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What Is The Ph Of Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

Disorders Of Acid-base Balance

Disorders Of Acid-base Balance

Module 10: Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid-Base Balance By the end of this section, you will be able to: Identify the three blood variables considered when making a diagnosis of acidosis or alkalosis Identify the source of compensation for blood pH problems of a respiratory origin Identify the source of compensation for blood pH problems of a metabolic/renal origin Normal arterial blood pH is restricted to a very narrow range of 7.35 to 7.45. A person who has a blood pH below 7.35 is considered to be in acidosis (actually, physiological acidosis, because blood is not truly acidic until its pH drops below 7), and a continuous blood pH below 7.0 can be fatal. Acidosis has several symptoms, including headache and confusion, and the individual can become lethargic and easily fatigued. A person who has a blood pH above 7.45 is considered to be in alkalosis, and a pH above 7.8 is fatal. Some symptoms of alkalosis include cognitive impairment (which can progress to unconsciousness), tingling or numbness in the extremities, muscle twitching and spasm, and nausea and vomiting. Both acidosis and alkalosis can be caused by either metabolic or respiratory disorders. As discussed earlier in this chapter, the concentration of carbonic acid in the blood is dependent on the level of CO2 in the body and the amount of CO2 gas exhaled through the lungs. Thus, the respiratory contribution to acid-base balance is usually discussed in terms of CO2 (rather than of carbonic acid). Remember that a molecule of carbonic acid is lost for every molecule of CO2 exhaled, and a molecule of carbonic acid is formed for every molecule of CO2 retained. Figure 1. Symptoms of acidosis affect several organ systems. Both acidosis and alkalosis can be diagnosed using a blood test. Metabolic Acidosis: Primary Bic Continue reading >>

Merck And The Merck Manuals

Merck And The Merck Manuals

Acidosis is caused by an overproduction of acid in the blood or an excessive loss of bicarbonate from the blood (metabolic acidosis) or by a buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood that results from poor lung function or depressed breathing (respiratory acidosis). If an increase in acid overwhelms the body's acid-base control systems, the blood will become acidic. As blood pH drops (becomes more acidic), the parts of the brain that regulate breathing are stimulated to produce faster and deeper breathing (respiratory compensation). Breathing faster and deeper increases the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled. The kidneys also try to compensate by excreting more acid in the urine. However, both mechanisms can be overwhelmed if the body continues to produce too much acid, leading to severe acidosis and eventually heart problems and coma. The acidity or alkalinity of any solution, including blood, is indicated on the pH scale. Metabolic acidosis develops when the amount of acid in the body is increased through ingestion of a substance that is, or can be broken down (metabolized) to, an acid—such as wood alcohol (methanol), antifreeze (ethylene glycol), or large doses of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). Metabolic acidosis can also occur as a result of abnormal metabolism. The body produces excess acid in the advanced stages of shock and in poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (diabetic ketoacidosis). Even the production of normal amounts of acid may lead to acidosis when the kidneys are not functioning normally and are therefore not able to excrete sufficient amounts of acid in the urine. Major Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (buildup of ketoacids) Drugs and substances such as acetazolamide, alcohols, and aspirin Lactic acidosis (buildup of lactic acid Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

For acidosis referring to acidity of the urine, see renal tubular acidosis. "Acidemia" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Academia. Acidosis is a process causing increased acidity in the blood and other body tissues (i.e., an increased hydrogen ion concentration). If not further qualified, it usually refers to acidity of the blood plasma. The term acidemia describes the state of low blood pH, while acidosis is used to describe the processes leading to these states. Nevertheless, the terms are sometimes used interchangeably. The distinction may be relevant where a patient has factors causing both acidosis and alkalosis, wherein the relative severity of both determines whether the result is a high, low, or normal pH. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH falls below 7.35 (except in the fetus – see below), while its counterpart (alkalosis) occurs at a pH over 7.45. Arterial blood gas analysis and other tests are required to separate the main causes. The rate of cellular metabolic activity affects and, at the same time, is affected by the pH of the body fluids. In mammals, the normal pH of arterial blood lies between 7.35 and 7.50 depending on the species (e.g., healthy human-arterial blood pH varies between 7.35 and 7.45). Blood pH values compatible with life in mammals are limited to a pH range between 6.8 and 7.8. Changes in the pH of arterial blood (and therefore the extracellular fluid) outside this range result in irreversible cell damage.[1] Signs and symptoms[edit] General symptoms of acidosis.[2] These usually accompany symptoms of another primary defect (respiratory or metabolic). Nervous system involvement may be seen with acidosis and occurs more often with respiratory acidosis than with metabolic acidosis. Signs and symptoms that may be seen i Continue reading >>

Acidosis: An Old Idea Validated By New Research

Acidosis: An Old Idea Validated By New Research

Acidosis: An Old Idea Validated by New Research Copyright 2015 InnoVision Professional Media This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The idea that being too acid contributes to disease susceptibility, especially cancer, has been around for a long time in the natural/integrative medicine world. This concept was easily discounted by conventional medicine as measuring blood pH on various types of diets showed no change. Up until about 10 years ago, no research existed to counter this skepticism. However, since then, a growing body of research has documented not only that acidosis is a real phenomenon, but that it is now known to contribute to a wide range of diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, cancer, osteoporosis, kidney stones, and increased susceptibility to environmental toxinsand new research is adding to the list. In this editorial, I will review the biochemistry the various food components, soft drinks, prescription drugs, and metabolic dysfunctions affect the acid/base balance of cells. In addition, I will address how to determine body acid load and strategies using natural health products and diet to restore normal cellular function and reverse several diseases. We are talking here about acidosis as a process or a trend toward acidemia, not acidemia, which is an actual change in blood pH. Acidemia is defined as a blood pH of less than 7.35. This is very unlikely to occur, as the body has multiple mechanisms for ensuring a very stable blood pH. Acidosis only becomes acidemia when compensatory measures become overwhelmed. This typically only happens in advanced disease like kidney and lung failure. In many ways, we can consider acidosis as the constant pressure on the bodys physiology to compensate for all the acid-inducing challenges. Equally impor Continue reading >>

Physiology, Acidosis, Metabolic

Physiology, Acidosis, Metabolic

Acid-base disorders, including metabolic acidosis, are disturbances in the homeostasis of plasma acidity. Any process that increases the serum hydrogen ion concentration is a distinct acidosis. The term acidemia is used to define the total acid-base status of the serum pH. For example, a patient can have multiple acidoses contributing to a net acidemia.Its origin classifies acidosis as either a respiratory acidosis which involves changes in carbon dioxide, or metabolic acidosis which is influenced by bicarbonate (HCO3). Metabolic acidosis is characterized by an increase in the hydrogen ion concentration in the systemic circulation resulting in a serum HCO3 less than 24 mEq/L. Metabolic acidosis is not a benign condition and signifies an underlying disorder that needs to be corrected to minimize morbidity and mortality. The many etiologies of metabolic acidosis are classified into 4 main mechanisms: increased production of acid, decreased excretion of acid, acid ingestion, and renal or gastrointestinal (GI) bicarbonate losses. Determining the type of metabolic acidosis can help clinicians narrow down the cause of the disturbance. Acidemia refers to a pH less than the normal range of 7.35 to 7.45. In addition, metabolic acidosis requires a bicarbonate value less than 24 mEq/L. Further classification of metabolic acidosis is based on the presence or absence of an anion gap, or concentration of unmeasured serum anions. Plasma neutrality dictates that anions must balance cations to maintain a neutral charge. Therefore, sodium(Na), the primary plasma cation, is balanced by the sum of the anions bicarbonate and chloride in addition to the unmeasured anions, which represent the anion gap. Unmeasured anions include lactate and acetoacetate, and these are often some of the main Continue reading >>

26.5 Disorders Of Acid-base Balance Anatomy And Physiology

26.5 Disorders Of Acid-base Balance Anatomy And Physiology

Glycolic acid, and some oxalic and formic acids* The first three of the eight causes of metabolic acidosis listed are medical (or unusual physiological) conditions. Strenuous exercise can cause temporary metabolic acidosis due to the production of lactic acid. The last five causes result from the ingestion of specific substances. The active form of aspirin is its metabolite, sulfasalicylic acid. An overdose of aspirin causes acidosis due to the acidity of this metabolite. Metabolic acidosis can also result from uremia, which is the retention of urea and uric acid. Metabolic acidosis can also arise from diabetic ketoacidosis, wherein an excess of ketones is present in the blood. Other causes of metabolic acidosis are a decrease in the excretion of hydrogen ions, which inhibits the conservation of bicarbonate ions, and excessive loss of bicarbonate ions through the gastrointestinal tract due to diarrhea. Metabolic Alkalosis: Primary Bicarbonate Excess Metabolic alkalosis is the opposite of metabolic acidosis. It occurs when the blood is too alkaline (pH above 7.45) due to too much bicarbonate (called primary bicarbonate excess). A transient excess of bicarbonate in the blood can follow ingestion of excessive amounts of bicarbonate, citrate, or antacids for conditions such as stomach acid refluxknown as heartburn. Cushings disease, which is the chronic hypersecretion of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) by the anterior pituitary gland, can cause chronic metabolic alkalosis. The oversecretion of ACTH results in elevated aldosterone levels and an increased loss of potassium by urinary excretion. Other causes of metabolic alkalosis include the loss of hydrochloric acid from the stomach through vomiting, potassium depletion due to the use of diuretics for hypertension, and Continue reading >>

Acidosis And Alkalosis

Acidosis And Alkalosis

Find an explanation of your pathology test Acidosis and alkalosis are terms used to describe the abnormal conditions when a patients blood pH does not fall within the healthy range. Measuring the pH of blood is a way of determining how acidic or basic (alkaline) the blood is. Normal blood pH must be maintained within a narrow range of 7.35 - 7.45 to ensure that metabolic processes function properly and the right amount of blood is delivered to the tissues. Many diseases or situations can cause a patients blood pH to fall outside of these limits. In the human body, normal metabolism generates large quantities of acids that must be eliminated to maintain a normal pH balance. Most of the acid is carbonic acid which is produced when carbon dioxide (CO2) combines with water in the body. Lesser quantities of lactic acid, ketoacids and other organic acids are also produced. This balance can be disrupted by a build-up of an acid or a base (alkali) or by an increased loss of an acid or a base (see Figure 1, below). Acidosis occurs when blood pH falls below 7.35 Alkalosis occurs when blood pH rises above 7.45 Both of these conditions act as an alarm to the body; they trigger actions intended to restore the pH balance and return the blood pH to its normal range. The major organs involved in regulating blood pH are the lungs and the kidneys. The lungs flush acid out of the body by exhaling CO2 (carbon dioxide). Within physical limits, the body can raise and lower the rate of breathing to alter the amount of CO2 that is breathed out. This can affect blood pH within seconds or minutes. The kidneys excrete some acids in the urine, and they produce and regulate the retention of HCO3- (bicarbonate), a base that increases the bloods pH or alkalinity. Changes in HCO3- concentration occur Continue reading >>

Record-breaking Blood Ph - Survival Following Extreme Acidosis

Record-breaking Blood Ph - Survival Following Extreme Acidosis

Record-breaking blood pH - survival following extreme acidosis Summarized from Di Rollo N, Caesar D, Fernebach D et al. Survival from profound acidosis due to hypovolaemic shock. A world record? BMJ Case Reports 2013. Published online: doi:10.1136/bcr-2012-008315. Normal cellular metabolism and function require that blood pH be maintained within narrow limits, 7.35-7.45. Even mild excursion outside this range has deleterious effect, and pH of less than 6.8 or greater than 7.8 is considered according to medical and physiology texts incompatible with life. Such a view is challenged by the detail of a recently published case report, which describes survival of a patient whose pH was just 6.53. The case concerns a 65-year-old man who suddenly became unwell at home and was brought to his local hospital emergency department in a state of shock with cool peripheries and marked hypotension (BP 80/40 mmHg). At this time blood gas results were within normal limits, despite increased lactate (5.4 mmol/L). After 2-hour fluid resuscitation, his condition deteriorated rapidly with onset of severe abdominal pain, persisting hemodynamic instability, agitation and eventually, cardiac arrest. Following restoration of cardiac activity, the patient was sent for emergency laparotomy because internal bleeding (possible ruptured aortic aneurysm) and resulting hypovolemia seemed a likely cause of the hemodynamic instability. Blood gas analysis immediately prior to surgery revealed profound metabolic acidosis (pH 6.527; Base Excess (BE) 34.2 mmol/L and lactate 15.6 mmol/L). At laparotomy, marked bleeding from a splenic artery was discovered; the artery was ligated and the spleen removed. By the end of surgery, acidosis had reduced somewhat (pH 6.989; BE 24.1 and lactate 11.5 mmol/L). During su Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. Acidosis is classified as either respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of acidosis is usually caused when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through breathing. Other names for respiratory acidosis are hypercapnic acidosis and carbon dioxide acidosis. Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Chest deformities, such as kyphosis Chest injuries Chest muscle weakness Chronic lung disease Overuse of sedative drugs Metabolic acidosis develops when too much acid is produced in the body. It can also occur when the kidneys cannot remove enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis (also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA) develops when substances called ketone bodies (which are acidic) build up during uncontrolled diabetes. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused by the loss of too much sodium bicarbonate from the body, which can happen with severe diarrhea. Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Lactic acidosis is a buildup of lactic acid. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red blood cells. It forms when the body breaks down carbohydrates to use for energy when oxygen levels are low. This can be caused by: Cancer Drinking too much alcohol Exercising vigorously for a very long time Liver failure Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Medications, such as salicylates MELAS (a very rare genetic mitochondrial disorder that affects energy production) Prolonged lack of oxygen from shock, heart failure, or seve Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

What is acidosis? Acidosis is a serious metabolic imbalance in which there is an excess of acidic molecules in the body. This can occur as a result of acid overproduction, impaired acid transport, acid underexcretion, or any combination. With overproduction, the body makes too much acid. This can occur in sepsis, a life-threatening widespread infection in which the body makes too much lactic acid. With underexcretion, the body is unable to rid itself of excess acid. This can occur in renal failure and various lung diseases. In renal failure, the kidneys are unable to cleanse the blood of acid. In pulmonary diseases, the lungs are unable to exhale sufficient carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is a gaseous form of acid that builds up in the bloodstream. Both conditions may coexst in a number of serious diseases, such as pneumonia and pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs), which is seen in a particularly severe form of heart failure. Doctors diagnose acidosis with blood tests, the most common of which is known as a pH test. The normal pH of the body is 7.4 (a lower pH value is more acidic, higher pH is more alkaline). Acidosis is defined as a pH less than 7.4. Specific blood tests may be used to identify particular acids, such as lactic acid. The treatment of acidosis depends on its cause. Therapy may range from simple interventions, such as oral medications and intravenous fluids, to invasive measures, such as dialysis and surgery. The outcome of acidosis depends on its severity. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) for serious symptoms, such as rapid breathing, confusion, shortness of breath, and lethargy, especially in the setting of lung disease, kidney disease, or other diseases that can cause acidosis. Seek prompt medical care if you are being treated for chronic acidos Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

When your body fluids contain too much acid, it’s known as acidosis. Acidosis occurs when your kidneys and lungs can’t keep your body’s pH in balance. Many of the body’s processes produce acid. Your lungs and kidneys can usually compensate for slight pH imbalances, but problems with these organs can lead to excess acid accumulating in your body. The acidity of your blood is measured by determining its pH. A lower pH means that your blood is more acidic, while a higher pH means that your blood is more basic. The pH of your blood should be around 7.4. According to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC), acidosis is characterized by a pH of 7.35 or lower. Alkalosis is characterized by a pH level of 7.45 or higher. While seemingly slight, these numerical differences can be serious. Acidosis can lead to numerous health issues, and it can even be life-threatening. There are two types of acidosis, each with various causes. The type of acidosis is categorized as either respiratory acidosis or metabolic acidosis, depending on the primary cause of your acidosis. Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis occurs when too much CO2 builds up in the body. Normally, the lungs remove CO2 while you breathe. However, sometimes your body can’t get rid of enough CO2. This may happen due to: chronic airway conditions, like asthma injury to the chest obesity, which can make breathing difficult sedative misuse deformed chest structure Metabolic acidosis Metabolic acidosis starts in the kidneys instead of the lungs. It occurs when they can’t eliminate enough acid or when they get rid of too much base. There are three major forms of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis occurs in people with diabetes that’s poorly controlled. If your body lacks enough insulin, keton Continue reading >>

Bun, Glucose, Creatinine

Bun, Glucose, Creatinine

Normal Values pH = 7.38 - 7.42 [H+] = 40 nM/L for a pH of 7.4 PaCO2 = 40 mm Hg [HCO3] = 24 meq/L Acid base definitions Acid base disorder is considered present when there is abnormality in HCO3 or PaCO2 or pH. Acidosis and alkalosis refer to in-vivo derangement's and not to any change in pH. Acidemia (pH < 7.38) and Alkalemia (pH >7.42) refer to derangement's of blood pH. Kidney and Respiratory system play a key roles in maintaining the acid base status. Primary Acid base disorders Metabolic acidosis loss of [HCO3] 0r addition of [H+] Metabolic alkalosis loss of [H+] or addition of [HCO3] Respiratory acidosis increase in pCO2 Respiratory alkalosis decrease in pCO2 Recquired lab values/information Arterial blood gases: pH, PaCO2,PaO2,Sat,CO BUN, Glucose, Creatinine FIO2 and Clinical history Anion and Cations ANIONS CATIONS Chloride Sodium Bicarbonate(Total CO2) Potassium Proteins Calcium Organic acids Magnesium Phosphates Sulfates Electrochemical balance means that the total anions are the same as total Cations. For practical purposes anion gap is calculated using only Sodium, Chlorides and Total CO2.((140-(104+24)) = 12. Compensatory measures Buffering---occurs immediately Respiratory regulation of pCO2 is intermediate (12-24 hours) Renal regulation of [H] and [HCO3] occurs more slowly (several days) Extracellular almost entirely through bicarbonate whose concentration highest of all buffers small contribution from phosphate Intracellular Hemoglobin can directly buffer protons H+ entry into RBC matched by exit of Na and K+ Hemoglobin can directly buffer dissolved intracellular conversion of Buffer systems Hemoglobin can directly buffer protons H+ entry into RBC matched by exit of Na and K+ Hemoglobin can directly buffer dissolved intracellular conversion of Bicarbonate Continue reading >>

Urine Ph

Urine Ph

Urine pH is used to classify urine as either adilute acid or base solution. Seven is the point of neutrality onthe pH scale. The lower the pH, the greater the acidity of asolution; the higher the pH, the greater the alkalinity. Theglomerular filtrate of blood is usually acidified by the kidneysfrom a pH of approximately 7.4 to a pH of about 6 in the urine.Depending on the person's acid-base status, the pH of urine mayrange from 4.5 to 8. The kidneys maintain normal acid-basebalance primarily through the reabsorption of sodium and thetubular secretion of hydrogen and ammonium ions. Urine becomesincreasingly acidic as the amount of sodium and excess acidretained by the body increases. Alkaline urine, usuallycontaining bicarbonate-carbonic acid buffer, is normally excretedwhen there is an excess of base or alkali in the body. Secretionof an acid or alkaline urine by the kidneys is one of the mostimportant mechanisms the body uses to maintain a constant bodypH. Respiratory diseases that involve hyperventilation (blowing off carbon dioxide and the development of alkalosis) In people who are not vegetarians, the pH ofurine tends to be acidic. A diet rich in citrus fruits, legumes,and vegetables raises the pH and produces urine that is morealkaline. Most of the bacteria responsible for urinary tractinfections make the urine more alkaline because the bacteriasplit urea into ammonia and other alkaline waste products. Theurine pH varies in different types of acidosis and alkalosis.Control of pH is important in the management of several diseases,including bacteriuria, renal calculi, and drug therapy. The formation of renal stones is related to theurine pH. Patients being treated for renal calculi are frequentlygiven diets or medications to change the pH of the urine so thatkidney Continue reading >>

Ph Of The Blood - 6 - Causes Of Abnormality - M J Bookallil

Ph Of The Blood - 6 - Causes Of Abnormality - M J Bookallil

A rise in concentration of any of these acids in the blood causes a fall in the pH of the blood. Loss of acid from the blood (e.g. into gastric juice) causes a rise in the pH. Only HCl and H2CO3 can be lost from the blood in appreciable quantities. The bases which can cause changes in blood pH are: Administration of base by mouth or parenterally may cause blood pH to rise if rate of excretion does not match rate of administration. Loss of alkaline fluid from bowel (diarrhoea, intestinal obstruction or intestinal fistulae), or urine (after acetoazolamide) will cause blood pH to fall. 6.3 CLINICAL CLASSIFICATION OF CAUSES OF CHANGES IN BLOOD pH Clinical states of pH disturbence (acid-base inbalance) can conveniently be divided into two groups, i.e. (a)respiratory and (b)metabolic or non-respiratory. The reasons for this division into respiratory and non-respiratory are that: i) the compensatory mechanisms ( Section 3.5.1 ) and treatments ( Section 7 ) of the two types are different.; ii) the recognition of non-respiratory disturbances is masked by compensatory alterations in PCO2 and the recognition of changes in pH caused by PCO2 changes are masked by renal compensation. 6.3.1 RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS. This is synonymous with CO2 retention and is usually a sign of hypoventilation. Compensation is renal. There is renal loss HCl in the form of buffer or as NH4Cl. During recvovery chloride has to be supplied and retained. 6.3.1.2 Inhalational of CO2 This is another cause of respiratory acidosis, but it is only likely to occur under situations of re-breathing, e.g. under anaesthesia or during resuscitation with a Water's cannister circuit without the cannister, i.e. ward resuscitators or Type C anaesthetic systems. ( Mapleson, 1954 ). 6.3.1.3 Increased production of CO2. This v Continue reading >>

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