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Where Does The Word Ketogenic Come From

What's The Difference Between Keto And Paleo Diet? Are They The Same?

What's The Difference Between Keto And Paleo Diet? Are They The Same?

Starting a new diet can be a difficult decision. In this day and age, there are many variations of diet plans that you might choose... Too many, to be honest. Recently the paleo and the ketogenic diet have started trending amongst people who are looking to improve their lives and lose weight at the same time. With the rise of these two methods, the question in a lot of people's minds are, "what's better, paleo or keto?" Well, that's a question that we will be answering in this article. But first, let's get into what these two are and what goes into the process before we choose which one has the upper hand. Some of the benefits that you can gain from both of these plans include the reduction of inflammation, increasing your immunity, clear mental status, and decreasing any diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart diseases. The paleo and ketogenic diet apply the same type of principles regarding losing weight but there are some subtle differences between the two. There are some people that mistakenly think that paleo is the same with keto. It is important that you understand how each of these diets works and how they can positively affect you in both short and long term. When it comes to a long-term plan of diet, both are great choices but paleo is more of a short-term lifestyle than keto is. Both have its advantages in different categories and we will be talking about that right now. Okay, so now let's get into the discussion of what these diets really are before we decide which one of them is actually better. So, will it be keto or paleo? First, Let's Talk About the Ketogenic Diet This type of method involves a very low carbohydrate diet. It is a very famous one because of its variations in terms of benefits from it. This also has other names such as the keto, non-ca Continue reading >>

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is ketosis safe? The truth is that we can’t say for certain that it is 100% safe. Humans don’t understand everything under the branch of nutritional science and probably won’t for a very long time. As an individual, the only thing you can do is take a look at the research yourself and form your own conclusion. Personally, through the reading I’ve done and the experience I’ve had with the Keto diet, I’ve formed my own conclusion that ketosis is safe. Could I be wrong? Absolutely. But I could also be right. I’m willing to take that risk in order to follow a diet which could maximize longevity, well being and function. My personal conclusion shouldn’t matter to you though. You need to do your own research and come to your own conclusion. I’ve put together this post to organize all of the issues surrounding the safety of ketosis so that you can make your own decision. In trying to prove something to be safe there are two ways to go about it. Disprove the claims of danger Show evidence which may be correlated with safety This article will dispel the top 10 claims people make in an argument to label ketosis as dangerous. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. The following data is not meant to 100% prove or disprove the safety of ketosis. It’s merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional strategy we feel is best for ourselves. I’m not a doctor or a researcher. The following information is material I’ve collected in my attempt to feel confident following a Keto diet indefinitely. Most of it is sourced from doctors or authors although I have also included anecdotal accounts from experiences posted on message boards and Reddit. I know, much of the information here isn’t sourced directly from s Continue reading >>

Keto-

Keto-

keto- keto- THE AMERICAN HERITAGE® DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, FIFTH EDITION by the Editors of the American Heritage Dictionaries. Copyright © 2016, 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. keto Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

What Is Keto? My Personal Definition…

What Is Keto? My Personal Definition…

What is keto? (the short version) Keto isn’t a “diet,” it’s a way of life. It’s the basic set of principles that low carb diets are based on. Atkins is one of the most popular keto diets, South Beach is another, Paleo is often considered keto as well, but I’m not doing Atkins, and I’m not doing South Beach. I am doing a lot of Paleo. Get it? OK, I’ll keep going. The keto “diet,” also known as the ketogenic “diet,” is a lifestyle change that is low carb. Everybody does it their own way (hence all the diet names and programs) but the most basic keto diet is a mix of low carb, paleo and gluten-free. The cross-fit folks do it too. No sugar, no bread, no grains, whole foods, real foods. In my version of keto, I don’t eat any artificial sweeteners or processed foods, but those on Atkins do. That’s their version of the keto diet, which is fine for them, but just not for me. On a fundamental keto diet, you’ll eat 20-50 carbohydrates per day (typical Americans eat 300) and under 1700 calories per day, although that number is variable based on your weight and activity levels. It’s ridiculously simple to eat under 1700 calories per day when you eliminate carbohydrates. It’s also easy in general, because carbohydrates make you hungry, so without them, you’re never hungry (take it from a former pasta addict!) And it’s a low-carb diet, but it’s not a bacon butter fest. My diet is actually pretty balanced, all of my carbohydrates come from vegetables, because I also believe in making sure you’re always eating alkalizing foods. Grass-fed meats and dairy from grass-fed animals are always encouraged because they have healthier fats. Keto has the same benefits of going gluten-free or adopting the paleo diet. It’s proven to help with weight loss, Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

If You’re Going Keto, Read This First

If You’re Going Keto, Read This First

Pay attention to the quality of the meat you consume on a ketogenic diet. Gabriel Garcia Marengo/Unsplash Pay attention to the quality of the meat you consume on a ketogenic diet. Gabriel Garcia Marengo/Unsplash A ketogenic diet is a type of very low-carb diet that is gaining popularity in health and wellness circles for a number of reasons. “Keto,” the root word of ketogenic, is short for “ketosis,” which refers to the metabolic state that occurs when most of the body’s energy comes from ketone bodies in the blood, rather than from glucose. This is in contrast to a glycolytic state, during which blood glucose—or sugar, derived mostly from carbohydrates—provides most of the body’s fuel. If all this sounds too technical, remember that when the body relies on ketones for energy, the results can include blood sugar control and the treatment of certain health conditions, including heart disease and type-2 diabetes. But the most popular consequence reason many people turn a the ketogenic diet is weight loss. A 2014 review published in the International Journal of Environmental Research & Public Health states, “One of the most studied strategies in recent years for weight loss is the ketogenic diet. Many studies have shown that this kind of nutritional approach has a solid physiological and biochemical basis and is able to induce effective weight loss along with improvement in several cardiovascular risk parameters.” While the ketogenic diet can certainly provide many health benefits, it’s important to steer clear of common pitfalls. Here are the five most common Ketogenic diet mistakes. A traditional Ketogenic diet consists of about 75 percent fat, five percent carbohydrates and 20 percent protein. So, considering the types of fat you consume on this lo Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Craze Exposed

The Ketogenic Diet Craze Exposed

“The Ketogenic Diet” seems to be the new buzzword in the Paleo community this year. Let’s take a look and see what’s going on with this “new” approach. New Word, Similar Diet According to the article “The Beginner’s Guide to the Ketogenic Diet” at Ruled.me, here’s the definition of the ketogenic diet: “A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc.” Diet Doctor goes a bit further and says: “A ketogenic diet, or keto diet, is a very low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many potential benefits for weight loss, health and performance, but also some potential initial side effects.” A Rose by Any Other Name… Let me state the obvious: the ketogenic diet is a new word for roughly the same, old, boring, low-carb diet. Whether you call it ketogenic, Atkins, or very low-carb, ultra Paleo or whatnot, you’re describing an approach that is simply a variation on the same theme. A ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates to create a state of ketosis, where the body must rely on fat and ketone bodies for energy. Recent promoters of the Ketogenic Diet have improved their diet to make it safer, by placing a limit on protein consumption and encouraging the consumption of more plant foods and fewer animal products. But, it’s otherwise the same thing. For example, in most YouTube videos on the subject where people explain what to eat daily on the ketogenic diet, we do not have anything other than a traditional Atkins Diet. In this video, for example, here’s the daily meal plan: Breakfast: four slices of bacon, four whole eggs, chives, and spinac Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

Your diet is perhaps the most important factor controlling your health and well-being. Sure, other factors do play a role, but diet is the linchpin of the incredibly complex human biology. So, if you are trying to get rid of those love handles or get back in shape, a good diet can take your efforts to the next level. But the question is: What is the best diet for weight loss? Well, as it turns out, a ketogenic diet (or keto diet) is one of the most effective nutritional strategies to lose weight and improve overall health. Multiple scientific studies have backed up this notion time and again. Consequently, it is rapidly taking over the health and fitness world and millions of people swear by it. If you are new to the whole ‘keto’ thing, you may have millions of questions swirling in your head. But finding definitive, unbiased and easy to understand answers to them can be difficult. Well, that’s where we come in. In this article, we are going to answer all the questions you may have about keto diet and then some. And while we are at it, we are also going to learn some cool and exciting facts about your body as well. So, let’s get going! Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

a condition in which there is excessive formation of ketones in the body Origin of ketosis Modern Latin from ket(o)- + -osis pl. ke·to·ses, A pathological increase in the production of ketone bodies. Related Forms: ke·tot′ic Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis is an energy state that your body uses to provide an alternative fuel when glucose availability is low. It happens to all humans when fasting or when carbohydrate intake is lowered. The process of creating ketones is a normal metabolic alternative designed to keep us alive if we go without food for long periods of time. Eating a diet low in carb and higher in fat enhances this process without the gnawing hunger of fasting. Let’s talk about why ketones are better than glucose for most cellular fuel needs. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Body Fuel Basics Normal body cells metabolize food nutrients and oxygen during cellular “respiration”, a set of metabolic pathways in which ATP (adenosine triphosphate), our main cellular energy source is created. Most of this energy production happens in the mitochondria, tiny cell parts which act as powerhouses or fueling stations. There are two primary types of food-based fuel that our cells can use to produce energy: The first cellular fuel is glucose, which is commonly known as blood sugar. Glucose is a product of the starches and sugars (carbohydrates) and protein in our diet. This fuel system is necessary, but it has a limitation. The human body can only store about 1000-1600 calories of glucose in the form of glycogen in our muscles and liver. The amounts stored depend on how much muscle mass is available. Men will be able to store more because they have a greater muscle mass. Since most people use up about 2000 calories a day just being and doing normal stuff, you can see that if the human body depended on only sugar to fuel itself, and food weren’t available for more than a day, the body would run Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

(pathology) A metabolic state in which the body produces ketones to be used as fuel by some organs so that glycogen can be reserved for organs that depend on it. This condition occurs during times of fasting, starvation, or while on a ketogenic weight-loss diet. Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet

The Keto Diet

The Ketogenic Diet - also known as a Low Carb High Fat is a high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many benefits such as weight loss, health and physical & mental performance. On a ketogenic diet your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat rather than carbohydrates. Insulin levels become very low and fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access your fat stores to burn them off. Your carb sources should primarily come from vegetables, nuts and diary. All Carbohydrates higher in carb grams must be eliminated from your daily meal consumption to reach “Ketosis”. What is ketosis The “keto” in the word ketosis comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”. This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then consumed as fuel in the body, including by the brain. This is important as the brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose or ketones. It’s a common misconception that the brain needs carbs. The truth is that the brain happily burns carbs when you eat them. But if you don’t eat too many carbs, the brain is happy to burn ketones instead. This is an absolutely necessary function for basic survival. As the body can only store carbs for a day or two, the brain would quickly shut down after a couple of days without food. Alternatively it would quickly have to c Continue reading >>

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