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What Should My Blood Glucose Be In Ketosis

What Is “nutritional Ketosis”?

What Is “nutritional Ketosis”?

IN A NUTSHELL: Nutritional ketosis is a state of health in which your body is efficiently burning fat as its primary fuel source instead of glucose. When undergoing a ketogenic diet you are essentially converting yourself from a “sugar burner” to a “fat burner”. This is accomplished by reducing your consumption of carbohydrates, increasing your intake of fat, and consuming only an adequate amount of protein to meet your body’s needs. The term nutritional ketosis is claimed to have been coined by Dr. Stephen Phinney & Jeff Volek, two of the leading experts and researchers in the field of low carbohydrate dieting (Check out this informative video to hear a talk from Dr. Phinney). Ketosis is achieved by following a “ketogenic diet” which is high in fat, very low in carbohydrates, and adequate in protein (Please Note: It is “adequate” in protein, NOT “high” in protein. More on this later). By consuming more lipids you are enhancing your body’s fat burning function by up-regulating the enzymes and other “metabolic machinery” needed to burn fat more efficiently, therefore making it easier for your body to tap into stored adipose tissue as an energy source (i.e. you turn yourself into a fat-burning machine!). But don’t we NEED carbohydrates? While it’s true that our red blood cells and a small percentage of brain cells and kidney cells are exclusively glucose dependent, the body can actually GENERATE carbohydrates in a process called gluconeogenesis in which certain non-carbohydrate substrates like proteins (amino acids) and certain constituents of fatty acids (glycerol) can be converted into glucose. The quantities of glucose produced by the body are sufficient to meet the needs of these particular cells and also help to balance the body’s bl Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Blood Sugar Levels

Ketosis And Blood Sugar Levels

Hi all, 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb you will never lose belly fat. healthplus50.com Right now, I'm doing a VLC paleo diet (trying for state of ketosis), and have been testing my blood sugar levels intermittently. I was wondering what the normal blood sugar levels for one in ketosis should be, fasting and post-meal. Before I ate, my blood sugar level was pretty low, around 50 mg/dl, but after my meal it seems to have come up to 120 mg/dl. I did eat a fair amount of high sugar/starch veggies (onions, green peppers) and coconut milk so may have eaten too many carbs. Just trying to make sure I'm not inadvertently sneaking too many carbs into my meals. Thanks! Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Level While In Ketosis

Blood Glucose Level While In Ketosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community New to this so apologies if there is a more dedicated thread. I do not have diabetes, but I am on a ketogenic diet as I am quite obese and this seems to be a good way of life for me. I had my cholesterol and blood glucose levels checked today after being on a LCHF diet for 3 months. Cholesterol was 4.99mmol and glucose level was 1.3mmol. From my reading, 1.3mmol is very low on a "normal diet", and indicates hypoglycemia, but is this to be expected on a keto diet? A bit in the woods and just want to ensure I am not doing something harmful. 1.3mmol is very low, I would suggest you get that checked out - even on LC your liver should ensure you don't go that low, assuming of course you are getting appropriate nutrition to ensure that your liver can produce glucose - get it checked. 1.3mmol is an extremely low glucose level. That surprises me as you'd be feeling very rough at that level. I would confirm that those figures are correct. Glucose at 1.3 mmol/l is usually a severe hypo needing urgent treatment. I think most people would be in a coma, or dead. If they let you out of the surgery then you were obviously neither. defines a hypo as below 4.0. I know many people can go below 4.0 without any symptoms but 1.3 must be wrong! Edit: if you are a non-diabetic on a ketogenic diet you would expect your BG to be in the normal range because all the normal mechanisms should be working. That is what was showing on the device and what was written down on the chart. Feeling 100% so not sure what the deal. May call them and ask them to recheck. Def not in a coma or dead That is what was showing on the device and what was written down on the chart. Feeling 100% so n Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle tissues to store excess glucose as a molecule called glycogen and also reduces glucose production by the liver. When blood sugar is low, the hormone glucagon (produced by alpha-cells in the pancreas) stimulate cells to break down glycogen into glucose that is subsequently released into the blood stream. In healthy people who do not have type II diabetes, these functions allow levels of blood glucose and insulin to stay in a normal range. What Is Insulin Resistance and Why Is It a Problem? Unfortunately, for many Americans and other peopl Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels In Ketosis—part I

Blood Sugar Levels In Ketosis—part I

Welcome to Keto Sister. Summertime for me means that my children are sometimes at summer camp, Vacation Bible School, visiting with friends, or most often home with me. Due to the inconsistency of their schedules, my posts have been inconsistent in recent weeks. Forgive me! The minute school starts again, I can resume weekly posts. Some weeks, my posts may increase to two because I have a lot to say. Over the next two weeks, I want to discuss a topic that effects many of those who follow a ketogenic (keto) diet for different reasons: blood sugar levels. Some encounter high or low blood sugar levels before eating keto, and it is why they decide to reduce carbs in the first place. Others may encounter one of these after being in ketosis for a while. Today I want to introduce a few terms to explain in laymen’s terms what blood sugar is, ideal levels, and what can happen when it is either too high or too low. What is blood sugar and what does it tell us? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), blood sugar is the sugar found in your blood (2017). It comes from the food in our diets and is one of two fuel or energy sources for the body. The body works hard to maintain homeostasis in the blood and does not like anything to be too high or too low. When blood sugar levels are one or the other, the body works to return the level to what appears to be its preference. Because blood sugar levels that were either lower than 81 or higher than 108 miligrams per deciliter correlate with increased risk of death (Balkau et al., 1999), this range is considered ideal for those who eat carbohydrate-based diets. To date, I could find no scientific studies on ideal or even normal blood sugar levels among those on a ketogenic diet, though stu Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Sugar And Ketones

Checking Blood Sugar And Ketones

Checking blood sugar and ketone levels regularly on a restricted ketogenic diet for cancer is an important part of reaching and maintaining the target blood sugar and ketone levels recommended for slowing cancer growth. Here's how to do both, step by step: Getting Started: Calibrate the Ketone and Glucose Meters You'll only need to do this step when you start a new box of ketone or glucose strips. There will be a plastic calibration tool included with the new Ketone strips. Plug the calibration strip into the Ketone meter and wait for it to confirm the calibration numbers. Once that is done, the meter is ready to use. The glucose meter will also have a calibration strip, so if you are starting with a new box, do the same thing with the glucose meter. A separate glucose meter is not required, as the Precision Xtra meter can check both glucose and ketones, but I just happened to already have a glucose meter, so I use it. Now that both meters have been calibrated, we are now ready to take a blood glucose and blood ketone reading. For the glucose test especially, your hands must be clean and dry. Using warm water to wash your hands will make the blood flow better. Since you will be washing your hands and don't want to contaminate them afterwards, get the strips ready first. This will also ensure that the meter doesn't shut off before you can get the strip out and insert it. Open one of the individual ketone strips and take the strip out. You can just place it on top of the meter until you are ready to insert it. Do the same thing with a glucose strip. Using the lancet tool which comes with the Ketone meter, prick your finger and squeeze out a small drop of blood. Now insert the glucose strip into the meter and wait for the indication it is ready to test. Then touch the end Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Ketosis

Blood Sugar And Ketosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community benjo123456 Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member Hi. Sorry about all the questions, but I can't find the answer elsewhere on the internet: What happens to our blood sugar reading if we are in ketosis and adjusted to fat burning? Will it simply settle on a level and then stop there, or will the ketones we produce naturally raise blood sugar levels? usually hovers around 4-5.5mmols BG, sometimes* lower depending on activty anything above <0.3mmol ketones u will be in the start of ketosis diamondnostril Type 1 Well-Known Member Hi. Sorry about all the questions, but I can't find the answer elsewhere on the internet: What happens to our blood sugar reading if we are in ketosis and adjusted to fat burning? Will it simply settle on a level and then stop there, or will the ketones we produce naturally raise blood sugar levels? Blood-sugar levels will generally stay a bit lower than what is considered to be "normal", when in dietary Ketosis. Gluconeogenesis (release of Glycogen from the liver) will keep the blood-sugar levels up to where the body needs them to be, in the absence of much dietary Carbs. The attached file is an excerpt from "The Ketogenic Diet" by Lyle McDonald, a very big and thorough book about the topic. I have found this book extremely useful. If you have lots of questions about the Keto diet then perhaps it's useful to you too? I have the book as a PDF file if you'd like me to send to you. Let me know if so. Continue reading >>

I Need Help. Glucose Levels On Ketosis

I Need Help. Glucose Levels On Ketosis

I am a 33 year old woman diagnosed with Policystic Ovarie Syndrome, which among other things makes me insensitive to my own insulin (pre-diabetic) I have been doing Keto for 3 weeks and my kestostix haven't turned to the lightest shade of pink. I haven't lost any fat. I read an article by Jon Deprospo in which he says that if you are in Ketosis, your blood glucose level should be between 50-60 mg/dl. I checked with my glucometer and found out that my glucose was 86mg/dl. My doctor advised me to stay on Keto, not on CKD (no refeeds) since I am hiperinsulinic. My question is if you are in ketosis, what should your glucose level be?. PD: I wanted to mention that I train with weights everyday (for amost 1 1/2 month) and do 20 minutes cardio everyday. Can you post your diet? Sometimes there are small things that can keep you out of ketosis, and it's a lot easier to learn from other people's experience. My bodyweight is 136 pounds 20%body fat. I started taking 1496 calories intake. 30% protein 10% Carbs 60% Fat. Divided in 5 mini meals / day. I had no progress, so I lowered my calories to 1300/day with the same ratios. Didn't work either. Lowered calories to 1000 and nothing. Last night I changed the ratios to 80% Fat and 20% protein. I am trying to induce ketosis. I just checked my glucose and it is down to 73md/dl (fasting level this morning 71mg/dl ), so I guess that this is helping. As soon as I am sure I am in ketosis I will change the ratios and make sure I am getting enough protein. I know I am not supposed to have less that 1200 calories/day to avoid starvation mode, but since my metabolism is not working properly, I might just give it a try. I am currently taking 1000mcg metformin 3 times/day. 75mcg T-3 (prescribed by my Doctor). I was hoping that you might post up Continue reading >>

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

Is Your Fasting Blood Glucose Higher On Low Carb Or Keto? Five Things To Know

This past spring, after 18 months of great success on the keto diet, I tested my fasting blood sugar on my home glucose monitor for the first time in many months. The result shocked me. I had purchased the device, which also tests ketones, when I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in the fall of 2015. As I embarked on low-carb keto eating, I tested my blood regularly. Soon my fasting blood sugar was once again in the healthy range. I was in optimal ketosis day after day. Not only that, I lost 10 lbs (5 kg) and felt fantastic — full of energy with no hunger or cravings. Before long I could predict the meter’s results based on what I was eating or doing. I put the meter away and got on with my happy, healthy keto life. When my doctor ordered some lab tests this spring, I brought the meter out again. While I had no health complaints, excellent blood pressure and stable weight, she wanted to see how my cholesterol, lipids, HbA1c, and fasting glucose were doing on my keto diet — and I was curious, too. To check the accuracy of my meter against the lab results, on the morning of the test I sat in my car outside the clinic at 7:30 am, and pricked my finger. I was expecting to see a lovely fasting blood glucose (FBG) of 4.7 or 4.8 mmol/l (85 mg/dl). It was 5.8! (103 mg/dl). What? I bailed on the tests and drove home — I didn’t want my doctor warning me I was pre-diabetic again when I had no explanation for that higher result. The next morning I tested again: 5.9! (104). Huh??? For the next two weeks I tested every morning. No matter what I did, my FBG would be in 5.7 to 6.0 (102 to 106 mg/dl), the pre-diabetic range again. One morning after a restless sleep it was even 6.2 mmol/l (113 mg/dl). But my ketones were still reading an optimal 1.5-2.5 mmol/l. I was still burnin Continue reading >>

Doing Keto? Consider Buying A Blood Glucose Meter

Doing Keto? Consider Buying A Blood Glucose Meter

The amount of glucose in your blood at any given time can give you valuable insights into how your body is reacting to the food you eat. If you’re doing a keto-based diet, the data you get from a glucose meter will help you optimize your eating for maximum weight loss! The premise of a keto-based diet is simple: Keep the carbs as low as possible so that your body is forced to get glucose (energy) from fat, rather than carbs. Any sort of glycemic reaction could cause a weight-loss stall for several days. Not sure what a Keto diet is, or want to learn more about it? I talk about what a keto diet is, and the pros and cons of this approach, in this blog article. What is a glycemic reaction? In short, a glycemic reaction is what happens when you eat carbs. It’s a fancy name for an even fancier process. Effectively, when you eat carbs, your body produces a hormone called “insulin” which is responsible for delivering the glucose (the energy from your the carbs you just ate) to the muscle cells in your body. In a keto-based diet, you want to avoid the production of insulin at all costs. Not because insulin itself is bad — but because it means you’ve short-circuited the keto process by eating too many carbs, and allowing your body to get energy from carbs, rather than fat. If this happens, it can take days to “reset” your body back into ketosis. In short, if you are doing a keto-based diet and your blood-glucose levels spike, you screwed up. How to measure your blood glucose level Get yourself a blood-glucose meter!! You can buy a blood-glucose meter from any pharmacy in the $20 to $40 range. The test-strips come in packs of 100 for around $25. (around $0.25 each if you’re bad at math). Here’s a link on Amazon to a glucose meter kit that’s perfectly adequat Continue reading >>

Monitoring Ketone And Blood Glucose Levels On A Low Carb Diet

Monitoring Ketone And Blood Glucose Levels On A Low Carb Diet

By Mary T. Newport M.D. While it is not necessary to measure ketone levels, many people who make the change to a low carb, ketogenic diet and/or use ketone salts would like to have some positive proof that their ketone levels are, in fact, elevated. When transitioning from a higher carb to a low carb, ketogenic type diet, it can take several days to begin to see an increase in ketone levels and the ketone level may continue to rise for two or three weeks before it levels off. The ketone level can fluctuate somewhat throughout the day and can vary considerably from person to person. Using ketone salts, such as Prüvit KETO//OS® or KETO//OS Max, as a supplement can give you a jump start on getting into ketosis and increase ketone levels within 30 to 60 minutes of taking the product. Using coconut oil and MCT oil as part of the diet can help increase and sustain ketone levels as well. There are several ways available to measure ketone levels in urine, blood or by using a breath analyzer. When blood levels of ketones become elevated, the excess ketones will filter out of the blood into the urine. Urine ketone test strips were originally developed for diabetics to help determine if they are going into diabetic ketoacidosis when the blood sugar is elevated. There are a number of companies that sell urine test strips that change color when ketone levels are elevated – usually the deeper the color, the higher the ketone level. This will not tell you what your actual blood ketone level is but can give you a rough idea of whether you are in ketosis or not. However, one of the drawbacks to using urine test strips is that they only measure the ketone acetoacetate and not beta-hydroxybutyrate, which tends to be much more elevated than acetoacetate during ketosis. Also, Prüvit ke Continue reading >>

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

Tracking ketone levels is a large part of success on the ketogenic diet. It helps you know how far you are into ketosis and where we might need to make changes. But did you know that there’s an even better way to step it up a notch? The glucose ketone index is a simple calculation that allows you to find out how ketosis works best for you individually. Without it, you could be in full, high-level ketosis yet still not getting the full benefits. In this post, we’ll be looking at how to easily track your glucose ketone index for different aspects of health along with your ketogenic diet. Basics of the Glucose Ketone Index Here’s what you need to know about the glucose ketone index (GKI): Researchers have used the index in studies on the ketogenic diet, fasting, and more. Additionally, it has been used for tracking changes and progress regarding weight loss, athletic performance, management of metabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and even cancer treatment. Now that we’ve covered the basics of what the GKI does, let’s talk about how you can use tracking it to your advantage. Tracking Your Glucose Ketone Index What’s so special about the glucose ketone index is that it lets you track both glucose and ketones at the same time, taking into account how they work together. It’s a way to know your optimal state for addressing all sorts of health conditions. Tracking this number benefits you over simply measuring ketone levels. That’s because even if you’re deeply in ketosis, you could still have high blood glucose levels that throw things off and affect your health. Essentially, it gives you a more full picture of your metabolic health. The numbers you can expect to target depend on your intentions for being in ketosis. Is your goal weight loss, better overa Continue reading >>

It Really Is In Your Blood: Glucose To Ketone Ratios

It Really Is In Your Blood: Glucose To Ketone Ratios

I wrote awhile back about how I felt that I might be going a little mad obsessing over my blood numbers and measuring my blood glucose and ketone levels. This is one of the greatest differences, in my opinion, between people that follow a ketogenic or low carb lifestyle for overall health reasons or weight loss, and those of us who are experimenting with using a ketogenic approach as a specific disease therapy. I’m using the term “therapeutic ketosis” now for this, as you’ll know if you’re a Constant Reader here at Greymadder. I think people in the first category, with weight loss or general health goals, can definitely be helped by measuring ketones, and that this is vital to the success of the approach. However, in my personal experience using this approach to “starve” my brain tumour, I find I can become quite the data junkie, measuring blood levels of both glucose and ketones up to four times a day, because in my mind, the optimal levels of both are perhaps what’s required to have a therapeutic effect. I base this on the book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease by Dr. Thomas Seyfried, in which he advises that there is a window of effectiveness of therapeutic ketosis for cancer that uses a glucose to ketone ratio of 1.0. This essentially means that when measured in mmol/L (“millimolar”), blood glucose and ketones should be equal, or even achieving ketone levels that are higher than the glucose levels may be preferable. There is general agreement between my favourite go-to references (Ellen Davis, Dominic D’Agostino, Miriam Kalamian, all found in my Resources section) that this glucose to ketone ratio of 1.0 is best. Miriam Kalamian, in her ebook Get Started with the Ketogenic Diet for Cancer further notes that it should not be disregarded that a thera Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

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