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What Is Uncompensated Metabolic Acidosis?

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asth

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [ 1 ] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis , Metabolic Acidosis , and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis .) Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 Continue reading >>

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  1. Ralph

    yes you read right..
    HONEY
    the bad stuff with a lot of net carbs and sugars.
    but let's start at the beginning..
    i am with atkins for 1.5 years now and lost 17 kg in a year, just to try lifetime atkins and going a bit too far with the daily calories and gain 10kg again in a few months..
    i am without flour, sugar and starches for a longer time (about 4 years now) and lost 40 kg altogether, needed atkins for the rest of it though.
    i'm at 86 kg right now, started with 120 kg 4 years ago and was down to 78 kg.
    so the time had come to start over again, but this time not with phase 1 and 20 net carbs, because i couldn't stay with that anyway, i was always starved out, headaches, no voice when speaking to other people, no power, exhausted and tired all the time. so this time it's the new 40 carbs max (20-25g carbs from vegetables and stuff and 17g of carbs from honey).
    then i read about loosing weight with honey and how honey would burn fat.
    well i guess you get a big "that won't work with atkins because of the sugars! it will block the ketose!".. but wait..
    here's the plan that has been worked out in a lot of studies, there are books about it, i just ordered them and will read more about that and try it out longer.
    but so far it works very good for me.
    plan is simple: 1 Tablespoon (21g) of pure organic non-produced and cold fabricated honey just before sleeping.
    the fructose will be stored in your liver over night, and that's where the magic happens.
    burning fat needs glucose to work, in other words ketose only works with carbs. not sugary carbs, but carbs, in the end all carbs are converted to glucose anyway, and where does fat burning happen ? in your liver, where too much fructose also gets converted to fat!
    the trick is to stay low carb all day, up to 20g carbs (not net carbs) and fuel your fat burning liver with fructose just before going to bed so it has enough fuel to really burn a lot of fat through the night, when about 70 % of the fat burning takes place.
    the glucose in honey is low glycemic (index of 20 on the blood sugar and insuline) so you don't need to be frightened, it won't stop your ketose, 21g of honey is 6.3g of low glycemic glucose, 8.4g of fructose that gets stored in your liver and converted to glucose to fuel ketose over night and not converted to fat (you would need full glycogen tanks in your body, thats about 70g of fructose and 130g of glucose, but with atkins, they are emptied) and 2.1g of polysaccharides (low glycemic glucose).
    your body burns about 4g of glucose per hour minimum (even if you're on low carb, it will build 4g of glucose from protein then), so with a total of 16.8g sugar your body will have empty glucose tanks in the morning and will have burned about 7.5g-9g of fat per hour also. that's about 66g of fat per 8 hour sleep, 462g of fat in a week just by sleeping with a tblsp of honey.
    without honey the ketose will not work that well, you will still burn fat, but not that amount because ketose needs glucose, and your body will need to get it from somewhere. you can drink a protein drink before bed, but converting protein to glucose will take time and it will spread all over your body and not specifically in your liver where the fuel is needed for ketose. so you will have less power for ketose and burn less fat than with honey.
    i tried this for a week now and works really good. i lost 2kg (a good 4 lbs) in just 3 days (i know a lot of it is water at the start), but so far it does not interfere with atkins and the low carb function of your body. you won't loose your atkins advantage.
    i'll look how this goes on and will read the books written on this topic my Mike McInnes in the next weeks, but honey at night won't make you crave for carbs while you're sleeping and it doesn't anyway because it's low glycemic and doesn't raise your blood sugars with a tblsp (21g), at least it doesn't for me and it's known not to.
    just make sure you stay away from produced honey, that's just glucose fructose syrup, nothing more, stripped of all vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, hormones, enzymes, and the molecule structure that makes it low glycemic.
    just wanted to share this with you.
    maybe someone here already has experience with all organic honey and atkins ?
    [ed. note: Ralph (1506227) last edited this post 2 years, 4 months ago.]

  2. Ellen

    Honey is sugar...period
    If glucose is needed to burn fat, since all carbs are turned to glucose, it wouldn't matter whether it was honey or anything else...and the idea of low carb is that glycogen stores are used up forcing the body to turn to fat for fuel. Honey will replenish glycogen stores in the liver (and muscles if you have enough) and the body will turn to this first as a fuel source.
    It's unlikely to take you out of ketosis because you aren't having enough. One tbsp contains around 17g carbs. Added to 20g a day on Atkins takes you to mless than 40. Most people will stay in ketosis under 40.
    4lbs is not unusual in three days at the start, so basically what you are doing is staying below 40 carbs which will take you into ketosis, losing water at the beginning g which you do on Atkins anyway, But instead of spending your carbs on wholesome food which keeps you satisfied (which you ncoukdnt have been doing the first time round or you woukdnt have been hungry, - and the other symptoms you describe are classic salt depletion symptoms) you are choosing to spend half your daily carb intake on sugar.
    No, sorry, not convinced.
    [ed. note: Ellen (172174) last edited this post 2 years, 4 months ago.]

  3. James

    Hi Ralph welcome to the forum and congratulations on your huge weight loss.
    I have to say though that my experience on phase 1 with 20 g carbs a day has not been exhausting. I do eat about 450 g of greens and atkins freindly veg a day though . and put salt in food as well.
    the honey thing sounds interesting though . keep us posted . It would be nice to have a tablespoon of honey at night though , especially on some greek yohgurt with nuts.

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http://bit.ly/1HjUiAOUncompensated Metabolic Acidosis, um weitere Informationen ber Uncompensated Metabolic Acidosis, klicken Sie bitte aufhttp://bit.ly/1HjUiAO

Uncompensated Acidosis | Definition Of Uncompensated Acidosis By Medical Dictionary

Uncompensated acidosis | definition of uncompensated acidosis by Medical dictionary Related to uncompensated acidosis: acidotic , acidemia an acidosis in which the pH of body fluids is subnormal, because restoration of normal acid-base balance is not possible or has not yet been achieved. a pathological condition resulting from accumulation of acid or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate content) in the blood and body tissues, and characterized by increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in pH). The optimal acid-base balance is maintained by chemical buffers, biological activities of the cells, and effective functioning of the lungs and kidneys. The opposite of acidosis is alkalosis . It is rare that acidosis occurs in the absence of some underlying disease process. The more obvious signs of severe acidosis are muscle twitching, involuntary movement, cardiac arrhythmias, disorientation and coma. a condition in which the compensatory mechanisms have returned the pH toward normal. a metabolic acidosis produced by accumulation of ketones in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. may result from administration of drugs, such as urinary acidifiers, or anesthetic agents which Continue reading >>

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  1. Alisonjane10

    Hello folks
    I've been following a low carb diet, moderate fat intake for 2 months now. After asking tons of questions on this marvellous forum, I've learnt how this way of eating works. Via testing, I know I am consistently in nutritional ketosis. I am currently losing about a 1LB a day in weight...which is great. But, is it normal? I'm aware other members have achieved huge weight loss whilst eating LCHF. But I'm unsure of the overall timescale. Recent blood screening shows I don't have thyroid problems. All advice gratefully received.
    Ali. X

  2. jack412

    do you want to slow it down?
    how are you feeling, do you see any diet like symptoms?
    how much more weight do you want to lose?
    it is a lot a week and twice that is recommended
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KYYnEAYCGk

  3. AndBreathe

    Alisonjane10 said: ↑
    Hello folks
    I've been following a low carb diet, moderate fat intake for 2 months now. After asking tons of questions on this marvellous forum, I've learnt how this way of eating works. Via testing, I know I am consistently in nutritional ketosis. I am currently losing about a 1LB a day in weight...which is great. But, is it normal? I'm aware other members have achieved huge weight loss whilst eating LCHF. But I'm unsure of the overall timescale. Recent blood screening shows I don't have thyroid problems. All advice gratefully received.
    Ali. X
    Click to expand... So, in two months you have lost 4 stones? At the outset, how much did you have to lose, and how close are you now to your target?

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Uncompensated Metabolic Acidosis: An Underrecognized Risk Factor For Subsequentintubation Requirement.

Uncompensated metabolic acidosis: an underrecognized risk factor for subsequentintubation requirement. Daniel SR(1), Morita SY, Yu M, Dzierba A. (1)University of Hawaii School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813, USA. BACKGROUND: There are no published reports identifying an inadequate ventilatory response to metabolic acidosis as a predictor of impending respiratory failure.Metabolic acidosis should induce a respiratory alkalosis in which the partialpressure of carbon dioxide (Paco2) is (1.5 [HCO3-] + 8) +/- 2. This studyexamined the relation between inadequate ventilatory compensation and intubation among trauma patients.METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for trauma patients admitted between January 1999 and December 2000. Age, gender, Injury Severity Score andcombined Trauma and Injury Severity Score, chest injury, history of cardiac orpulmonary disease, partial pressure of oxygen (Pao2), Paco2, Glasgow Coma Score, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, base deficit, and ability tocompensate were analyzed with respect to intubation and need for ventilatorsupport.RESULTS: Of 140 patients with metabolic acidosis, 45 ultimately were intu Continue reading >>

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  1. test_positive

    I am recently diagnosed Type 2 and my doctor has prescribed me metformin. I read the leaflet and it says not to have alcohol while on this medication. As I expect to be on this for life this means no more alcohol. Ever again. :thumbdown:
    I don't drink much. My wife and I have perhaps one (small) glass of wine per week. But we really enjoy it.
    Does anyone have experience of this? Should I really stop drinking completely now I'm on metformin? The leaflet says "Alcohol may increase the risk of lactic acidosis especially if you have liver problems or if you are undernourished." I do not have liver problems and am not undernourished.
    Thank you for any guidance you can provide!

  2. Grazer

    You will be fine with alcohol on metformin providing you're not a chronic heavy drinker or have existing liver disease. Lactic acidosis is EXTREMELY rare and occurs in combination with those two conditions. Metformin never stops me from enjoying my Rioja! Go and enjoy.

  3. Paul1976

    Good advice from sheepy above!..Incedently there's some good half price offers on Rioja at Tesco at the moment! :thumbup:

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