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What To Do After Ketosis

Ketosis Done Right–meet Anne

Ketosis Done Right–meet Anne

Today we have an inspiring real world “n=1” example of how a ketogenic diet can be successfully used by a real woman to easily and happily lose weight! I thought it would be nice to give you all a much-deserved break from my own dietary misadventures and stop to appreciate the beauty of a well-done ketogenic diet. My recent experiment with Professor Seyfried’s dietary recommendations for cancer was one of extreme ketosis for the explicit purpose of cancer treatment. However, most people who decide to try a ketogenic diet do so with the goal of losing weight, and they use a more moderate plan, such as the one recommended by Dr.s Phinney and Volek, in their book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, or the one recommended by Dr. Ron Rosedale in his book The Rosedale Diet. It is this kind of plan I intend to try myself soon, motivated in no small part by my friend Anne, who has successfully applied ketogenic dietary theory to her own life, and who has generously agreed to share her inspirational story here with us. But first, a bit of context. On a beautiful autumn day last October, I was sitting on a beach in picturesque Rockport, Massachusetts with two friends, babbling incessantly about some of the talks I had heard at the 2012 Ancestral Health Symposium, and all the latest things I had been l learning about diet and health, as I am wont to do. Most of my friends and coworkers have learned to deal with this annoying tendency by employing one of two common strategies: Nodding politely and feigning interest, while secretly thinking about far less important things, such as global warming, conflict in the Middle East, and the plight of the piping plover. Disagreeing with my unorthodox dietary philosophies by posing traditional counterarguments, such as “mi Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Is Fasting After Binging An Effective Mitigation?

Ketosis: Is Fasting After Binging An Effective Mitigation?

I've done some experimentation around this, and just fasting is mediocre. Doing the "bulletproof fast" - having the bulletproof coffee as my only calories during on a Monday following an "indulgence" day leads to a better Monday day, but still a tough Monday afternoon. But eating some exogenous ketones (betahydroxy butyrate) in the form of KetoCaNa - Prototype Nutrition in addition to the coffee keeps my energy levels high as my body re-adapts. I will admit, I did those experiments in the order that I described, and so there may have been some other adaptation. It would be good for me to reverse the order of the experiments and test that the pattern is better ascribed to the eating strategies, rather than my adaptation. Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

What's Up With The High-fat Diet Trend—and Does It Work?

If you're looking for the trendiest diet since Paleo, this might be it—only with more fat, way less protein, and virtually zero carbs. The ketogenic diet, which has reportedly been used by celebs like Kim Kardashian and NBA player Lebron James, is a high-fat, low-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that was originally developed to treat epilepsy in children (experts can't say for sure why it reduces the frequency of seizures, but it does seem to work). The whole diet is based on a process called ketosis, which is when your body is so depleted of carbs that your liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies, which can be used as energy, says Tracy A. Siegfried, M.D., medical director at The N.E.W. Program, a bariatric and metabolic weight-loss center in California. The ketones replace carbohydrates as your body’s main energy source, meaning you are running on (and burning) fat. To tell if your body is in a state of ketosis, you can measure your blood or urine for elevated levels of ketones (Ketostix, used to test keto-dieters ketone levels, are available at many pharmacies). If this sounds familiar, it's probably because ketosis is also the goal of the first stage of the Atkins diet. But unlike the keto diet, the Atkins diet aims to get you into a mild state of ketosis and allows for more carbohydrates. In other words, keto is more hardcore. So What the Heck Do You Eat? To get your body to reach ketosis, 80 to 90 percent of the calories you consume should come from fat, and the rest should come from a combo of protein and carbs, says Siegfried. Plus, your carb intake is limited to 10 to 35 grams per day. That's roughly the amount in a single apple, glass of milk, or piece of bread. In fact, it's pretty much impossible to eat fruit or milk-based products without su Continue reading >>

How To Get Back Into Ketosis After Binging On Holiday Carbs

How To Get Back Into Ketosis After Binging On Holiday Carbs

With Christmas and New Years being a time filled with a lots of bread, pasta, cookies, beer, and everyone’s favorite dish, it’s going to be very hard to stick to a ketogenic diet. While it’s completely possible to make keto-approved foods or to stick to the protein and zero carb snacks that you might have, it’s a little unrealistic. Especially if you’re going to a event or a family party, with social pressure not being on your side – there’s a very good chance you’re going to end up eating carbs. Recently, during Christmas, I probably ate at LEAST 400 grams of carbs. Yes, might sound like overkill for some of you but the fact of the matter is, besides the holidays – I’m ALWAYS in ketosis and I’m always a low body fat percentage. This means my body can process carbohydrates quite well. This also means I can get back into ketosis very quickly. The more you practice the ketogenic lifestyle, the easier it is for your body to enter a state of ketosis after being knocked out of it. Anyways, I ate tons of pasta, rice, cake, cookies, a giant italian sub, and drank some beer. The day after, I followed the workout protocol I am about to give you and I was already back to burning ketones the day after. Keep in mind, it might take you just a little longer than me but, there is no doubt in my mind that by following what I am about to tell you, it will be the fastest way for you to get back into ketosis and start burning fats for fuel. Don’t Be Too Hard On Yourself First off, eating a ketogenic lifestyle is exactly what it sounds like – it’s a lifestyle. There’s going to be times where you are 100% ketogenic all the time and feeling great – then there’s going to be times where all you want to do is eat a bowl of pasta or a sandwich. Here’s the thin Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Breaking A Weight Loss Plateau

Breaking A Weight Loss Plateau

I know all about how annoying a low carb diet weight loss plateau can be. In 2008, I began to change my eating habits in order to address some serious health problems. I also wanted to lose the excess weight I had accumulated over the years while eating a poor diet full of processed junk food. It took several years and I still struggle with my weight, but then I'm a work in progress. The Most Common Causes of a Weight Loss Plateau Here is my opinion, born of my individual experience, on the most common causes of a weight loss plateau. If you are following a ketogenic diet, and not losing weight, or the weight loss is inconsistent (going down one week and up the next), here are some of the most common causes: Eating more carbohydrate than you think (fruit, nuts, and yogurt are the particular culprits here). I call this carb creep. Eating more calories than your body can handle without storing (this is usually the result of a very high fat intake - for me, too much dairy). You want to be burning your stored fat, not excess fat from your diet. Eating large amounts of low carb foods that elevate insulin. Dairy protein (hard cheeses, yogurt and whey protein in particular), sugar alcohols, and other artificial sweeteners are culprits here. Eating lots of coconut, coconut oil or MCT oil. Coconut oil has a lot of medium chain triglycerides in it. This type of fat can't be stored, so your body has to burn it first. Again, the goal is to burn your stored fat, not fat from your diet. Not exercising in a way that increases insulin sensitivity to the muscles. (The problem is that for people with a broken metabolism, long, slow exercise doesn't work well - it has to be high intensity exercise, which uses all the glycogen stored in the muscles, and makes them more insulin sensitive. T Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Results | I Lost 30lbs In 6 Weeks

Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Results | I Lost 30lbs In 6 Weeks

My Ketogenic Diet Weight Loss Results Before I talk about the ketogenic diet, I would like to give you a little background about myself. A few years ago I had manage to eat and drink my way up to 280lbs. Even though I have a goofy smile in the picture below, it was a very depressing time in my life. The only thing I was worried about when I got off work was beer and unhealthy foods. I could go to Long John Silver’s and eat eight pieces of fish, eight shrimp, a large box of fries and still look for more food to eat. The last thing on my mind was any type of diet or exercise. I was about 265lbs in the photo below… Uhggg!! Fast forward a few years, I went through a separation and ended up homeless. I decided to quit drinking, start working out and of course, find a job… At the time of this next photo I was about 250lbs and had been sober for two months. I had been working out for about a month, doing a total body workout three days a week. When I would workout, I would do three sets of ten reps per body part. That’s all I remembered from high school when I played football…lol About 250lbs As far as my diet goes, I just did what I was taught in the past about eating healthy. It was basically high carbs, low fats, fruits and veggies. I remembered the old food pyramids back when I was a kid and all I could think of was… “Fat is Bad”… It made sense… Why would I eat fat if I was trying to lose fat? As you notice at the top of the pyramid, Fats and Oils are to be used sparingly. And from looking at the bottom of the pyramid, I can eat all of the bread, rice, cereal and pasta I wanted. So that’s exactly what I did. I was eating tons of bread from sandwiches because most of the deli slices were low fat. I’m talking loads of spaghetti, lasagna, mac and chees Continue reading >>

Getting Back Into Ketosis After Cheating

Getting Back Into Ketosis After Cheating

Falling off the ketogenic wagon never feels great – I’ve been there, done that many times. Especially in the early days. I know that feeling of being disappointed with yourself and frustration at seemingly being back at square one. In those first few months, what would happen to me is I’d have a couple of splendid weeks, where I wasn’t feeling hungry, I could feel my clothes getting looser, and everything was going well. And then, totally unexpectedly, the carb cravings would hit. I’d go through a day or two of feeling this kind of tension and ridiculously insane desire for carbs. I ‘d resist and resist until a part of my brain that didn’t seem to be me would take over, and I’d find myself stood in front of the cupboard with a piece of bread in one hand and a packet of crisps in the other. What then would follow was a 3-day binge on pretty much any carb I could get my hands on. Followed by feeling pissed at myself and fed up at having to start back at the beginning. After the fourth or fifth time of this happening, I decided I had to really figure out what was going on here. Why was I falling off the wagon and how could I make it so that this didn’t happen. Here’s what I realised: First of all, if I was living in a way which meant there was a possibility of ‘cheating’ or ‘falling off the wagon’ – that meant I was essentially on a diet. And I didn’t want to be on a diet. I wanted just to be eating in a way that felt good and satisfying and which also led to weight loss and better health. I didn’t want to be eating in order to get to a destination, I wanted to be living my life now, eating each day in a way that just brought me more and more benefits – physically, mentally and emotionally. Secondly, I wanted to be in a position where if Continue reading >>

In Ketosis But Not Losing Weight? These Foods May Be Stalling Your Progress

In Ketosis But Not Losing Weight? These Foods May Be Stalling Your Progress

Stop Stalling Volume Two: Malignant Mouthfuls Welcome back to the Stop Stalling series! Today, we’re going to take a look at some specific foods that may be causing your stall. These foods may be keeping you from getting ahead. The bad news is that a lot of them may be staples for you. Many of them seem keto-friendly: they’re low in net carbs and should be “safe.” In fact, they are “safe” for plenty of people. However, for some people, certain foods can cause stalls. If you’re in ketosis but not losing weight and have implemented everything advised in Volume 1: Operator Error, here’s a list of the most likely suspects. Dairy: Dairy is a tricky one. First of all, it’s very energy-dense (i.e. it has a lot of calories). That means that it can be really easy to overdo. Alas, keto isn’t magical, and calories still count. Secondly, it’s often a carbohydrate bomb. A glass of milk has about ten grams. It can have more or less depending on the fat content. It can be tough to tell with yogurt: while the actual carb count is probably lower than what is listed on the label (fermentation consumes some of the carbohydrates), you can’t always tell just how many there are. This is even ignoring the fact that many yogurts contain additives, including starch-based thickeners. Finally, dairy is especially prone to “rounding down”: even though many labels say that a serving of cheese contains zero carbohydrates, chances are that a serving contains as many as 0.7 grams. It seems like very little, but if you eat two servings (easy to do!), it’s going to add up over time. Many people rely on dairy, and when they drop it, they start losing again. Seeds and nuts: Seeds and nuts are horrible bastards. I love nuts, especially almonds. Especially the smoked ones or th Continue reading >>

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

Why Cheat Day Works And How To Use It

For those who follow a carb-restricted diet (low-carb, cyclical ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, etc.), introducing a cheat day is not only a way to bring sanity into your meal plans – it is almost a requirement of sorts from a metabolic perspective to ensure that the progress with fat loss does not slow down. It is a bit hard for some people to understand how they can eat whatever they want and still get leaner – so let’s look into how and why it works. What exactly is a “cheat day”? Popularized by The 4 Hour Body book, it’s essentially cyclical strategic refeeding. You pick a day in a week (during which you would otherwise follow a restricted diet) where you allow yourself to consume copious amounts of absolutely anything you want, to your heart’s content. This concept is not new. It has been used for a while by those who followed calorie-restricted diets and allowed themselves one day per week where they would consume more calories than what they estimated their daily requirement was. As you now know, counting calories is a useless task. So we will discuss cheat days purely from the perspective of “carb refeeding”, because the assumption is that during the rest of the week you would be consuming limited amount of carbohydrates. Your total caloric intake during the day is never taken in consideration – only the ratio of different macronutrients. So, why cheat at all? There are many reasons. Pure ketogenic diets (those that strictly restrict any carbs) or diets that at least call for a significant reduction in carbs are psychologically tough. They are extremely effective in achieving the goal you might have in mind (whether it is shedding extra body fat and getting very lean, or using ketone bodies to improve energy levels, cognitive function, Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

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