diabetestalk.net

When Is Ketosis Strongest

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

The question a lot of low carb athletes want to get answered to is: “How does a ketogenic diet affect performance?” Secondly: “How to build muscle on keto?” Can you even do it? Well, in my experience, YES you can. Let me give you my story and secrets… When I first heard of nutritional ketosis I didn’t immediately try it out. Being into resistance training, I figured that it couldn’t possibly ever work. Sounds familiar, right? If you’re physically active then you’ve probably been told about the importance of proper nutrition, post-workout glycogen synthesis, recovery, etc. etc. And that you need CARBS to do it. In the athletic community, carbohydrates are being held at the pillar stone of success. But you don’t need them. I’ve never been into this dogmatic belief so eventually, I decided to try out the keto diet. Let’s see what happens and if I lose strength, so be it… I can always get it back. It was meant to be a short experiment, but… After a month of eating less than 30 grams of carbs a day I was in ketosis. I’m not going to lie that some of my performance had suffered, but only temporarily. Other than that, I felt amazing and loved the keto diet. I thought to myself: Why hadn’t I tried it out before? The answer to that was fear of losing my gains – all in vain. I didn’t want to sacrifice the health benefits of low carb and how amazing it made me feel. But I also wanted to regain my performance and continue getting stronger… all while staying on a ketogenic diet. To me, it sounded like a challenge, which I was more than willing to accept My training consists of mainly bodyweight exercises, such as calisthenics, Yoga, and gymnastics. The keto diet is perfect for that and I’ve learned how to build muscle on ketosis. It’s doable Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones For Fat Burn

Exogenous Ketones For Fat Burn

OVERVIEW Exogenous ketones are the newest scientific breakthrough in the world of health and wellness, making the job of achieving ketosis, the state in which the body is burning fat/ketones as fuel rather than glucose, much easier. They come in powder form and are ingested exogenously (a fancy word for outside the body). Exogenous ketones are comprised of beta-hydroxybutyrate salts, which flood your bloodstream with ketones and put the body in ketosis within 30-60 minutes. This means that you can reap all the amazing health benefits of being in ketosis in a simple and effective way (just mix the exogenous ketones with water & drink!). Research is now linking exogenous ketones to a multitude of benefits, including more efficient weight loss, athletic performance enhancement, cancer prevention, cognitive improvement, neuroprotection and anti-inflammatory properties. (See research links below.) In addition, exogenous ketones are an extremely useful tool to easily transition to the ketogenic diet. When taken daily, they can reduce carb/sugar cravings, turn on your fat burners, give you more energy, and keep "low-carb flu" at bay. So bottom line, exogenous ketones are perfect for anyone looking to improve their health and wellbeing. WHY USE THEM Reason #1 - Fat Burning Exogenous ketones for fat burn. Taking exogenous ketones will get you into ketosis quickly. Once your body is done using the exogenous ketones you ingested as fuel, then it will start looking for other places to get ketones from. And lucky for you, ketones are made from the fat stored in your body! So as your body produces more of these ketones as fuel, you end up burning fat. Reason #2 - Energy Our bodies use ketones via our mitochondria to generate energy. They are an alternative fuel source to glucose and Continue reading >>

948: Dr. Adam Nally Is A Family Practitioner Who Champions Ketogenic Diets

948: Dr. Adam Nally Is A Family Practitioner Who Champions Ketogenic Diets

A Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, Board Certified Family Practitioner, and Board Certified Medical Bariatrician utilizing low-carb ketogenic diets with patients named Dr. Adam Nally is our guest today in Episode 948 of “The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show.” Finding a good doctor who understands the key role that nutrition plays in their patient’s health can be extremely challenging nowadays. Since most medical professionals are lucky if they’ve had just a few hours to two weeks worth of education on the role diet plays in health during their medical school training, many don’t know how to adequately help their patients dealing with chronic health problems like diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cholesterol and weight management. These topics are all a passionate focus of attention by a Surprise, Arizona-based family medicine practitioner named Dr. Adam Nally from Nally Family Practice. He blogs about how he routinely uses a low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic diet to help his patients maximize their health where all other forms of traditional medicine has failed. He blogs at DocMuscles.com and is one of the strongest medical proponents of ketogenic diets you’ll ever hear. Dr. Nally was invited by our host Jimmy Moore to be one of the featured speakers on the 2014 Low-Carb Cruise which we shared on this podcast a couple of months back. But the video and audio footage with Dr. Nally became corrupted and unusable. To remedy that, Jimmy invited Dr. Nally to come on the podcast today for a fresh interview that we know you’re gonna love. Listen in as Jimmy and Dr. Nally discuss how the interest in low-carbohydrate nutrition is becoming more attractive to physicians, the surprised response he gets from his patients as he teaches Paleo-based low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic prin Continue reading >>

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

One of the questions people who are new to the LCHF (keto/ketogenic/low carb) diet frequently ask me is: how do I know if I’m in ketosis? What are the main signs of ketosis? Everyone’s different and while some may experience all of the symptoms of ketosis, some might only feel a couple of them. Some feel none at all. There are basic signs and symptoms that indicate that you’re in ketosis. But please note that I’m differentiating between the signs of keto flu (covered in the post I’m linking to) that many experience in the first days of a ketogenic diet, and the feeling of being in ketosis when the flu has subsided: Dry mouth (eat more salt and drink more water to alleviate this). See my keto breath article here. Weight loss. Yay! Metallic taste in your mouth or a strange taste in the back of your throat. Some describe it as fruity or a little sweet. A kind of “buzzing” feeling that’s hard to describe. Almost euphoric at times. Different kind of urine smell, stronger too! “Ketosis breath” – It can range from being a little sweet to being almost like you’ve had a drink of alcohol. Less appetite. You can go for hours without eating and don’t feel very hungry. Increased energy. If you don’t experience it try to eat more fat. Also, drink more water and watch your electrolytes. A ketone strip you pee on shows a positive result. There are also blood ketone meters, or the popular ketone breath test, that give a more specific result. (Pro-tip: If you get the pee strips, cut them in half ) But do note that even with a positive pee strip it’s not 100% certain that you’re in ketosis. A very dark positive result may only indicate that you’re dehydrated. For me personally, the main signs of ketosis are hard to miss. I just feel different! It’s hard Continue reading >>

I Just Started Ketogenic Diet. I'm Losing Weight, But Once I Reach Target Weight, Is There A Way I Can Go Back Into A More Normal Diet That's Not Super High Carb Of Course, But Perhaps A Bowl Of Rice A Day Without Gaining The Weight Back?

I Just Started Ketogenic Diet. I'm Losing Weight, But Once I Reach Target Weight, Is There A Way I Can Go Back Into A More Normal Diet That's Not Super High Carb Of Course, But Perhaps A Bowl Of Rice A Day Without Gaining The Weight Back?

Sure. Paoli et al. did just that in a research study back in 2013. He had participants do 20 days of ketogenic dieting and then transitioned them to a low carb, high protein diet, and then finally had them on a Mediterranean diet – a moderate intake of fats, carbs, and protein for six months. They repeated this process. They found that during the bouts of keto, the participants lost body fat and maintained that loss throughout the transition to the Mediterranean diet. The key to transitioning successfully without gaining body fat – depending on how long you were in ketosis, insulin resistance can be a problem – is to take the transition slow. Meaning, don’t go from ~12 g carbs straight to 200g. Here’s what I’d recommend: One way to do this is is to slowly add 20-30 grams of carbs per week while holding your fat and protein intake where they are, until you’re out of a deficit and back to maintenance. As an example. Let’s assume you end the diet at 1700 calories. And you want to start bringing your calorie intake back up to your new maintenance of 2300 calories. This is how I would do it. If you’re end of diet macros were: 150g protein / 50g carbs/110g fat. Week 1:​ +20 grams carbs/ keep fats as they are / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 70g carbs / 110g fats (1870 calories) Week 2: ​+30 grams carbs/keep fats as they are/ protein stays the same – 150g protein / 100g carbs / 110g fats (1990 calories) Week 3: ​+30 grams carbs/ fat remains the same / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 130g carbs / 110g fats (2110 calories) Week 4: ​+30 grams carbs/ fat remains the same / protein stays the same – 150g protein / 160g carbs / 110g fats (2230 calories) At this point you can either keep things as they are, or start reducing fat intak Continue reading >>

Building Muscle On Keto: Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Building Muscle On Keto: Can You Build Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

He wasn’t overweight, but wanted to lose some fat and gain some muscle while he was at it. And, after reading a bunch of articles, he was convinced that a ketogenic diet was the best way to go about it. Google around for information on ketogenic diets and muscle growth, and you’ll come across the many great and wonderful things that happen when you cut carbs from your diet. Fat will be lost. Muscle will be gained. You’ll recover more quickly, feel less sore, and get stronger faster. Critics of the diet say the exact opposite. Ketogenic diets limit your ability to train hard. Trying to build muscle without carbs is like Batman patrolling the streets of Gotham without his utility belt. There’s absolutely no way, they say, to add muscle while you’re in ketosis. As it turns out, both sides can bring data to the table to support their point of view. SIDE NOTE: If you want a basic overview of the ketogenic diet, as well as more information about the pros and cons, Jeff Cavaliere explains more in the video below. The Ketogenic Diet and Muscle Growth Fans of keto dieting point to research showing that low levels of muscle glycogen don’t have an adverse effect on your performance in the gym [1]. That lifting weights with low levels of muscle glycogen doesn’t impair the anabolic response to resistance exercise [2]. And that the consumption of carbohydrate has no effect on muscle protein synthesis above and beyond the consumption of protein alone [3]. On the other hand, keto critics claim that low carb diets limit your ability to train hard [4]. That lifting weights with low levels of muscle glycogen dampens the post-training anabolic response [5, 6]. And that carbs are anti-catabolic, playing a key role in preventing the breakdown of muscle tissue [7]. Who’s right Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Plan – The Best Fat Burning Diet

Ketogenic Diet Plan – The Best Fat Burning Diet

For the best diet to rapidly burn fat using the body’s natural metabolism, consider a ketogenic diet plan. Nutrition has the strongest effect on the body’s production of important hormones, which regulate metabolism and allow the body to burn fat for energy and retain muscle mass, with little need for excessive exercise. What is a ketogenic diet plan? Basically, it is a diet that causes the body to enter a state of ketosis. Ketosis is a natural and healthy metabolic state in which the body burns its own stored fat (producing ketones), instead of using glucose (the sugars from carbohydrates found in the Standard American Diet – SAD). Metabolically speaking, ketogenic foods are very powerful. The amazing benefit is that these foods are also delicious, natural whole foods that are extremely healthy for you. So what foods are encouraged? Some of the best-tasting, most fulfilling foods are part of this plan, including lean meats like beef and chicken, healthy sources of protein and high-quality fats like eggs, butter, olive oil, coconut oil and avocado. Also, delicious leafy-green vegetables like kale, chard, and spinach, as well as cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower. These foods can be combined with seeds, nuts, sprouts, and a wide range of other amazing foods that lead to incredible health benefits that give your body the protein, healthy fats, and nutrients it needs while providing metabolism-boosting meals for easy cooking at home or on the go. What foods should be limited? On a ketogenic diet plan, the main foods to avoid are those high in carbohydrates, sugars, and the wrong types of fats. These foods can be toxic to the body and create excess glucose levels that the body turns into stored fat. These foods increase the level of insulin Continue reading >>

The Truth About The Ketogenic Diet: Is It The Best Way To Lose Weight?

The Truth About The Ketogenic Diet: Is It The Best Way To Lose Weight?

Whilst it has benefits, is it really the best way to lose weight? You must weigh up this eating approach to see if it's the best decision for you. So allow me to break it down for you to make this decision easy! THE KETOGENIC DIET AND KETOSIS The ketogenic diet involves lowering your carbohydrates extreamly low, putting your fats high and keeping protein adequate, to the point where your body is in a state of what's called ketosis. This is when you burn fats as opposed to carbohydrates for energy. When we eat carbohydrates, the glucose is used to fuel the body and our brain. But when we aren't getting adequate carbohydrates (such as in the ketogenic diet) fats are broken down into glucose instead. This is called gluconeogenesis (neo is greek for "new" and "genesis" means to make). IS THE KETOGENIC DIET BETTER FOR MUSCLE GROWTH AND FAT LOSS? There's some good research into this, including this study (1) that looked at 20 overweight people for 6 weeks on either a ketogenic diet or a moderate carb (non-keto) diet. Both diets had 1500 calories, and the subjects did no exercise. The ketogenic diet consisted of: PROTEIN: 125 CARBS: 33 FAT: 100 The moderate carb diet was: PROTEIN: 117 CARBS: 157 FAT: 50 And what did they find? No significant differences in fat loss. There was no significant difference in fat free mass either. Furthermore, hunger ratings were better for both diets, with no differences found there either. Also, insulin sensitivity was bolsted for both diets, with no differences between them. However, recent research has found to the contrary (2). In this study, 26 college aged resistance trained men were divided into a ketogenic diet (Pro=20 Fat=20 Carb=5) or a tradtional western diet (Pro=20 Fat=25% Carb=55%). These subjects were performing a periodised weight Continue reading >>

Is The Ketosis Diet The Most Powerful Aid For Depression?

Is The Ketosis Diet The Most Powerful Aid For Depression?

The western world is in the grip of a terrible malaise. Depression has been earmarked by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the fastest growing health problem right now and expects it to be that way for many years to come. But why? What gives? Do they know something we don’t? Or is it, in fact, that people just don’t really understand Depression and are blithely wandering into its clutches because they just can’t see it coming? Well, I obviously don’t have all the answers, but I’m going to tell you what I’ve learned over the years with my research into food and health matters. The first piece of information worth considering is the old quote “You are what you eat”. Or the version attributed to the “Father” of Western medicine “Let your food be your medicine and your medicine be your food”. Now, I remember my A-Level chemistry, and I was pretty good at it, and I remember that the bottom line is that you can’t make certain compounds if the ingredients for those compounds are not present in the reaction vessel. Your body is the reaction vessel in this instance, and therefore it stands to reason that if you don’t get enough, say, Iron in your diet, you will find your body exhibiting symptoms which are caused by a lack of Iron. Pretty simple stuff, right? Right. Except that during the whole time that Depression has been becoming the world’s number one disease, the ‘official line’ on dietary recommendations has stressed the importance of not eating too much fat. Low-fat carbs have been the order of the day, and we have probably all seen one version or another of that Special K woman on our screens literally thousands of times. She seems to be doing alright on it… what’s the problem? Well, my money is on the fats. It takes a bit of hea Continue reading >>

Preparing For Ketosis

Preparing For Ketosis

Recently, I wrote about Ketogenic eating. If you’re not sure what it is, go and acquaint yourself there, otherwise, keep on reading. Just like any change in your life, it takes time to adapt, and in this case, particularly for your body. How long does it take to enter Ketosis? As with everything biological, it does vary person to person. It could be as short as three days, or as long as ten. Making sure you keep your carbs under 20g a day in the first week is critical. If you make sure your carbs are that low, and fat is adequately high, you can probably expect to be in Ketosis within five days. As your body needs time to start effectively burning fat again, there will be a few days where you feel sub-par, often referred to as “Keto flu” What’s Ketoflu? And how long does it last? Ketoflu is a sort-of carb detox, your body doesn’t have any carbs left to burn, and isn’t yet great at burning fat, so you’ll feel like you have the flu. How poorly you feel and how long it lasts varies, and it’s best to keep hydrated during this time. Many people have reported relief by drinking broth or stock, as sometimes you can feel very, very flat, from a lack of Sodium and Potassium. Thirst, Hydration, and Salt When you cut out carbs, your body will stop retaining unnecessary water. Due to this, you will lose weight rapidly in the first week. Another effect of this is that you’ll be going to the toilet a lot more, and intaking more water than you probably would on another diet. Because of the increased toilet visits, you’ll be losing minerals from your body, so also try and be mindful of how much salt you’re consuming. Remember, the body is very good at telling you what it needs, if you’re craving salt, you probably need it. Tip: See if you can track down ‘Lite Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Psychosis

Ketosis For Psychosis

What happened when two adults with severe mood and psychotic symptoms for years embarked on a ketogenic diet for weight loss? Yes, they lost weight, but what ELSE happened? Harvard psychiatrist Dr. Chris Palmer shared the inspiring stories of two people in his practice who experienced long overdue relief that even the strongest antipsychotic and mood stabilizing medications could not provide. Read the remarkable results in my newest post on Psychology Today. Continue reading >>

The Nervous System And Metabolic Dysregulation: Emerging Evidence Converges On Ketogenic Diet Therapy

The Nervous System And Metabolic Dysregulation: Emerging Evidence Converges On Ketogenic Diet Therapy

Go to: A link between metabolism and brain function is clear. Since ancient times, epileptic seizures were noted as treatable with fasting, and historical observations of the therapeutic benefits of fasting on epilepsy were confirmed nearly 100 years ago. Shortly thereafter a high fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) debuted as a therapy to reduce seizures. This strict regimen could mimic the metabolic effects of fasting while allowing adequate caloric intake for ongoing energy demands. Today, KD therapy, which forces predominantly ketone-based rather than glucose-based metabolism, is now well-established as highly successful in reducing seizures. Cellular metabolic dysfunction in the nervous system has been recognized as existing side-by-side with nervous system disorders – although often with much less obvious cause-and-effect as the relationship between fasting and seizures. Rekindled interest in metabolic and dietary therapies for brain disorders complements new insight into their mechanisms and broader implications. Here we describe the emerging relationship between a KD and adenosine as a way to reset brain metabolism and neuronal activity and disrupt a cycle of dysfunction. We also provide an overview of the effects of a KD on cognition and recent data on the effects of a KD on pain, and explore the relative time course quantified among hallmark metabolic changes, altered neuron function and altered animal behavior assessed after diet administration. We predict continued applications of metabolic therapies in treating dysfunction including and beyond the nervous system. Keywords: adenosine, epilepsy, glucose, inflammation, long-term potentiation, metabolism, pain, seizure Go to: The Ketogenic Diet and Ketone-Based Metabolism Metabolism influences brain act Continue reading >>

Classic Keto And Modified Ketogenic Diets

Classic Keto And Modified Ketogenic Diets

Frequently asked questions about the Classic and Modified Ketogenic Diets 1. What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet is a special high-fat diet that is used for difficult to treat seizures. Heavy cream, butter, plus, nut and seed oils, provide the necessary fat. The diet also completely eliminates sweets such as candy, cookies, and desserts. Other carbohydrate rich foods such as bread, potatoes, rice, cereals, and pasta are not allowed on the strictest form of the diet, but are allowed on more liberal forms of the diet. All foods must be carefully prepared and weighed on a gram scale. Each meal must be eaten in its entirety for the diet to be most effective. The Classic diet consists of a ratio in grams of fat to non-fat (protein and carbohydrates) of 4:1 and 3:1. The modified ketogenic diet consists of ratios of 2:1 and 1:1. 2. Who can be helped by the diet? People with seiures from infancy through the adult years may be helped by the diet. There is no way to predict beforehand whether it will be successful. Traditionally the diet has been used for children with myoclonic, atonic and tonic-clonic seizures. In every decade since the 1920’s, studies consistently show that 50-75% of infants through adults with difficult to control seizures of all types are helped by the diet. Creative recipes have helped to make the diet more palatable in the past few years. 3. How effective is the diet at controlling or eliminating seizures? Four major meta-analyses (reviews of many studies) have been published in the past 10 years and have determined that the ketogenic diet is effective in reducing seizure frequency in children with difficult-to-control epilepsy. A randomized, controlled study published in 2008 revealed that seizure frequency after 4 months was significantly lo Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

My thoughts on Exogenous Ketones After being contacted (following the Youtube Q&A) by several folks – both members of Ketogains and Internet strangers, I felt compelled to write as fair and even-handed a write-up on exogenous ketone supplementation as I feel can be mustered. I condition my response by saying this – I want to deal only in evidence and hypotheses grounded in biochemistry. I admit up front that this will probably become something of a treatise on what constitutes a well-formulated ketogenic diet. I don’t have the time (or the energy) to put together a document that covers all facets of the use of exogenous ketones in sufficient depth, so what I want to do is to address the folks that I see asking me about them most often – those who have excess body fat, and are looking to lose weight. They have been told about the potential benefits to fat loss via exogenous ketones, and they want to know if the hype is real. Those of you who know me (or read my previous post here) know that I like to respond with “it depends.” So…when the question is raised, “Should I supplement with exogenous ketones?” what do you think my answer will be? Probably not! (HA, I tricked you!)…but let’s explore why. As I’m sure this is going to be hotly debated enough (as the topic is raging in numerous ketogenic groups) there isn’t any value in dealing with speculation that doesn’t have a basis in science, nor in anecdotes. The challenge in dealing with exogenous ketone supplementation is two-fold: One side of the debate has a product to sell. Anytime someone’s livelihood is tied to your purchase of their product, bias and subjective interpretation of the evidence should be considered. The evidence (either for or against) their supplemental use by average schl Continue reading >>

The Ugly Truth About Ketogenic Diets

The Ugly Truth About Ketogenic Diets

Here's what you need to know... Ketosis occurs when carbs are in such low quantities that your body relies almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone metabolism. Ketogenic diets have about 70-75% of your daily caloric intake coming from fat and about 5% from carbohydrates. Ingesting protein above approximately .8 grams per pound is enough to kick you out of ketosis. Ketogenic diets improve body comp, but so does any diet that reduces calories from any source. There is no literature to support that a ketogenic diet is beneficial for promoting increases in muscle mass. Ketogenic diets affect performance negatively. Questions About Ketosis While the ketogenic diet has been used widely and rather effectively in some cases, there's still a lot of confusion about it. What exactly is a ketogenic diet? How does it differ from low carb dieting? Most importantly, at least for the T Nation demographic, is the question of whether ketogenic diets allow you to put on, or at least keep, muscle. Ketosis: What is it? Ketosis is a metabolic state that occurs when dietary carbohydrates are in such low quantities that your body must rely almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone metabolism. That sounds simple on the surface, but let's unpack that explanation a bit. To function, your body requires a substantial amount of energy in the form of ATP. So, let's just assume that the average person uses about 1,800 calories per day to create enough ATP to keep him alive (not including any physical activity). Now this is where it gets interesting. You have this thing in your skull called a brain. It uses about 400 or so calories per day and runs almost exclusively on glucose. (There's some evidence it can use small amounts of fat and lactate, but in the big picture it's not Continue reading >>

More in ketosis