduction in their seizures. The diet is designed to get your body into a state called ketosis where your body is so low on carbohydrates it starts burning fat for fuel. Ketosis is also what the body does when fasting. Keto dieters drastically cut carbohydrates to about 10 percent of their daily diet, which in some cases can be just 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. That amount of carbohydrates is equivalent to one slice of white bread per day, according to Feller. Nutritionists also stress that followers of a keto diet should get their fat intake from healthy fats like olive oils and nuts. Samantha Kafedzic, 31, has lost 17 pounds since starting on a keto diet four weeks ago. Kafedzic, who admits she now eats “very different” meals from her daughter, said she feels better overall in addition to the weight loss. “I have more energy with this one running around,” Kafedzic said, pointing to her daughter. “My workouts are so much better. I definitely have more stamina.” The key t Continue reading >>

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

The problem with diets is that we think that one diet should be good for everyone. But research and N=1 experiments show that’s not the case. Learn about measuring ketones and ketosis to understand how your low carb or high fat diet is really affecting you. If there is one area of our bodies that is debated to extremes, with literally hundreds of differing strong opinions on it, it’s nutrition. For many, beliefs about nutrition and diet are tribal. We put ourselves in different camps and we war agains the other camps. Whether it be paleo, low fat, low carb, Atkins, high fat, low protein, vegan, raw vegan and so on. It’s exactly this sort of area where I see data as essential. Without data we have no hope of cutting through the maze of opinions to get to what really works. Part of the problem with nutrition and diets is that we tend to think that one diet should be good for everyone. But increasingly, research and N=1 experiments, are showing that that isn’t the case. And this is exactly why you should pay attention to today’s show. Today, we’re looking at what has relatively recently become the fastest growing nutrition or diet trend. The high fat diet. Also known in different guises as the ketogenic diet, or the low carb diet. And specifically how this can affect our different individual biochemistries, how we can measure “Ketosis” and other biomarkers to understand how our specific biology is reacting to it… and allowing us to troubleshoot and course correct when it isn’t getting the desired results we’re looking for from it. Today’s guest is Jimmy Moore. In 2004, Jimmy, at 32 years, weighed 410 pounds. Since then he has transformed his own biology, shedding all that additional weight with low carb and ketogenic diets. He has also interviewed n Continue reading >>

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

One of the questions people who are new to the LCHF (keto/ketogenic/low carb) diet frequently ask me is: how do I know if I’m in ketosis? What are the main signs of ketosis? Everyone’s different and while some may experience all of the symptoms of ketosis, some might only feel a couple of them. Some feel none at all. There are basic signs and symptoms that indicate that you’re in ketosis. But please note that I’m differentiating between the signs of keto flu (covered in the post I’m linking to) that many experience in the first days of a ketogenic diet, and the feeling of being in ketosis when the flu has subsided: Dry mouth (eat more salt and drink more water to alleviate this). See my keto breath article here. Weight loss. Yay! Metallic taste in your mouth or a strange taste in the back of your throat. Some describe it as fruity or a little sweet. A kind of “buzzing” feeling that’s hard to describe. Almost euphoric at times. Different kind of urine smell, stronger too! “Ketosis breath” – It can range from being a little sweet to being almost like you’ve had a drink of alcohol. Less appetite. You can go for hours without eating and don’t feel very hungry. Increased energy. If you don’t experience it try to eat more fat. Also, drink more water and watch your electrolytes. A ketone strip you pee on shows a positive result. There are also blood ketone meters, or the popular ketone breath test, that give a more specific result. (Pro-tip: If you get the pee strips, cut them in half ) But do note that even with a positive pee strip it’s not 100% certain that you’re in ketosis. A very dark positive result may only indicate that you’re dehydrated. For me personally, the main signs of ketosis are hard to miss. I just feel different! It’s hard Continue reading >>

Fasting, Ketosis And Fat Loss

Fasting, Ketosis And Fat Loss

“…..in sixteen days, I lost 6.6 kilograms or 15 pounds…..” “….my blood sugar went down to 49 mg/dl, a dangerously low level by most medical standards…..” haha Fasting is defined as an act of willing abstinence from food for a prolonged period. The objective of a fast is to give the body a break from digesting food, though allowing the natural repair processes within the body, to take place. When food intake stops, the body is compelled to live of the energy it has stored, primarily body fat. The main purpose of having body fat is to temporarily store it as an energy source. If we did not have this storage capability, we could not sleep through the night between dinner and breakfast, without having to wake up and snack every few hours. Because body fat is the main energy source during a fast, this time period can be very effective in reducing body weight that is carried in the form of excess fat tissue. haha Within the first twenty four to forty eight hours of fasting, the body enters into a state known as ketosis. This is a natural condition where compounds called ketones start to be produced in the liver, from body fat being mobilized for energy. All of our body’s muscles and organs, aside from the brain, can use fat directly as energy. hahha haha haha hahah ah ah aha h ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah hh The only way fat can fuel the brain is when it gets converted into Ketones. Once blood sugar starts to drop, as it inevitably does during a fast as the glycogen (sugar) stores gradually become depleted, then Ketones become the only other alternate source of fuel for the brain. Ketosis is a completely natural state and an essential bodily function, especially during a fast. haha On the 12th of January 2015, I embarked on an extended fast. The main Continue reading >>

Dave Asprey: Problems With Ketosis, Getting Kids To Eat Healthy, And Carb Timing For Sustained Fat-burning

Dave Asprey: Problems With Ketosis, Getting Kids To Eat Healthy, And Carb Timing For Sustained Fat-burning

Dave Asprey, founder of Bulletproof and author of New York Times bestseller The Bulletproof Diet, is a Silicon Valley investor and technology entrepreneur who spent two decades and over $300,000 hacking his own biology. Dave lost 100 pounds without counting calories or excessive exercise, used biohacking techniques to upgrade his brain by more than 20 IQ points, and lowered his biological age while learning to sleep more efficiently in less time. Learning to do these seemingly impossible things transformed him into a better entrepreneur, a better husband, and a better father. Dave and I are good friends, and today we’re talking about his new sexy hair—and just how he keeps it so meticulously beautiful… Actually, we’re digging into the problems with ketosis—and what to do about them. Plus, how to easily feed your kids properly (yes, kids can like sushi and sardines), and the trick to tackling food cravings. First off, Dave claims that there’s nothing in his hair– he simply stopped cutting it in January and has been using a lot of collagen… now it’s really long in just three months! He also has been floating in his floatation tank, which gives his hair a nice magnesium salt soak. So, he’s rocking this awesome 70’s style. KETOSIS: TACKLING THE PROBLEMS WITH GREAT RESULTS The listeners on The Fat Burning-Man show have been asking a lot about ketosis, and there can’t be a more perfect guest to answer those questions than Mr. Ketosis himself. Ketosis is what we like to call “fat-burning mode.” It’s when your body switches to burning fat instead of burning sugar. Our bodies are stupidly lazy– which allows us to stay alive for a long period of time and reproduce… which is kind of important. But that means you’re going to burn sugar first beca Continue reading >>

It’s Okay If You Get Hungry

It’s Okay If You Get Hungry

I spend a lot of time online in LCHF/Keto forums, mostly on Facebook, and there are lots of things I notice being posted over and over. I am addressing another one today. People seem to have a fear of being hungry. Like, they are afraid to get too hungry. I do understand this as I used to have the same fear, but with this way of life, hunger is freedom. What do I mean? I mean that to know TRUE HUNGER is a good thing. We should only be eating when we are experiencing true hunger, but I notice a lot of people pursuing a Keto/LCHF way of life are still hanging on to the old rules. Rules like, “you should eat 4-6 small meals throughout the day” and eating by the clock, “Oh, it’s noon – time for lunch!” UGH! No, please, let’s stop the madness. If you are insulin resistant and/or Type 2 Diabetic, the worst thing you can do is eat every couple of hours! Your blood sugar will never regulate and you won’t heal your diabetes if you are constantly eating, even if you are eating Keto. Allow yourself to go hours and hours without food. You won’t shrivel up. Eat healthy fats and they will satiate you for hours. What’s that? You haven’t eaten in five hours?? Seriously, it’s okay to go hours and hours without food. You won’t slow down your metabolism, you probably won’t pass out (unless you’re the dramatic type) and if what you ate five hours ago was a lot of healthy fat you won’t even notice it’s been five hours since you’ve eaten. I generally have a fat-laden coffee in the morning and then I do not feel hungry for about 4-6 hours later. Then I eat a meal that is very low carb or zero carb, with protein and fat – such as a 6 oz bunless burger, topped with one slice of cheese or two oz, of cream cheese, mushrooms and avocado. I am then full again f Continue reading >>

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