diabetestalk.net

What Is The Significance Of Kussmaul Respirations In Ketoacidosis?

What Can Cause Kussmaul Breathing & How Is It Treated?

What Can Cause Kussmaul Breathing & How Is It Treated?

Kussmaul Breathing is the name given to a condition in which the patient develops an extremely deep and labored breathing pattern. This is seen mostly in people who are diabetic and have severe forms of metabolic acidosis, especially diabetic ketoacidosis with kidney dysfunction. Kussmaul Breathing can also be explained as a form of hyperventilation which is a condition in which an individual breathes in such a deep pattern that the level of carbon dioxide decreases in the blood, which is seen mostly in metabolic acidosis where the breathing becomes extremely fast and shallow and as the condition worsens the breathing becomes shallow and deep and it looks as if the individual is virtually gasping for breath. This type of breathing in which the individual is virtually gasping for air is what is termed as Kussmaul Breathing. Kussmaul Breathing is a condition which results due to low levels of carbon dioxide in the blood. It is normally seen in people who have uncontrolled diabetes to level where they develop diabetic ketoacidosis resulting in the patient to have a very shallow and deep breathing. The carbon dioxide level decreases due to the desire of the individual to take a deep breath and exhale more amount of carbon dioxide than the norm resulting in a marked decrease in the level of carbon dioxide in the blood causing hyperventilation or Kussmaul Breathing. The conditions which can cause Kussmaul Breathing are: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a condition in which the glucose present in the blood is not able to be used by the body to produce energy because of severe need for insulin which is not there. This results in the inability of the body to get rid of the glucose to produce energy for the body. Metabolic Acidosis: This is a medical condition in w Continue reading >>

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Tweet The respiratory system is the system of organs that allow the body to take in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide, this process is known as gaseous exchange. We generally breathe between 12 and 20 times a minute. There are a number of complications of diabetes that can negatively affect our breathing. Parts of the respiratory system The following parts of the body make up the respiratory system: Mouth and nose Trachea (windpipe) Lungs Diaphragm How the respiratory system works Breathing is usually initiated by contraction of the diaphragm, a muscle which separates the chest cavity from the abdomen. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing, Cheyne-stokes Respiration & Biot's Respiration Terms

Kussmaul Breathing, Cheyne-stokes Respiration & Biot's Respiration Terms

Technical Terms for Respiration There are several weird-sounding terms related to respiration that seem harder to understand than they really are. Actually, their definitions may vary just a bit depending on setting: academic or practical. These are Kussmaul's respiration, Cheyne-Stokes respiration, and Biot's (or Bee-oh's) respiration. It all sounds kind of technical and a bit out there, but, by the end of this lesson, you'll be a pro at explaining what these are. Kussmaul's Respiration There are different medical conditions that can affect the acid/base balance in your body, meaning your body can become more acidic or basic. When a person is acidotic, that is to say they are undergoing a pathological process (known as acidosis) that leads to acidemia, an abnormally low pH of the blood, they may experience Kussmaul's respiration. Kussmaul's respiration, as German physician Adolph Kussmaul himself described, is technically deep, slow, and labored breathing, which we now know is in response to severe acidemia stemming from metabolic acidosis. However, nowadays, it is sometimes used to describe rapid and shallow breathing patterns in cases of less severe acidemia as well. Why does this type of breathing pattern occur? Well, what do you breathe in? Oxygen, right? What do you breathe out? Carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is acidic. It lowers the pH of the blood. By breathing rapidly and/or deeply, the body tries to blow off excess CO2 to increase pH back to normal, like an old train engine tries to blow off steam to cool itself off. Such respiration can be seen in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis or renal (that is to say, kidney) failure among other problems. Cheyne-Stokes Respiration The next form of respiration I want to get to is a bit more difficult to understand, but Continue reading >>

Understanding The Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding The Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) must be considered while forming a differential diagnosis when assessing and managing a patient with an altered mental status. This is especially true if the patient has a history of diabetes mellitus (DM). However, be aware that the onset of DKA or HHNS may be the first sign of DM in a patient with no known history. Thus, it is imperative to obtain a blood glucose reading on any patient with an altered mental status, especially if the patient appears to be dehydrated, regardless of a positive or negative history of DM. In addition to the blood glucose reading, the history — particularly onset — and physical assessment findings will contribute to the formulation of a differential diagnosis and the appropriate emergency management of the patient. Pathophysiology of DKA The patient experiencing DKA presents significantly different from one who is hypoglycemic. This is due to the variation in the pathology of the condition. Like hypoglycemia, by understanding the basic pathophysiology of DKA, there is no need to memorize signs and symptoms in order to recognize and differentiate between hypoglycemia and DKA. Unlike hypoglycemia, where the insulin level is in excess and the blood glucose level is extremely low, DKA is associated with a relative or absolute insulin deficiency and a severely elevated blood glucose level, typically greater than 300 mg/dL. Due to the lack of insulin, tissue such as muscle, fat and the liver are unable to take up glucose. Even though the blood has an extremely elevated amount of circulating glucose, the cells are basically starving. Because the blood brain barrier does not require insulin for glucose to diffuse across, the brain cells are rece Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing

Kussmaul Breathing

Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Related to Kussmaul breathing: Biot's breathing Kussmaul breathing abnormally deep, very rapid sighing respirations characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis. Kussmaul breathing Air hunger Clinical medicine Rapid, deep respiration 2º to stimulation of the respiratory center of the brain triggered by ↓ pH, normal during exercise, and common in Pts with severe metabolic acidosis–eg, DKA. See Metabolic acidosis, Diabetes. breathing (breth'ing) abdominodiaphragmatic breathing A controlled method of breathing in which the diaphragm is used for inspiration and the abdominal muscles for expiration. This technique improves exertional dyspnea, esp. in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Synonym: diaphragmatic breathing apneustic breathing An abnormal breathing pattern marked by prolonged inspiration followed by an inspiratory pause. This is usually associated with brainstem injuries. assisted breathing Any technique that improves respiration. Such breathing includes the provision of supplemental oxygen, bag-valve-mask ventilation, noninvasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation, and mouth-to-mouth ventilation. asthmatic breathing Harsh breathing with prolonged wheezing heard throughout expiration. ataxic breathing An irregular, uncoordinated breathing pattern common in infants. belly breathing Abdominal respiration. Biot breathing See: Biot breathing bronchial breathing Bronchial sounds. Cheyne-Stokes breathing See: Cheyne-Stokes respiration continuous positive-pressure breathing A method of mechanically assisted pulmonary inflation. A device administers air or oxygen to the lungs under a continuous pressure that is always greater than zero. Synonym: continuous positive-pressure ventilation diaphragmat Continue reading >>

[ketoacidotic Diabetic Metabolic Dysregulation: Pathophysiology, Clinical Aspects, Diagnosis And Therapy].

[ketoacidotic Diabetic Metabolic Dysregulation: Pathophysiology, Clinical Aspects, Diagnosis And Therapy].

Abstract When glucose utilisation is impaired due to decreased insulin effect, ketones are produced by the liver from free fatty acids to supply an alternate source of energy. This adaptation may be associated with severe metabolic acidosis and tends to occur in patients with type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. In addition, hypovolemia is an almost invariable finding with marked hypoglycemia and is primarily induced by the associated glucosuria. Ketoacidosis stimulates both the central and peripheral chemoreceptors controlling respiration, resulting in alveolar hyperventilation (Kussmaul's respiration). With the ensuing fall in pCO2 the patient tries to raise the extracellular pH. A fruity odor of acetone on the patient's breath sometimes suggests that ketoacidosis is present. The classical triad of symptoms associated with hyperglycemia are polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss. Circulatory insufficiency with hypotension is not uncommon due to the marked fluid loss and acidemia. In more severely affected patients, neurologic abnormalities may be seen, including lethargy, seizures or coma. Some patients also have marked vomiting and abdominal pain. The history and physical examination may provide important clues to the presence of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Once suspected, the diagnosis can be easily confirmed by measuring the plasma glucose concentration. Glucosuria and ketonuria can be semiquantitatively detected with reagent sticks. Blood gas analysis and anion gap give objective information as to the severity of the metabolic acidosis. Therapy must be directed toward each of the metabolic disturbances: hyperosmolality, ketoacidosis, hypovolemia and potassium, and phosphate depletion. The mainstays of therapy are the administration of low-dose insulin Continue reading >>

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

People with diabetes mellitus, especially type 1 diabetes and rarely in type 2 diabetes, tend to burn fatty acids which brings changes in the breathing patterns. Apart from diabetes, other forms of metabolic acidosis also result in Kussmaul breathing . The breathing is usually involuntary, in an effort by the body to get rid of unnecessary acids. Read on to find out more about Kussmaul breathing . In type 1 diabetics, when the body runs out of insulin or is not provided with enough insulin (especially during the times of excessive physical activity), it starts to burn fatty acids to produce energy. Burning fatty acids produces ketones as waste products which are released into the blood stream increasing the acidity of the blood (diabetic ketoacidosis). If the kidneys fail to discharge this excess acids through urine or if there is too many of acid units than the kidneys can process, the only way the body can reduce acidity is through respiration. In the beginning the breathing pattern is usually rapid, short, and shallow, and as the acidosis progresses it becomes slow, deep, and long to exhale the acids. This is similar to hyperventilation with characteristics of air hunger and results in a decrease in partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate levels in the blood. The reason behind this abnormal breathing pattern is differentiated by the presence of high blood sugar levels from other forms of ketoacidosis. The presence of high blood sugar levels indicates diabetic ketoacidosis. In less severe cases of metabolic acidosis or diabetic ketoacidosis, the breathing usually comes back to normal when the blood’s composition becomes normal. Severe cases of acidosis along with this type of breathing can lead to coma. If you find yourself or someone you know suffering f Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing

Kussmaul Breathing

What is Kussmaul Breathing? Kussmaul Breathing is the term given to a condition in which the patient builds up an extremely deep and difficult breathing pattern. This is seen mostly in individuals who are diabetic and have severe forms of metabolic acidosis, particularly diabetic ketoacidosis with kidney dysfunction. Kussmaul Breathing can likewise be clarified as a type of hyperventilation which is a condition in which an individual breathes in such a deep pattern, to the point that the level of carbon dioxide reduces in the blood, which is seen for the most part in metabolic acidosis where the breathing turns out to be more quick and shallow and as the condition exacerbates the breathing gets to be distinctly shallow and profound and it looks as though the individual is virtually gasping for breath. This kind of breathing in which the individual is essentially gasping for air is what is named as Kussmaul Breathing. Kussmaul’s Respiration There are diverse medical conditions that can influence the basic/acidic balance in your body, which means your body can turn out to be more basic or acidic. At the point when a man is acidotic, that is to say they are experiencing a pathological process (known as acidosis) that prompts to acidemia, an abnormal low pH of the blood, they may experience Kussmaul’s respiration. Kussmaul’s respiration, as German doctor Adolph Kussmaul himself portrayed, is in fact profound, slow, and labored breathing, which we now know is because of serious acidemia coming from metabolic acidosis. Nonetheless, these days, it is now and again used to portray shallow and rapid breathing examples in instances of less severe acidemia too. Reasons for this breathing pattern happening All things considered, what do you take in? Oxygen, isn’t that so? W Continue reading >>

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Acute hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, may be either the initial presentation of diabetes mellitus or a complication during the course of a known disease. Inadequate insulin replacement (e.g., noncompliance with treatment) or increased insulin demand (e.g., during times of acute illness, surgery, or stress) may lead to acute hyperglycemia. There are two distinct forms: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), typically seen in type 1 diabetes, and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), occurring primarily in type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, no insulin is available to suppress fat breakdown, and the ketones resulting from subsequent ketogenesis manifest as DKA. This is in contrast to type 2 diabetes, in which patients can still secrete small amounts of insulin to suppress DKA, instead resulting in a hyperglycemic state predominated simply by glucose. The clinical presentation of both DKA and HHS is one of polyuria, polydipsia, nausea and vomiting, volume depletion (e.g., dry oral mucosa, decreased skin turgor), and eventually mental status changes and coma. In patients with altered mental status, fingerstick glucose should always be checked in order to exclude serum glucose abnormalities. Several clinical findings pertaining only to DKA include a fruity odor to the breath, hyperventilation, and abdominal pain. HHS patients, in contrast to those with DKA, will present with more extreme volume depletion. The treatment of both DKA and HHS is primarily IV electrolyte and fluid replacement. Insulin for hyperglycemia may be given with caution and under vigilant monitoring of serum glucose. Other treatment options depend on the severity of symptoms and include bicarbonate and potassium replacement. Osmotic diuresis and hypovolemia Hypovolemia resulting from DKA can lead to acute Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

The hallmark of diabetes is a raised plasma glucose resulting from an absolute or relative lack of insulin action. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Near-complete lack of insulin will result in diabetic ketoacidosis, which is therefore more characteristic of type 1 diabetes, whereas partial insulin deficiency will suppress hepatic ketogenesis but not hepatic glucose output, resulting in hyperglycaemia and dehydration, and culminating in the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. Hyperglycaemia is characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly in the previously undiagnosed, but it is the acidosis and the associated electrolyte disorders that make this a life-threatening condition. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Pathogenesis of DKA and HHS Insulin is a powerful anabolic hormone which helps nutrients to enter the cells, where these nutrients can be used either as fuel or as building blocks for cell growth and expansion. The complementary action of insulin is to antagonise the breakdown of fuel stores. Thus, the relea Continue reading >>

Clinical Profile Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Prospective Study In A Tertiary Care Hospital

Clinical Profile Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Prospective Study In A Tertiary Care Hospital

Clinical Profile of Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Prospective Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital 1Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, India. 2Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, India. 3Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, India. NAME, ADDRESS, E-MAIL ID OF THE CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Harpreet Kaur, Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana-141001, India. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2014 Jan 21; Revisions requested 2014 May 16; Accepted 2015 Apr 9. Copyright 2015 Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetic ketoacidosis, a well-known and major acute metabolic complication classically occurs in young patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it may occur in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus too. Aim of this study was to look into the clinical profile, precipitating factors and clinical outcome in the patients presenting with Diabetic ketoacidosis in the Emergency of a Tertiary care hospital. The study was a prospective study conducted over a period of two years in Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Karnataka, India. Clinical profile of 60 diabetic patients admitted in the Emergency with the diagnosis of Diabetic ketoacidosis were analysed. Out of 60 patients, 12 were of Type 1 and 48 were Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Mean duration of diabetes was 8.65 years. Only 14 (23.3%) patients were taking regular treatment for Diabetes Mellitus whereas 32 (53.33%) patients were on irregular treatment and eight (13.33%) were not on any treatment at all. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetes mellitus is the name given to a group of conditions whose common hallmark is a raised blood glucose concentration (hyperglycemia) due to an absolute or relative deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin. In the UK there are 1.4 million registered diabetic patients, approximately 3 % of the population. In addition, an estimated 1 million remain undiagnosed. It is a growing health problem: In 1998, the World Health Organization (WHO) predicted a doubling of the worldwide prevalence of diabetes from 150 million to 300 million by 2025. For a very tiny minority, diabetes is a secondary feature of primary endocrine disease such as acromegaly (growth hormone excess) or Cushing’s syndrome (excess corticosteroid), and for these patients successful treatment of the primary disease cures diabetes. Most diabetic patients, however, are classified as suffering either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for around 15 % of the total diabetic population, is an autoimmune disease of the pancreas in which the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas are selectively destroyed, resulting in an absolute insulin deficiency. The condition arises in genetically susceptible individuals exposed to undefined environmental insult(s) (possibly viral infection) early in life. It usually becomes clinically evident and therefore diagnosed during late childhood, with peak incidence between 11 and 13 years of age, although the autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction begins many years earlier. There is currently no cure and type 1 diabetics have an absolute life-long requirement for daily insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes: around 85 % of the diabetic population has type 2 diabetes. The primary prob Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Kussmaul Breathing - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Nicholas J. White, in Manson's Tropical Infectious Diseases (Twenty-third Edition) , 2014 Hyperventilation or Kussmaul's breathing (sometimes termed respiratory distress) is a poor prognostic sign in malaria. In the tachypnoea associated with high fever, breathing is shallow compared with the ominous laboured hyperventilation associated with metabolic acidosis, pulmonary oedema or bronchopneumonia. Acute pulmonary oedema (acute respiratory distress syndrome) may develop at any time in severe falciparum malaria. It is particularly common in pregnant women, but rare in children. In some cases malaria ARDS may be difficult to distinguish clinically from pneumonia. The heart sounds are normal. The central venous pressure and pulmonary artery occlusion pressures are usually normal, the cardiac index is high and systemic vascular resistance is low. This points to an increase in capillary permeability (unless the patient has been overhydrated). The chest radiograph shows increased interstitial shadowing and a normal heart size. Julian L. Seifter, in Goldman's Cecil Medicine (Twenty Fourth Edition) , 2012 Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, anorexia, polydipsia, and polyuria. Patients often exhibit Kussmaul respirations and volume depletion. Neurologic symptoms include fatigue and lethargy with depression of the sensorium. CSF exhibits a change in acid-base status with treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Even without bicarbonate administration, CSF pH falls as a result of the ventilatory response to the correction of acidosis and the sudden rise in Pco2. However, no correlation between decreased CSF pH and depression of sensorium has been established. Ketoacidosis is also seen in cases of starvation, in which it is generally mild and not associated with hyperglycemia. Ketoacids Continue reading >>

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

Kussmaul breathing is a deep, labored breathing pattern that indicates that the body or organs have become too acidic. The body is constantly doing work to maintain an average temperature and neutral blood acidity. To make sure this balance happens; the kidneys and cells rely on bases or buffers, chemical compounds that bind with hydrogen ions. Disruptions to these compounds cause Kussmaul breathing, which is typically associated with conditions that cause metabolic disturbances, such as kidney failure and diabetes. Contents of this article: Kussmaul breathing is a type of hyperventilation that is the lung's emergency response to acidosis. Kussmaul breathing causes a labored, deeper breathing rate. It is most commonly associated with conditions that cause metabolic acidosis, particularly diabetes. Because Kussmaul breathing is a sign of severe metabolic acidosis, which is a life-threatening condition, hospitalization is usually necessary. What is Kussmaul breathing? When the body produces or ingests too much acid; or the kidneys or lungs are failing, blood acid levels increase. If the blood becomes too acidic, acidosis occurs, and the body takes action to restore the imbalance. By using deeper, longer breaths, the lungs can expel more acidic carbon dioxide (C02) than normal. The condition takes its name from Adolph Kussmaul, the German physician who first described the breathing pattern in 1874. Symptoms As a type of hyperventilation, some people describe Kussmaul breathing as panicked breathing, where someone appears to be gasping for breath. The deep, powerful breathing associated with Kussmaul breathing often causes inhalation and exhalation to become more evident and loud. Some compare the sound to exaggerated sighing. Symptoms of acidosis Before the deep and labore Continue reading >>

More in ketosis