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What Lab Values Indicate Dka?

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Prospective Studies May Decrease The Incidence Of Dka In Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Placing newborns in prospective studies to conduct genetic screenings with follow up may reduce the risk of DKA at diagnosis of type 1. Children, particularly those under the age of 5, are at the highest risk of experiencing Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. This may be due to a delay in diagnosis by lack of knowledge of initial symptoms from parents or a misdiagnosis by clinicians with concurrent health issues. Currently, there are mixed data indicating whether DKA is increasing or decreasing in frequency. However, prior studies have shown that providing education on the initial symptoms of type 1 diabetes has shown to reduce the incidence of DKA at diagnosis. This can be seen in children with first-degree relatives who are more knowledgeable in the disease and can recognize initial symptoms. It is also seen in children enrolled in prospective studies for genetic testing of the disease and participating in follow ups. Oulu University Hospital in Finland have ongoing prospective studies since 1995. They have been genetically testing all newborn infants for HLA-conferred susceptibility of type 1 diabetes. One study hypothesized a decreased risk of DKA in c Continue reading >>

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  1. TheCommuter

    You can post this question on this site's Nursing Student Assistance Forums and perhaps get an answer. One of our frequent users, Daytonite, loves to give detailed answers to these types of questions.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f205/

  2. ICRN2008

    Here is the formula for anion gap:
    Agap = Na + K - Cl -CO2
    I would think that the doctor would be monitoring the glucose level (not the agap) to determine when to stop the insulin drip. Anyone else have an idea?

  3. P_RN

    One of our wonderful members Mark Hammerschmidt has a great FREE MICU site:
    http://www.icufaqs.org/
    Check section 4.2
    It's all acidosis/alkalosis

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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What is ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY? What does ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY mean? ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY meaning - ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY definition - ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Adrenal insufficiency is a condition in which the adrenal glands do not produce adequate amounts of steroid hormones, primarily cortisol; but may also include impaired production of aldosterone (a mineralocorticoid), which regulates sodium conservation, potassium secretion, and water retention. Craving for salt or salty foods due to the urinary losses of sodium is common. Addison's disease and congenital adrenal hyperplasia can manifest as adrenal insufficiency. If not treated, adrenal insufficiency may result in severe abdominal pains, vomiting, profound muscle weakness and fatigue, depression, extremely low blood pressure (hypotension), weight loss, kidney failure, changes in mood and personality, and shock (adrenal crisis). An adrenal crisis often occurs if the body is subjected to stress, such as an accident, injury, surgery, or

Management Of A Dka Patient With Severe Metabolic And Ketoacidosis With Chronic Renal Insufficiency Brian Albany Otterbein University, [email protected]

Otterbein University Digital Commons @ Otterbein MSN Student Scholarship Student Research & Creative Work Fall 2014 Follow this and additional works at: Part of the Endocrine System Diseases Commons, Medical Pathology Commons, and the Nursing Commons This Project is brought to you for free and open access by the Student Research & Creative Work at Digital Commons @ Otterbein. It has been accepted for inclusion in MSN Student Scholarship by an authorized administrator of Digital Commons @ Otterbein. For more information, please contact [email protected] Recommended Citation Albany, Brian, "Management of a DKA patient with severe metabolic and ketoacidosis with chronic renal insufficiency" (2014). MSN Student Scholarship. Paper 6. Implications for nursing care Management of a DKA patient with severe metabolic and ketoacidosis with chronic renal insufficiency Brian Albany BSN, CCRN Introduction Case Study References Underlying Pathophysiology Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) serves as one the leading causes of mortality in diabetic patients [14]. The mortality has decreased over the past several decades due to the rapid recognition of the disease state and the improvement of managemen Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. TheCommuter

    You can post this question on this site's Nursing Student Assistance Forums and perhaps get an answer. One of our frequent users, Daytonite, loves to give detailed answers to these types of questions.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f205/

  2. ICRN2008

    Here is the formula for anion gap:
    Agap = Na + K - Cl -CO2
    I would think that the doctor would be monitoring the glucose level (not the agap) to determine when to stop the insulin drip. Anyone else have an idea?

  3. P_RN

    One of our wonderful members Mark Hammerschmidt has a great FREE MICU site:
    http://www.icufaqs.org/
    Check section 4.2
    It's all acidosis/alkalosis

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

https://www.nrsng.com/product/lab-val... Looking for help dominating your nursing Lab Values? Our Lab Values course will show you exactly what you need to know in order to DOMINATE the labs portion of your nursing school and NCLEX exam. FREE Nursing School Cheat Sheets at: http://www.NRSNG.com Tired of professors who don't seem to care, confusing lectures, and taking endless NCLEX® review questions? . . . Welcome to NRSNG.com | Where Nurses Learn . . . Prepare to DEMOLISH the NCLEX. Follow Us::::::::::::::::::::::::: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nrsng/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nrsng Twitter: https://twitter.com/nrsngcom Periscope: @nrsng Snapchat: @nrsngcom Resources::::::::::::::::::::::: Blog: http://www.NRSNG.com Cheat Sheets: http://www.nrsng.com/freebies Apps: http://www.RNcrush.com | http://www.Simclex.com Books: http://www.NursingStudentBooks.com Nursing Student Toolbox: http://www.NRSNG.com/toolbox MedMaster Course: http://www.MedMasterCourse.com Visit us at http://www.nrsng.com/medical-informat... for disclaimer information. NCLEX®, NCLEX-RN® are registered trademarks of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, INC. and hold no affiliation with

Common Laboratory (lab) Values - Abgs

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Laboratory VALUES Home Page Arterial Blood Gases Arterial blood gas analysis provides information on the following: 1] Oxygenation of blood through gas exchange in the lungs. 2] Carbon dioxide (CO2) elimination through respiration. 3] Acid-base balance or imbalance in extra-cellular fluid (ECF). Normal Blood Gases Arterial Venous pH 7.35 - 7.45 7.32 - 7.42 Not a gas, but a measurement of acidity or alkalinity, based on the hydrogen (H+) ions present. The pH of a solution is equal to the negative log of the hydrogen ion concentration in that solution: pH = - log [H+]. PaO2 80 to 100 mm Hg. 28 - 48 mm Hg The partial pressure of oxygen that is dissolved in arterial blood. New Born – Acceptable range 40-70 mm Hg. Elderly: Subtract 1 mm Hg from the minimal 80 mm Hg level for every year over 60 years of age: 80 - (age- 60) (Note: up to age 90) HCO3 22 to 26 mEq/liter (21–28 mEq/L) 19 to 25 mEq/liter The calculated value of the amount of bicarbonate in the bloodstream. Not a blood gas but the anion of carbonic acid. PaCO2 35-45 mm Hg 38-52 mm Hg The amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in arterial blood. Measured. Partial pressure of a Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. TheCommuter

    You can post this question on this site's Nursing Student Assistance Forums and perhaps get an answer. One of our frequent users, Daytonite, loves to give detailed answers to these types of questions.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f205/

  2. ICRN2008

    Here is the formula for anion gap:
    Agap = Na + K - Cl -CO2
    I would think that the doctor would be monitoring the glucose level (not the agap) to determine when to stop the insulin drip. Anyone else have an idea?

  3. P_RN

    One of our wonderful members Mark Hammerschmidt has a great FREE MICU site:
    http://www.icufaqs.org/
    Check section 4.2
    It's all acidosis/alkalosis

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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