diabetestalk.net

Where Is The Excess Glucose Stored In A Plant?

Share on facebook

Photosynthesis | Photosynthesis in plants | Photosynthesis - Biology basics for children | Science | elearnin Photosynthesis Hello Kids .... Do you know how plants make their own food? No?? This video elaborates the process of Photosynthesis, by which plants make their own food. Photosynthesis is the process used by the plants to make their food. In simpler terms, conversion of light energy into chemical energy by plants is called photosynthesis. This chemical energy is used by the plants for growth and nourishment. Photo means light and synthesis means putting together. Humans need some essential things like fire, water, vegetables etc to cook food. Similarly, to make their own food, plants also need some essential factors like Light, water, nutrients, soil etc Plants get light from the sun, water from the ground and carbon dioxide from air. All these factors including air, water, carbondioxide and sunlight together help plants churn out their own food. Plants have tubes called Xylem located in the stem through which the water from the ground is sucked into the leaves. This system works similar to the humans sucking in liquids through a straw. The Xylem is spread throughout the different parts of plant including stem, branches, all the way upto their leaves, and transports vital nutrients to the entire plant. Xylems in plants are like blood vessels in the human body that act as an important means of transport for water and nutrients. Leaves on the plants have pores, very similar to pores on the skin of our body. These pores are called stomata. These stomata are responsible for the exchange of gases. The carbon dioxide present in the air, which is responsible for photosynthesis, enters the plant through these stomata. Oxygen also comes out from the same stomata. Leaf has important cells called Mesophyll cells. These cells contain a green color component called chloroplast. This chloroplast is responsible for the green color of plants and leaves. Once the carbon dioxide and water reach the chloroplasts, in the presence of sunlight, the process of photosynthesis starts to take place. The following reaction takes places in the leaves of the plant during photosynthesis: Carbon dioxide + water + [in the presence of light energy] Oxygen + glucose (or Carbohydrates) The products formed are glucose and oxygen. Carbohydrates, which are a form of glucose, are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water. Glucose is used by the plants for the growth. Some of the glucose is used immediately and the extra glucose which is not used is stored in the form of starch, in the leaves. Some amount of glucose is also stored in the roots of the plants. The extra glucose is used to perform photosynthesis when there is no sunlight. Oxygen is given out into the air through the stomata in the process of photosynthesis. The oxygen that is released is used by human beings to breathe in during their respiration process. Ever wondered why this process is called photosynthesis? The word photosynthesis is a combination of two words: Photo and Synthesis. Photo means light in Greek and Synthesis means putting together or combining. Hence, photosynthesis literally means combining water and carbon dioxide in the presence of light. So, the essential factors for photosynthesis to take place include: Sunlight Water Carbon dioxide Underwater photosynthesis takes place at a slower pace than the normal photosynthesis. This is because energy from the sun is absorbed by the water layers and only some amount of the energy reaches the plant. There are some plants which don't need the process of photosynthesis to grow. Such plants include Mushroom, Venus flytrap etc. Mushroom gets the food from the ground and its surrounding areas. Venus flytrap traps and catches small insects which come near the leaves and eat them.

How Can A Plant Use The Sugars Made In Photosynthesis?

How can a plant use the sugars made in photosynthesis? During the process of photosynthesis, plants utilize sunlight and convert it into useful products, according to the following well-balanced chemical equation: `6CO_2 + 6H_2O + sunlight -> C_6H_12O_6 + 6O_2` In this reaction, glucose (a common sugar) is produced. These glucose molecules are used by the plant in a number of ways. The most common use is the production of energy (in the form of ATP molecules) through the process of cellular respiration. This process... During the process of photosynthesis, plants utilize sunlight and convert it into useful products, according to the following well-balanced chemical equation: `6CO_2 + 6H_2O + sunlight -> C_6H_12O_6 + 6O_2` In this reaction, glucose (a common sugar) is produced. These glucose molecules are used by the plant in a number of ways. The most common use is the production of energy (in the form of ATP molecules) through the process of cellular respiration. This process can be summarized by the following equation: `C_6H_12O_6 + 6O_2 -> 6CO_2 + 6H_2O + ATP` Note that most of the processes require energy, including the process of photosynthesis. During the daytime hours, when Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Santi Santichaivekin

    I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?

  2. Jayachandran

    Glucose, fructose and galactose are the three dietary monosaccharides. Glucose and Fructose are simple monosaccharides found in plants. A monosaccharide is the basic unit of carbohydrate and the simplest form of sugar, glucose are aldose and Fructose are ketose.
    If the carbonyl is at position 1 (that is, n or m is zero), the molecule begins with a formyl group H(C=O)-, and is technically an aldehyde. In that case, the compound is termed an aldose. Otherwise, the molecule has a keto group, a carbonyl -(C=O)- between two carbons; then it is formally a ketone, and is termed a ketose. Ketoses of biological interest usually have the carbonyl at position 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosaccharide
    Whereas Sucrose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. A disaccharide is more complex than monosaccharide, more complex compounds like oligosaccharides and polysaccharides exists. Sucrose synthesised within the cytosol of photosynthesizing cells is then available for general distribution and is commonly trans located to other carbon-demanding centers via the phloem.
    Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy efficient sucrose is chosen to be the carrier of energy from leaves to different part of the tree. Another problem exists, glucose is highly reactive and this may result in some intermediate reactions while transporting glucose. Being a complex structure, sucrose is not as much reactive as glucose. So plants uses the sucrose as a medium to transfer energy. Inside the cells, sucrose is converted back to glucose and fructose. Energy is yielded when it is needed. So plants transfer glucose and fructose in the form of sucrose in order to:
    Increase energy storage
    Efficient energy transfer
    Removing in between reactions
    References
    Carbohydrates
    Sucrose & Starch Biosynthesis
    Sucrose Metabolism
    Sucrose and starch synthesis
    Disaccharide

  3. graphene

    there is no free glucose in the photosynthesis. Stop to spread that myth. The net product is G3P. The end products of photosynthesis are sucrose and starch, but never glucose. Do you test glucose in the leaves? No... it is always for starch. ;) The G3P is converted to sucrose and other molecules, for example, thiamine. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate occurs as a reactant in the biosynthesis pathway of thiamine (Vitamin B1), another substance that cannot be produced by the human body. Part of sucrose is then translocated to the phloem. Starch is stored in the stroma of chloroplasts. It is also stored in the amyloplasts in the roots, stems cells after sucrose suffers a conversion to starch.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

weat glucose sensor Can Monitor Blood Glucose With Your Sweat | wearable glucose meter | Sweat patch It is known that, from a small amount of blood can be used to measure the quantity of blood sugar, but now South Korea specialists have been successful in developing a wrist belt for measuring the amount of blood sugar to measure the sugar volume with the help of sweat. Specialists of the National University of South Korea in Seoul have made wrist bandages, after a minor change, it can also be applied to the use of fine syringe needles, which can inject medicine by detecting the increased quantity of blood sugar. Commenting on this invention, Dr. Paul Jenkins, Sweat patch accurately calculates blood glucose levels and administers metformin in mice: https://www.diabetes.co.uk/news/2017/... London Endocrin Center's Expert, says that this is an interesting concern for controlling diabetes, if it is useful after mass testing, it will provide great benefits to the diabetic patient. This will alleviate the painful process of inserting needle to detect sugar level. It is tied to the upper part of the arm and notes the amount of blood sugar in the sweat quickly and efficiently. A recent study has revealed that it shows results like strip blood sugar standard tests and tells how much medication should be taken to keep blood sugar normally. Now, there is no need of strips and tied band is enough to note the blood sugar volume in blood. Sweat patch blood glucose monitor could replace finger prick tests: https://www.drwf.org.uk/news-and-even... There are 20 million sweat glands found in our body, which secrete that sweat in both situations of exercise and comfort . Glucose is also secreted along with sweat, which reflects the quality of sugar in a proper manner, it has to wear 15 minutes for accurate reading, and it requires only 10 mili litre of sweat. So guys hope you enjoyed the video, Please subscribe to our channel. Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Trendy-Healt... Follow On Twitter: https://twitter.com/TrendyHealthNew Follow On Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/trendyhealth/ Follow on Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/collectio... Follow on linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/treandy-h...

Glucose

Physiology • Glucose in the blood is derived from three main sources: ○ ▪ Glucose is the end-product of carbohydrate digestion, absorbed by enterocytes. ▪ Increased blood glucose concentrations occur 2 to 4 hours after a meal in simple-stomached animals. ○ Hepatic production ▪ Gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis within hepatic cells produce glucose when metabolically necessary. □ Gluconeogenesis converts noncarbohydrate sources, primarily amino acids (from protein) and glycerol (from fat), in simple-stomached animals. □ Glycogenolysis converts glycogen (poly-glucose) stored in hepatocytes to glucose through hydrolysis. ▪ Gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis within hepatic cells produce glucose when metabolically necessary. □ Gluconeogenesis converts noncarbohydrate sources, primarily amino acids (from protein) and glycerol (from fat), in simple-stomached animals. □ Glycogenolysis converts glycogen (poly-glucose) stored in hepatocytes to glucose through hydrolysis. ○ ▪ Gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis within renal epithelial cells can result in the formation of glucose when metabolically necessary. • The plasma concentration of glucose is controlled by a n Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Santi Santichaivekin

    I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?

  2. Jayachandran

    Glucose, fructose and galactose are the three dietary monosaccharides. Glucose and Fructose are simple monosaccharides found in plants. A monosaccharide is the basic unit of carbohydrate and the simplest form of sugar, glucose are aldose and Fructose are ketose.
    If the carbonyl is at position 1 (that is, n or m is zero), the molecule begins with a formyl group H(C=O)-, and is technically an aldehyde. In that case, the compound is termed an aldose. Otherwise, the molecule has a keto group, a carbonyl -(C=O)- between two carbons; then it is formally a ketone, and is termed a ketose. Ketoses of biological interest usually have the carbonyl at position 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosaccharide
    Whereas Sucrose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. A disaccharide is more complex than monosaccharide, more complex compounds like oligosaccharides and polysaccharides exists. Sucrose synthesised within the cytosol of photosynthesizing cells is then available for general distribution and is commonly trans located to other carbon-demanding centers via the phloem.
    Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy efficient sucrose is chosen to be the carrier of energy from leaves to different part of the tree. Another problem exists, glucose is highly reactive and this may result in some intermediate reactions while transporting glucose. Being a complex structure, sucrose is not as much reactive as glucose. So plants uses the sucrose as a medium to transfer energy. Inside the cells, sucrose is converted back to glucose and fructose. Energy is yielded when it is needed. So plants transfer glucose and fructose in the form of sucrose in order to:
    Increase energy storage
    Efficient energy transfer
    Removing in between reactions
    References
    Carbohydrates
    Sucrose & Starch Biosynthesis
    Sucrose Metabolism
    Sucrose and starch synthesis
    Disaccharide

  3. graphene

    there is no free glucose in the photosynthesis. Stop to spread that myth. The net product is G3P. The end products of photosynthesis are sucrose and starch, but never glucose. Do you test glucose in the leaves? No... it is always for starch. ;) The G3P is converted to sucrose and other molecules, for example, thiamine. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate occurs as a reactant in the biosynthesis pathway of thiamine (Vitamin B1), another substance that cannot be produced by the human body. Part of sucrose is then translocated to the phloem. Starch is stored in the stroma of chloroplasts. It is also stored in the amyloplasts in the roots, stems cells after sucrose suffers a conversion to starch.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Don't forget to do the questions that accompany this video, at http://www.macrophage.co -- it's free and only takes 1 second to sign up! Macrophage is the most cutting edge platform for medical education. We use machine learning to adapt our courses to your specific strengths and weaknesses. Make a free account now! http://www.macrophage.co

How Is Excess Glucose Stored?

The human body has an efficient and complex system of storing and preserving energy. Glucose is a type of sugar that the body uses for energy. Glucose is the product of breaking down carbohydrates into their simplest form. Carbohydrates should make up approximately 45 to 65 percent of your daily caloric intake, according to MayoClinic.com. Video of the Day Glucose is a simple sugar found in carbohydrates. When more complex carbohydrates such as polysaccharides and disaccharides are broken down in the stomach, they break down into the monosaccharide glucose. Carbohydrates serve as the primary energy source for working muscles, help brain and nervous system functioning and help the body use fat more efficiently. Function of Glucose Once carbohydrates are absorbed from food, they are carried to the liver for processing. In the liver, fructose and galactose, the other forms of sugar, are converted into glucose. Some glucose gets sent to the bloodstream while the rest is stored for later energy use. Once glucose is inside the liver, glucose is phosphorylated into glucose-6-phosphate, or G6P. G6P is further metabolized into triglycerides, fatty acids, glycogen or energy. Glycogen is the Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Santi Santichaivekin

    I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?

  2. Jayachandran

    Glucose, fructose and galactose are the three dietary monosaccharides. Glucose and Fructose are simple monosaccharides found in plants. A monosaccharide is the basic unit of carbohydrate and the simplest form of sugar, glucose are aldose and Fructose are ketose.
    If the carbonyl is at position 1 (that is, n or m is zero), the molecule begins with a formyl group H(C=O)-, and is technically an aldehyde. In that case, the compound is termed an aldose. Otherwise, the molecule has a keto group, a carbonyl -(C=O)- between two carbons; then it is formally a ketone, and is termed a ketose. Ketoses of biological interest usually have the carbonyl at position 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosaccharide
    Whereas Sucrose is a disaccharide composed of glucose and fructose. A disaccharide is more complex than monosaccharide, more complex compounds like oligosaccharides and polysaccharides exists. Sucrose synthesised within the cytosol of photosynthesizing cells is then available for general distribution and is commonly trans located to other carbon-demanding centers via the phloem.
    Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy efficient sucrose is chosen to be the carrier of energy from leaves to different part of the tree. Another problem exists, glucose is highly reactive and this may result in some intermediate reactions while transporting glucose. Being a complex structure, sucrose is not as much reactive as glucose. So plants uses the sucrose as a medium to transfer energy. Inside the cells, sucrose is converted back to glucose and fructose. Energy is yielded when it is needed. So plants transfer glucose and fructose in the form of sucrose in order to:
    Increase energy storage
    Efficient energy transfer
    Removing in between reactions
    References
    Carbohydrates
    Sucrose & Starch Biosynthesis
    Sucrose Metabolism
    Sucrose and starch synthesis
    Disaccharide

  3. graphene

    there is no free glucose in the photosynthesis. Stop to spread that myth. The net product is G3P. The end products of photosynthesis are sucrose and starch, but never glucose. Do you test glucose in the leaves? No... it is always for starch. ;) The G3P is converted to sucrose and other molecules, for example, thiamine. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate occurs as a reactant in the biosynthesis pathway of thiamine (Vitamin B1), another substance that cannot be produced by the human body. Part of sucrose is then translocated to the phloem. Starch is stored in the stroma of chloroplasts. It is also stored in the amyloplasts in the roots, stems cells after sucrose suffers a conversion to starch.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Where Is Excess Glucose Stored In The Human Body?

    Sort Central Role of ATP in Metabolism -break down of ATP ATP -> ADP + P + Energy -energy RELEASING, catabolic reaction -supplies the energy for most of the energy requiring processes in the body, such as *active transport of substances across cell membranes *muscle contraction (working out) *anabolic reactions such as protein synthesis *cell division ATP Synthesis Energy + ADP + P -> ATP -energy REQUIRING, anabolic reactions -ADP and P can be re ...

    blood sugar May 23, 2018
  • What Does The Plant Do With The Excess Glucose That It Makes?

    What is the ultimate energy source for the process of photosynthesis? What is the basic food made by a plant during photosynthesis? In the cell chloroplasts found in the leaves of the plant Carbon dioxide enters the plant through the stomata. The energy from the sunlight chemically combines the carbon dioxide and water to form sugar and oxygen. The plant uses the sugar for its life processes. the oxygen is released through the stomata. Why do se ...

    blood sugar Apr 26, 2018
  • Where Is Excess Glucose Stored

    Science Biology When the body detects increased levels of glucose or amino acids in the small intestine, beta cells in the pancreas secrete a hormone called insulin that promotes the absorption of glucose by cells in the body. Insulin is also responsible for signalling the conversion of glucose into glycogen. Another method the body has for handling excess glucose is to eliminate some of the glucose in the urine. In most cases, the glucose that m ...

    blood sugar Apr 21, 2018
  • What Does A Plant Do With Excess Glucose

    In your workbook, there is a diagram called the "life cycle" of glucose(Example 28) that attempts to summarize the steps in the synthesis, conversion,polymerization, hydrolysis and oxidation of glucose. Let's take some time to work throughthat diagram. We could start anywhere on this diagram, but I like to start with water and carbon dioxide going through the process of photosynthesis to make glucose and oxygen. Once the plants have done that an ...

    blood sugar May 2, 2018
  • Where Is The Excess Glucose Stored In A Plant?

    The human body has an efficient and complex system of storing and preserving energy. Glucose is a type of sugar that the body uses for energy. Glucose is the product of breaking down carbohydrates into their simplest form. Carbohydrates should make up approximately 45 to 65 percent of your daily caloric intake, according to MayoClinic.com. Video of the Day Glucose is a simple sugar found in carbohydrates. When more complex carbohydrates such as p ...

    ketosis Apr 26, 2018
  • What Does The Plant Do With Excess Glucose That It Makes?

    Sugars and starches are important carbohydrates that we take in often. Carbohydrates provide a great part of the energy in our diets. Foods rich in carbohydrates, including potatoes, bread, and maize, are usually the most abundant and cheapest when compared with foods high in protein and fat content. Carbohydrates are burned during body processes to produce energy, giving out carbon dioxide and water. Starches are found mainly in grains, legumes, ...

    blood sugar Apr 26, 2018

More in ketosis