diabetestalk.net

Which Is Better Ketosis Vs Paleo

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

DIETARY SHOWDOWN! PALEO VS. KETO VS. ATKINS! Hey there Fit Farmers! As you know, our approach to nutrition and eating here on the farm is all about real food for the real world. Most dieting scenarios end in disaster due to the inability to keep up the restrictive measure of calories or carbs or some other ingredient involved, which is why our approach differs from most most of the mainstream nutritional plans and lifestyles. But what if your specific body chemistry actually responds really well to a particular nutritional plan? Today we’re going to talk specifically about Keto, Atkins and Paleo. Often lumped together under the heading of “low carb fad diets”, these eating methodologies actually have very significant differences. Is one superior? Is one right for your body chemistry? Can they be used as short term “boost measures” to kickstart better health, rest and weight loss? In today’s post we’ll take a deeper dive into each of these diet types and see if we can come up with some answers, so hang on tight! THE PALEO DIET The name of this diet is taken from the Paleolithic period of human development, in which cavemen first began to use stone tools and sharpened points to hunt with, and also began to control and use fire. Regardless of your views on history and anthropology, the theme of the diet is to only eat what foods were available to these ‘Paleolithic peoples’ as they roamed about hunting and gathering — primarily meat, eggs, fish, and fresh fruits and vegetables. This is done in the belief that these are the food sources that humans are best adapted to rather than the agricultural products and processed foods that came much later in our evolutionary span. Critics point out that (if you buy into the historical basis here) human digestive a Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto and Paleo are two of the most popular diets of the 21st century. But what’s the difference between them? Which one will help you lose weight? Which one will help you heal your health? A Quick Summary of The Differences Between Keto And Paleo: Focus on Ketone Levels: A Keto diet focuses on raising your body’s ketone levels by altering your food choices so you enter a metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. A Paleo diet doesn’t pay attention to ketone levels. Focus on Food Quality: A Paleo diet focuses strongly on choosing whole foods that are nutrient-dense, high-quality, and free from toxins. A healthy Keto diet should also include high quality food, but this isn’t the emphasis. Amount of Carbs: A Keto diet has a very low carbohydrate intake. While a Paleo diet is certainly lower in carbs than many other diets out there, it typically still has a higher carb intake than a Keto diet. Amount of Fat: A Keto diet puts far greater emphasis on increasing your fat intake than a Paleo diet. Although Paleo does encourage eating healthy fats, it’s not typically as high fat as a Keto diet. This is a very brief explanation of the differences between Keto and Paleo, so please keep reading to discover more about both diets. Want to figure out which diet is best for you? We’ll cover that below… The 4 Main Differences Between A Keto And Paleo Diet: Here’s a more detailed breakdown of the key differences between Keto and Paleo: Keto vs Paleo – Difference #1 – A Keto diet focuses on raising your ketone levels. The Keto diet has one main aim: raising your ketone levels so you reach nutritional ketosis. If you’re new to all this, then ketosis might be a bit confusing. So let me explain… What are ketones? Ketones (or ketone bodies) are naturally produced by y Continue reading >>

Primal Fat Burner, Paleo Or Ketogenic? Clarifying The Similarities And Differences

Primal Fat Burner, Paleo Or Ketogenic? Clarifying The Similarities And Differences

I was recently contacted by someone through Facebook who wanted to know how the idea of being ‘ketogenic’ differs from that of ‘paleo’. The (somewhat loaded) question actually prompted me to write this article. I realized it was important to better delve into not only these two definitions, but also how they each are defined within my own, unique approach to diet and health that “hybridizes”, if you will, certain aspects of these genres. I find myself frequently saying that if there was any one word I could strike from the identifiers of “the paleo diet” or “the ketogenic diet” —or “the Primal diet”, for that matter, it would be the word “THE”. After many years now of mingling in the paleosphere and following the work of multiple ketogenic experts and innumerable adherents of these two dietary approaches, I can tell you that there are almost as many approaches to these generic “diets” as there are persons claiming to practice them. First, the Paleo-thing The most general concept of “paleo” eating is predicated on the idea that we should be basing our diet on those pre-agricultural foods that would have been most readily available to our primitive ancestors. It technically avoids (in the purest sense) most all sources of highly processed foods, grains and legumes and most dairy products. But as with most things, there are a huge number of variations and deviations from this core concept. Butter, cream and cheeses are commonly included in many of the more popularized ‘paleo’ approaches. Some also even insist upon promoting the consumption of other post-agricultural foods such as non-gluten-containing grains, rice, legumes and starchy potatoes (none of which is really defensible from a Paleo standpoint at all). One newer book claim Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Keto And Paleo

The Difference Between Keto And Paleo

The difference between Keto and Paleo is a question I get a lot, along with the difference between Paleo and Whole30. Keto and Paleo are often confused, and they have enough similarities that it makes sense as to why that happens. I’m not here to tell you which is better, which is right and wrong. I’m well aware that there’s not one answer for everyone. Our bodies, schedules, health goals and preferences are all different. What I can do though is help you make informed decisions by learning what the key differences between Keto and Paleo are. First, Some Definitions: Keto, short for the Ketogenic diet, is a low carb way of eating which promotes the production of ketones in the liver to be used as energy. When you eat carbs, the body produces glucose as a response. In simplified terms, glucose is easy for your body to covert and then use as energy, and will be chosen over any other energy source. Because your body is using glucose as energy, fats are stored instead of used. With higher carbohydrate diets, the body is always using glucose to run, especially if your activity level is low. With Keto, you’re lowering your intake of carbs, reducing the amount of glucose produced, dropping your insulin levels (your fat storing hormone), and causing your body to go into a fat burning state.. AKA, Ketosis. Ketosis is a natural metabolic state initiated by the body to help us function normally when food intake (carbohydrates) is low. When our body is in ketosis, we produce those ketones I just mentioned. Ketones are produced when the liver breaks down fats to use as energy. Therefore, by bringing our body into a state of ketosis, we’re burning fat as energy, not glucose. This, as you can image, helps to reduce the stored fat we have because we’re using it! Keto isn’ Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is Ketosis Safe?

Any diet, by definition, is a group of foods consumed for a certain period of time. A “diet” can be as simple as an average daily meal or it can also be part of a treatment program for specific medical conditions. The ketogenic diet, which allows someone to enter a state of nutritional “ketosis”, has long been used in the treatment of epilepsy in children – but its benefits go way beyond this. As you’ll learn, recent studies show that a ketogenic diet can have many uses and benefits – including weight loss, reduced inflammation, cancer-prevention, as more. History of Ketogenic Diets The ketogenic diet was first introduced in 1924 at the Mayo clinic by Dr. Russel Wilder who started the diet to treat epileptic patients. He put his patients on a “fast” and found that epileptic symptoms became less frequent. The popularity of this diet as a means of controlling epilepsy has decreased since this time since powerful anticonvulsant drugs have been invented, but this doesn’t mean that ketogenic diets are not promoted for better health any longer. Since its introduction in the 1920s, the ketogenic diet and entering ketosis remains controversial until today. Although it has many benefits and is a natural approach to controlling disease in some cases, many doctors and patients often find it easier to administer pills than to adhere to a ketogenic diet that they find “strict’ and restrictive. The exact mechanism by which the ketogenic diet works still isn’t 100% known, but the results of ketosis that have been researched for years are staggering. What is A Ketogenic Diet? Today ketogenic diets get the most attention when it comes to weight loss and blood sugar control. “Burn fat by eating more fat” is one simple way to describe the approach that allows Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Keto And Paleo Diet? Are They The Same?

What's The Difference Between Keto And Paleo Diet? Are They The Same?

Starting a new diet can be a difficult decision. In this day and age, there are many variations of diet plans that you might choose... Too many, to be honest. Recently the paleo and the ketogenic diet have started trending amongst people who are looking to improve their lives and lose weight at the same time. With the rise of these two methods, the question in a lot of people's minds are, "what's better, paleo or keto?" Well, that's a question that we will be answering in this article. But first, let's get into what these two are and what goes into the process before we choose which one has the upper hand. Some of the benefits that you can gain from both of these plans include the reduction of inflammation, increasing your immunity, clear mental status, and decreasing any diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart diseases. The paleo and ketogenic diet apply the same type of principles regarding losing weight but there are some subtle differences between the two. There are some people that mistakenly think that paleo is the same with keto. It is important that you understand how each of these diets works and how they can positively affect you in both short and long term. When it comes to a long-term plan of diet, both are great choices but paleo is more of a short-term lifestyle than keto is. Both have its advantages in different categories and we will be talking about that right now. Okay, so now let's get into the discussion of what these diets really are before we decide which one of them is actually better. So, will it be keto or paleo? First, Let's Talk About the Ketogenic Diet This type of method involves a very low carbohydrate diet. It is a very famous one because of its variations in terms of benefits from it. This also has other names such as the keto, non-ca Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs Keto Diet – Which Plan Is Best For Weight Loss And Health

Paleo Vs Keto Diet – Which Plan Is Best For Weight Loss And Health

Thanks to Robert Atkins low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diets such as Paleo and Keto have become very popular, but whats best for health and or weight loss. The Paleo and Keto Diets are similar in some ways, but the variations in principles make them unique from one another often with different outcomes. Paleo vs Keto “Two low-carb diets, two distinct ways of thinking”. The difference: It’s important to remember that the Ketogenic Diet was developed as a tool for disease control, not weight loss. Weight loss on Keto was incidental. The Keto Diet eventuated as a dietary intervention for conditions like epilepsy. More recently it has been shown to have promising results reversing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. There are also studies being conducted on Alzheimers Disease. The objective of Keto is to force the body into a state of ketosis. With a Ketogenic Diet plan, you reach ketosis by drastically limiting carbohydrate intake compared to modern high carb/sugar foods while significantly increasing fat intake. The Keto Diet prescribes that dieters eat 70% of their calories in fat, 5% of their calories from carbohydrate and 25% from protein (Be aware that too much protein is bad for Ketosis). That’s lots of fat. Paleo doesn’t do macros like that. For example; A Keto meal may include a moderate portion of beef, some cruciferous vegetables, and a significant amount of fat, typically oil, cream or butter. It’s a true Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet (LCHF Diet). What is the Paleo Diet (Paleolithic Diet)? The Paleo Diet concentrates more on eating meat under the belief that ancient cave dwellers had no access to grain and processed foods, thus had no other option than to consume a diet primarily composed of protein and fat. Practitioners of Paleo focus on getting nutrition Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Paleo Diet – What’s Best For Me?

Keto Vs Paleo Diet – What’s Best For Me?

The Ketogenic Diet and Paleo Diet are two of the most popular weight loss diets, and you'll find that they both have a lot in common! They both promote a diet low in carbohydrates and processed food and an increased in intake in protein, veggies, and other natural foods. Many people have tried both diets and seen great success in their weight loss efforts. But which is better? Are either of the diets more effective than the other? Most importantly, is it the diet YOU should try? Read on to find out everything you need to know about these two diets and how they stack up against each other… The purpose of restricting your intake of carbs is to create a metabolic state called ketosis. It causes the body to use fat as a source of energy instead of glucose (aka carbs) in the blood and liver. When carbs are restricted low enough, the body produces ketones which can be used as energy. A Look at the Diets Before we get into the pros and cons of each, let's take a closer look at what the diets are all about: The Paleo Diet -- The Paleo Diet is built around the belief that our Paleolithic-era ancestors ate much healthier than we did, as they consumed only food that they hunted or gathered. This means no dairy products, no grains, and certainly no refined foods! The diet is heavy on fish, meat, veggies, fruits, nuts, and seeds. The Ketogenic Diet -- The Ketogenic Diet is a diet that revolves around the "high-fat, low-carb" principle. This is intended to promote a better ketogenic (fat-burning) balance in the body. The diet is founded on the concept that the human body burns carbs as its primary energy source, but it can also burn fat. By changing up your diet, you consume foods that encourage your body to burn fat for fuel instead of carbs. This makes it easier for your body to Continue reading >>

Switching From Low-carb Or Keto To Paleo

Switching From Low-carb Or Keto To Paleo

Disclaimer: some people do perfectly fine on very low-carb or ketogenic diets for years and years. If that’s you, great! But if that’s not you, then you might find something useful here. Frustrated by low-carb? Did it stop working for you, or maybe you’re just tired of the intense restriction on everything from carrots to kale? It might be time to try a different tack: instead of focusing only on carbs, try a more rounded Paleo approach. What’s the Difference? On a low-carb diet, the goal is exactly that: to minimize carbs, usually for the purpose of weight loss (although sometimes it’s for other reasons – for example, people who try a ketogenic diet to control epilepsy). On a Paleo diet, the goal is to make appropriate nutritional choices considering your evolutionary history. You can do a low-carb version of Paleo, but just cutting carbs does not automatically make a diet Paleo, and Paleo is about a whole set of food choices, not just carbs. Here’s a chart comparing some key differences: Generic low-carb/keto Paleo Carbohydrate level Low Variable; low to medium. Ultimate goal Typically weight loss (although there are exceptions) Better health (sometimes this includes weight loss) Is soy sauce (containing wheat) allowed? Yes, since the tiny amount of carbohydrate is negligible. No, since wheat is a gut irritant. Is canola oil (containing lots of Omega-6 fats) allowed? Yes, since it has no carbs. No, since Omega-6 fats are inflammatory and unhealthy. Are sweet potatoes (containing significant amounts of carbohydrate) allowed? No, since they have carbs. Yes, since they are full of nutrients and do not contain any toxins or gut irritants. Is tofu (containing soy) allowed? Yes, since it has few carbs. No; soy is full of inflammatory Omega-6 fats and other pro Continue reading >>

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

“There are a lot of similarities between Paleolithic (Paleo) and ketogenic diets (KD), particularly when compared to the now discredited ‘Standard American’ low fat, high carbohydrate diet. As a result, people may reasonably assume that all low carb diets are pretty much equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth, and the resultant confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. The similarities between Paleo and keto cluster around what they exclude: all grains and grain products (refined and unrefined), peas and beans, and refined sugars. In addition, the paleo diet excludes all dairy (milk, cream, and cheese), whereas the ketogenic diet allows butter, full fat cream and natural cheeses. The differences between the Paleo diet and KD are many, including: Range of foods allowed Recommended amounts of protein Amounts and sources of carbohydrates allowed or recommended Type, quality, and quantity of science supporting diet safety and efficacy Most importantly, the source and consistency of fuel to supply brain energy needs – specifically the availability of ketones at adequate levels to replace glucose as the brain’s primary fuel” “This diagram points out the similarities between ketogenic and Paleo diets, especially when compared to the now discredited low fat diets of the past. But clearly the Paleo and well-formulated ketogenic diets nonetheless are different, with little overlap in their respective compositions. Thus the major metabolic difference between Paleo and KD is encompassed in the phrase ‘nutritional ketosis’. By definition, a ‘ketogenic diet’ allows your body to be in nutritional keto Continue reading >>

Keto Vs. Paleo: Which Diet Is Better?

Keto Vs. Paleo: Which Diet Is Better?

Diet trends come and go, but there are two eating styles that have grabbed hold of the fitness community with vigor. The ketogenic diet, also known as a “keto” diet, and the Paleo diet, often referred to as the “caveman” diet. But if you’re looking to clean up your kitchen, which one is better: keto or paleo? Unfortunately, there is no single answer that works for everyone. The best eating program for you is the one you can stick to for life! So if you want to find out which is better for you, read on to explore the main differences between keto and Paleo to choose for yourself. What is a Keto Diet? A keto—or ketogenic—diet is one made up primarily of fat. Yep, that’s right…fat. If you follow a keto meal plan you’ll consume roughly 70-90 percent of your calories from fat. According to most keto diet plans, you’ll divide the other 10-30 percent of your calories between carbohydrates and protein. Fat loss occurs on a ketogenic diet when your body is forced to burn fat for fuel. When you eliminate most carbohydrates from your diet, your body doesn’t have access to its preferred energy source: glucose. In the absence of glucose, you burn fat for energy and produce ketones, or ketone bodies, as a byproduct. Many keto dieters test for the presence of ketones by using urine strips. When ketone levels are high enough, you are in state of “ketosis.” Will a Keto Diet Help You Lose Weight? While it might seem counterintuitive to eat fat for improved fitness, health or weight loss, the diet generally produces results if you can stay on it. And there is scientific evidence that it works. The eating plan was first developed in the 1920s to help patients with seizure disorders. Researchers found that not only did it help patients reduce symptoms, but many o Continue reading >>

Three Major Differences Between The Ketogenic And Paleo Diets

Three Major Differences Between The Ketogenic And Paleo Diets

When I talk to people about the ketogenic diet and lifestyle, one of the most common questions I get asked is, “Is that like paleo?” My usual response is something along the lines of, “It’s like a modified paleo.” And I will typically leave it at that. However, I think it’s important for you to be able to identify the differences between the two, not because one is inherently better than the other, but because I think everyone should be aware of their options. While there are many similarities between paleo and keto, there are at least three major differences. Paleo isn’t necessarily low carb In theory, the idea behind paleo is to tap into the ancient ways of eating, the ways that our ancestors ate. Because several thousand years ago, there were no such things as processed foods and sugar wasn’t readily or widely accessible, people didn’t eat those things. Because people also didn’t have the ability to go buy their food, they had to find it for themselves. That meant hunting and gathering. For pure energy, nothing beats eating fat. It has more energy per gram than carbs or protein. So that means finding and eating fatty animals. So a paleo diet, just like a keto diet, focuses on getting fat and protein as a primary source of energy. However, the big difference is paleo doesn’t avoid potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and other tubers and root vegetables. These particular vegetables fit completely within the paleo framework, but they should be avoided in a keto diet. Paleo’s focus is on tapping into the ancient ways. Keto’s focus is on keeping insulin levels very low and ketone levels really high. So avoiding foods like potatoes and the like is a big difference for keto folks. Paleo isn’t necessarily high fat Wait, didn’t I just say that pal Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet & Ketosis

Paleo Diet & Ketosis

The Paleo diet is based on foods humans used to eat during the Paleolithic period, which ended 10,000 years ago. The idea is that human genes have evolved to eat particular foods, which have been replaced by many refined and processed foods in our diet nowadays. Advocates of the Paleo diet claim that it is the best one for keeping your weight under control and optimizing health. Video of the Day The Paleo diet focuses on unprocessed and whole foods. Carbohydrates are almost nonexistent on a Paleo diet, since agriculture had not been introduced at that time. Therefore grains, legumes, any food made from flour, as well as dairy products and sugars are excluded from this diet plan. Instead, the Paleo diet is based on an adequate amount of protein from grass-fed meat, free-range poultry and eggs and wild-caught fish. The diet also includes generous servings of healthy fats, including avocado, olives and olive oil, coconut oil, nuts and seeds. Seasonal fruits and vegetables are also part of the foods allowed on the Paleo diet. What Is Ketosis Low-carb diets are usually ketogenic diets because they induce a metabolic pathway called ketosis. When you consume very limited amounts of carbohydrates, the body needs to switch from using carbohydrates to using fat as its main source of energy, as explained by Dr. Michael Eades. By burning fat for fuel, the body produces ketone bodies that can be used by different organs, such as your muscles, brain and heart. Ketosis constitutes a normal metabolic pathway and is not harmful, say diet proponents. Following low-carb diets, such as the Paleo diet, is a good way to induce ketosis and force your body into fat-burning mode. In addition to burning fat for energy, ketogenic diets have been shown to make people feel fuller on fewer calories. Continue reading >>

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

I was in my 20s when I started suffering from severe fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. I was 300 pounds, sick constantly, and almost had to drop out of grad school because I couldn’t concentrate. Back then, I thought my inability to think clearly and perform at high levels was some sort of moral failing. I would beat myself up. I would work harder and stay up later, trying to catch up with my peers. I tried every diet imaginable, including raw vegan and years of falling off the low-fat bandwagon. I hit the treadmill for hours every day. Nothing worked. So I took matters into my own hands. The Bulletproof Diet was born after a decade of working with some of the world’s top health and nutrition researchers. Over a span of about 15 years, I devoured thousands of research papers and books on human nutrition. I used my body as a testing ground to determine what worked best for my biology. The result is a diet that has helped thousands of people lose fat and gain the energy and clarity they thought they’d lost forever. So, what differentiates the Bulletproof Diet from other low-carb diets? Read on to find out. For an in-depth plan on how to boost energy and increase brain function in just two weeks, get your copy of Head Strong. Bulletproof vs. Paleo: The Big Picture If you were to map out the most popular diets, you’d see a vast spectrum of practices and plans ranging from low-fat vegan to high-fat, low-carb (HFLC). This deliciously fatty end of the spectrum is where the Bulletproof Diet and the Primal, Paleo, and Atkins diets would lie. The Paleo diet eliminates processed foods and focuses on what our paleolithic ancestors ate – mostly meat, plants, nuts, and seeds. The Bulletproof Diet is similar but designed to maximize your willpower by reducing cravings and m Continue reading >>

More in ketosis