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What Is The Meaning Of Acidosis?

Types Of Acidosis And Foods To Avoid- Easy Health Options

Types Of Acidosis And Foods To Avoid- Easy Health Options

Easy Health Options Home Healthy Living Full body acid: Whats eating you? You want to feel vibrant. We all do. But something is eating away at you and causing many of the ailments you potentially face, ranging from lack of energy to cancer Acidosis is when your bodys internal environment meaning all its blood, cells, tissues and organs are in an acidic state. Healthy humans are alkaline humans. An alkaline state is the opposite of an acidic state. So overcoming a chronic state of acidosis and replacing it with a natural, balanced state of alkalinity, is the way to restore health and vibrancy. To do that, you need to look at the pH of your body, the foods that go into it and the other outside factors that can tip that balance Your pH (potential of hydrogen) is a reflection of your bodys balance between its alkaline and acidic state. That pH is measured on a logarithmic scale in which 7.0 is neutral. The lower the reading on the scale the more acidic the body is and the higher the reading, above 7, the more alkaline the body. When the body maintains a high pH you feel vibrant, at ease and well. However, when the environment of the body is acidic, with a low pH reading, inflammation, pain, disease, and other unhealthful issues arise. Indeed, acidic blood can cause stroke, heart attack, atherosclerosis and high blood pressure. An acidic body can even lead to depression and obesity because of how the body is hampered in its ability to process nutrients, expel heavy metals and metabolize wastes. Diseases like cancer cannot thrive in an alkaline environment. But an acidic body does allow cancer cells to proliferate. Many other diseases, including arthritis, emphysema, and diabetes can begin, progress faster and thrive in an acidic environment. An acidic environment in the bod Continue reading >>

Too Much Acid In The Body In Cats

Too Much Acid In The Body In Cats

From 560 quotes ranging from $500 - 5,000 First, the kidneys produce bicarbonate ions, which are alkaline and counter acid. The kidneys also flush out excess acid in the urine. Too much acid in the body in cats, also known as metabolic acidosis, occurs when the kidneys cease to perform this function, allowing acid to build up in the blood and body and causing a variety of harmful symptoms. The body of your cat is made up of a delicate balance of acid and base, or alkaline, materials. Your cat takes in acid through nutrition, meaning food. In a healthy cat, the kidneys and lungs will balance out or eliminate excess acid. The kidneys are mostly responsible for eliminating excess acid from the body through two separate functions. Symptoms of Too Much Acid in the Body in Cats When the acid levels in the body in your cat start to rise, many different symptoms begin to develop. As the acid levels increase, symptoms begin to escalate rapidly in severity. If not treated, high acid levels will eventually cause organ problems and shutdown. Diagnosis of Too Much Acid in the Body in Cats As with any serious condition, diagnosis of metabolic acidosis will begin with a thorough physical examination by your veterinarian. Your vet will examine gum color and eyes for any discoloration. They will also physically manipulate the abdomen of your cat, feeling manually for any lumps, bumps or swelling. As a pet owner, it will be important that you provide your veterinarian with a thorough medical history. Underlying conditions, such as chronic kidney failure or diabetes, are primary causes of too much acid in the body. It is very important that you disclose the presence of these conditions so that your cat gets the proper care. There are several blood and urine tests available to diagnoses m Continue reading >>

Uncompensated, Partially Compensated, Or Combined Abg Problems

Uncompensated, Partially Compensated, Or Combined Abg Problems

Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) analysis requires in-depth expertise. If the results are not understood right, or are wrongly interpreted, it can result in wrong diagnosis and end up in an inappropriate management of the patient. ABG analysis is carried out when the patient is dealing with the following conditions: • Breathing problems • Lung diseases (asthma, cystic fibrosis, COPD) • Heart failure • Kidney failure ABG reports help in answering the following questions: 1. Is there acidosis or alkalosis? 2. If acidosis is present, whether it is in an uncompensated state, partially compensated state, or in fully compensated state? 3. Whether acidosis is respiratory or metabolic? ABG reports provide the following descriptions: PaCO2 (partial pressure of dissolved CO2 in the blood) and PaO2 (partial pressure of dissolved O2 in the blood) describe the efficiency of exchange of gas in the alveolar level into the blood. Any change in these levels causes changes in the pH. HCO3 (bicarbonate in the blood) maintains the pH of the blood within normal range by compensatory mechanisms, which is either by retaining or increasing HCO3 excretion by the kidney. When PaCO2 increases, HCO3 decreases to compensate the pH. The following table summarizes the changes: ABG can be interpreted using the following analysis points: Finding acidosis or alkalosis: • If pH is more it is acidosis, if pH is less it is alkalosis. Finding compensated, partially compensated, or uncompensated ABG problems: • When PaCO2 is high, but pH is normal instead of being acidic, and if HCO3 levels are also increased, then it means that the compensatory mechanism has retained more HCO3 to maintain the pH. • When PaCO2 and HCO3 values are high but pH is acidic, then it indicates partial compensation. It means t Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

acidosis [as″ĭ-do´sis] 1. the accumulation of acid and hydrogen ions or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate content) in the blood and body tissues, resulting in a decrease in pH. 2. a pathologic condition resulting from this process, characterized by increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in pH). The optimal acid-base balance is maintained by chemical buffers, biologic activities of the cells, and effective functioning of the lungs and kidneys. The opposite of acidosis is alkalosis. adj., adj acidot´ic. Acidosis usually occurs secondary to some underlying disease process; the two major types, distinguished according to cause, are metabolic acidosis and respiratory acidosis (see accompanying table). In mild cases the symptoms may be overlooked; in severe cases symptoms are more obvious and may include muscle twitching, involuntary movement, cardiac arrhythmias, disorientation, and coma. In general, treatment consists of intravenous or oral administration of sodium bicarbonate or sodium lactate solutions and correction of the underlying cause of the imbalance. Many cases of severe acidosis can be prevented by careful monitoring of patients whose primary illness predisposes them to respiratory problems or metabolic derangements that can cause increased levels of acidity or decreased bicarbonate levels. Such care includes effective teaching of self-care to the diabetic so that the disease remains under control. Patients receiving intravenous therapy, especially those having a fluid deficit, and those with biliary or intestinal intubation should be watched closely for early signs of acidosis. Others predisposed to acidosis are patients with shock, hyperthyroidism, advanced circulatory failure, renal failure, respiratory disorders, or liver disease. Continue reading >>

Acid-base Balance Tutorial - Terminology

Acid-base Balance Tutorial - Terminology

4. Hasselbalch complicated Henderson's simple equation. Carbonic Acid (H2CO3) is a mixture of ionization and dissociation products: Henderson (1908) modified this to create the simple Henderson (equilibrium) Equation: Eight years later Hasselbalch complicated Henderson's work by introducing Sorensen's logarithmic notation to produce the dreaded Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation see below : Calling this equation an awkward inverse may be too polite. It is a major source of confusion and provides no extra information. The pH is the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion concentration. A complete definition requires that the logarithm is defined as being to the base ten and the concentration be measured as activity in moles per liter. Because pH falls as the acidity increases it is safer to avoid "increase" and "decrease" and use "more acid" and "more alkaline" instead. To learn more about pH, experiment with the pH playground . The Logarithm is responsible for the mistaken impression that the body maintains remarkably tight control over its hydrogen ion concentration - it doesn't. (Measure blood pressure or pulse using the logarithmic notation and they appear equally stable). To understand logarithm, think of "power." Thus 103 = 1000 and log (1000) = 3. When the pH changes by 0.3 units, e.g., from 7.4 to 7.1 the hydrogen ion concentration doubles (from 40 to 80 nMol/1). [H+] would be so much easier to understand! PCO2 is the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The normal value in arterial blood is 40 mmHg (or 5.33 kPa). The end-exhaled value is usually very similar. Under anesthesia the end-exhaled value is often lower than the arterial value due to several contributing factors. The mixed venous PCO2 is approximately 46 mmHg (6.13 kPa) Neutral is the pH at which there are e Continue reading >>

Definitions

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition n. An abnormal increase in the acidity of the body's fluids, caused either by accumulation of acids or by depletion of bicarbonates. from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License n. An abnormally increased acidity of the blood. from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English n. abnormally high acidity of the blood and other body fluids. from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia n. Poisoning by certain acids, such as uric acid or the fatty acids, formed within the body under various morbid conditions, such as cancer, diabetes, or fever. Also called acid intoxication. from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved. n. abnormally high acidity (excess hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissues Continue reading >>

Causes And Consequences Of Fetal Acidosis

Causes And Consequences Of Fetal Acidosis

The causes and consequences ofacute (minutes or hours) andchronic (days or weeks) fetal acidosis are different In the past much attention has been paid to acute acidosis during labour, but in previously normal fetuses this israrely associated with subsequent damage In contrast, chronic acidosis, which is often not detected antenatally, is associated with a significant increase in neurodevelopmental delay The identification of small for gestational age fetuses by ultrasound scans and the use of Doppler waveforms to detect which of these have placental dysfunction mean that these fetuses can be monitored antenatally Delivery before hypoxia has produced chronic acidosis, may prevent subsequent damage and good timing of delivery remains the only management option at present. What is acidosis? Acidosis means a high hydrogen ion concentration in the tissues. Acidaemia refers to a high hydrogen ion concentration in the blood and is the most easily measured indication of tissue acidosis. The unit most commonly used is pH, which is log to base 10 of the reciprocal of the hydrogen ion concentration. Whereas blood pH can change quickly, tissue pH is more stable. The cut off taken to define acidaemia in adults is a pH of less than 7.36, but after labour and normal delivery much lower values commonly occur in the fetus (pH 7.00), often with no subsequent ill effects. Studies looking at the pH of fetuses from cord blood samples taken antenatally and at delivery have established reference ranges. Other indices sometimes used to assess acidosis are the base excess or bicarbonate. Neither of these is measured by conventional blood gas machines but is calculated from the measured pH and pCO2. The major sources of hydrogen ions in the fetus are carbonic and lactic acids from aerobic and a Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of High Or Low Ph Levels?

What Are The Dangers Of High Or Low Ph Levels?

A woman is getting her heartbeat listened to.Photo Credit: Medioimages/Photodisc/Photodisc/Getty Images What Are the Dangers of High or Low PH Levels? Joseph Pritchard graduated from Our Lady of Fatima Medical School with a medical degree. He has spent almost a decade studying humanity. Dr. Pritchard writes as a San Francisco biology expert for a prominent website and thoroughly enjoys sharing the knowledge he has accumulated. Your body needs to maintain an optimum acid-base balance, or pH level, to ensure the various processes within your body occur without problems, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. When your bodys pH level becomes high, the condition is known as alkalosis. When your bodys pH level becomes low, the condition is called acidosis. Both alkalosis and acidosis can have dangerous consequences if untreated. Alkalosis can cause arrhythmia, or an irregular heartbeat, notes the New York Times Health Guide. This may occur when your body hyperventilates. The consequent irregularity in breathing can cause the heart to beat at irregular intervals as well. In order to diagnosis alkalosis, doctors will check carbon dioxide and sodium bicarbonate levels in your blood. These two chemicals help regulate breathing, heart rate and organ function. If you have high pH levels, your carbon dioxide will be low and sodium bicarbonate levels will be high. This will cause an increase in your breathing rate and cardiac arrhythmia. You may experience difficulty breathing, chest pain and palpitations. Alkalosis can induce a coma if pH levels are sufficiently high, notes the New York Times Health Guide. This may be a consequence of breathing difficulties typical of alkalosis. The risk of an alkalosis-induced coma may be affected by other factors, such as the le Continue reading >>

Acidosis At Birth Significance For Very Premature, Low-birthweight Infants

Acidosis At Birth Significance For Very Premature, Low-birthweight Infants

Acidosis at birth significance for very premature, low-birthweight infants Summarized from Randolph D, Nolen T, Ambalaven N et al. Outcomes of extremely low birthweight infants with acidosis at birth. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2014 (published online February 19, 2014 ahead of print publication) Available at: Umbilical-cord blood gas analysis provides objective evidence of the metabolic status of neonates at the time of delivery. Perinatal metabolic acidosis is indicative of hypoxia (sometimes the result of asphyxia during birth) and associated risk of permanent brain damage. A recently published study sought to assess the incidence and significance of perinatal acidosis for that very small subset of newborns that are born very prematurely (<28 weeks gestation) and have extremely low birthweight (<1000 g). Around a third of these most vulnerable newborns do not survive and for those who do survive, around a third suffer neurodevelopmental impairment, manifest as one or more of a range of permanent life-disabling conditions that include cerebral palsy, blindness, deafness, cognitive deficit, etc. The principal question addressed by the study is: can the presence of acidosis at birth be used to help predict outcome for these highly vulnerable babies? The study population comprised 3979 babies born at hospitals across the US between 2002 and 2007 with birthweight in the range of 400-1000 g. Mean ( SD) gestational age for the cohort was 26 ( 2.0) weeks. For each of these very premature babies the results of cord blood gas analysis were retrieved. Additionally, clinical data relating to each pregnancy/birth, as well as eventual outcome for the baby were recovered. For the purposes of the study acidosis was defined as either cord-blood pH less than 7.0 or cord-blood ba Continue reading >>

Acidosis Ph And Ill Health

Acidosis Ph And Ill Health

"Acidosis, Ph, and ill Health" Acidosis is a condition in which there is too much acid in the body fluids. When nutritionists talk about acid- or alkaline-forming foods, they are referring to the condition of the food after ingestion. There are many food substances which are acidic in their natural form that become alkaline when broken down within the body. Every year the number of prescriptions written for acid-alkaline imbalances continues to increase. Antiacids, alkalizers, specific digestive enzymes, etc. remain popular as household "remedies" for many acute digestive disorders. The temporary relief experienced by these so-called remedies is interpreted by the majority of sufferers as being a cure for the problem. Nothing could be further from the truth. These drugs work in much the same way as a lazy housecleaner sweeps the dust under the rug; that is, covering up the symptom, but not eliminating the cause. Our bodies are like the rug in that they will only allow the drugs to cover up the problem for so long. Eventually, these acute digestive disorders will become chronic, resulting in a more difficult condition for the body to deal with. So, what was once simply a minor case of acid indigestion or heartburn becomes a major digestive ailment. The stomach, liver, small and large intestines, kidneys and pancreas can all be seriously impaired, both from consumption of an improper diet and from the use of drugs that cover up an overly-acidic diet and the, consequent indigestion. Almost anyone who has been eating the standard diet of meat, dairy foods and refined and processed foods will suffer in varying degrees from an acid-alkaline imbalance. Add to this fare: alcohol, cigarettes, drugs and condiments, and the percentages will rise even higher. The physicist MANFRED Continue reading >>

The Meaning Of Acidbase Abnormalities In The Intensive Care Unit Effects Of Fluid Administration

The Meaning Of Acidbase Abnormalities In The Intensive Care Unit Effects Of Fluid Administration

The meaning of acidbase abnormalities in the intensive care unit effects of fluid administration Stewart's quantitative physical chemical approach enables us to understand the acidbase properties of intravenous fluids. In Stewart's analysis, the three independent acidbase variables are partial CO2 tension, the total concentration of nonvolatile weak acid (ATOT), and the strong ion difference (SID). Raising and lowering ATOT while holding SID constant cause metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, respectively. Lowering and raising plasma SID while clamping ATOT cause metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, respectively. Fluid infusion causes acidbase effects by forcing extracellular SID and ATOT toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Thus, fluids with vastly differing pH can have the same acidbase effects. The stimulus is strongest when large volumes are administered, as in correction of hypovolaemia, acute normovolaemic haemodilution, and cardiopulmonary bypass. Zero SID crystalloids such as saline cause a 'dilutional' acidosis by lowering extracellular SID enough to overwhelm the metabolic alkalosis of ATOT dilution. A balanced crystalloid must reduce extracellular SID at a rate that precisely counteracts the ATOT dilutional alkalosis. Experimentally, the crystalloid SID required is 24 mEq/l. When organic anions such as L-lactate are added to fluids they can be regarded as weak ions that do not contribute to fluid SID, provided they are metabolized on infusion. With colloids the presence of ATOT is an additional consideration. Albumin and gelatin preparations contain ATOT, whereas starch preparations do not. Hextend is a hetastarch preparation balanced with L-lactate. It reduces or eliminates infusion related metabolic acidosis, may improve gastric mucosal blood flow, Continue reading >>

Acidosis: The Kiss Of Death!

Acidosis: The Kiss Of Death!

WHAT CAUSES A CONDITION CALLED "ACIDOSIS"? WHAT IS ACIDOSIS? Acidosis Definition: Acidosis is an increased acidity in the blood and other body tissue. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH falls below 7.35. The pH level of our blood affects every cell in our body. Chronic acidosis corrodes body tissue, and if left unchecked, will interrupt all cellular activities and functions. WHAT CAUSES ACIDOSIS? HIGH ACID-FORMING FOODS and DIETS all lead to ACIDOSIS. Living a fast-paced daily lifestyle, such as eating on the run and excessive over stimulation, will lead people to face a constant symptoms of indigestion and growing endangerment of over-acidification (Acidosis) of the body cells, which will interrupt cellular activities and functions. It is a major root of sickness and disease. Having our cells constantly exposed to an acidic environment leads to acidosis and then chronic acidosis and finally various forms of disease such as cancer and many more! Studies have shown that an acidic, anaerobic (which is also the lack of oxygen) body environment encourages the breeding of fungus, mold, bacteria, and viruses. As a result, our inner biological terrain shifts from a healthy oxygenated, alkaline environment to an unhealthy acidic one (acidic pH scale). This forces the body to constantly deplete its cellular energy to neutralize and detoxify these acids before they can act as poisons in and around the cells, ultimately changing the environment of each cell and finally compromising its immune system leaving it vulnerable to the ravages of disease to take a foothold in the body. When our body pH becomes overly acidic, it starts to set up defense mechanisms to keep the damaging acids from entering the vital organs. Modern Day Athletes and Acid-Forming Foods Unfortunately, Mo Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. Acidosis is classified as either respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of acidosis is usually caused when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through breathing. Other names for respiratory acidosis are hypercapnic acidosis and carbon dioxide acidosis. Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Chest deformities, such as kyphosis Chest injuries Chest muscle weakness Chronic lung disease Overuse of sedative drugs Metabolic acidosis develops when too much acid is produced in the body. It can also occur when the kidneys cannot remove enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis (also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA) develops when substances called ketone bodies (which are acidic) build up during uncontrolled diabetes. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused by the loss of too much sodium bicarbonate from the body, which can happen with severe diarrhea. Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Lactic acidosis is a buildup of lactic acid. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red blood cells. It forms when the body breaks down carbohydrates to use for energy when oxygen levels are low. This can be caused by: Cancer Drinking too much alcohol Exercising vigorously for a very long time Liver failure Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Medications, such as salicylates MELAS (a very rare genetic mitochondrial disorder that affects energy production) Prolonged lack of oxygen from shock, heart failure, or seve Continue reading >>

Rumen Acidosis

Rumen Acidosis

Managing disease can be a frustrating proposition. This Guide can help you identify which disease is damaging your cattle. Rumen acidosis is a metabolic disease of cattle. Like most metabolic diseases it is important to remember that for every cow that shows clinical signs, there will be several more which are affected sub-clinically. Acidosis is said to occur when the pH of the rumen falls to less than 5.5 (normal is 6.5 to 7.0). In many cases the pH can fall even lower. The fall in pH has two effects. Firstly, the rumen stops moving, becoming atonic. This depresses appetite and production. Secondly, the change in acidity changes the rumen flora, with acid-producing bacteria taking over. They produce more acid, making the acidosis worse. The increased acid is then absorbed through the rumen wall, causing metabolic acidosis, which in severe cases can lead to shock and death. Cause The primary cause of acidosis is feeding a high level of rapidly digestible carbohydrate, such as barley and other cereals. Acute acidosis, often resulting in death, is most commonly seen in ‘barley beef’ animals where cattle have obtained access to excess feed. In dairy cattle, a milder form, sub-acute acidosis, is seen as a result of feeding increased concentrates compared to forage. Symptoms Acute acidosis often results in death, although illness and liver abscesses may be seen before hand. Cattle may become depressed, go off feed, have an elevated heart rate or diarrhea. Sub-acute: Reduced feed intake Poor body condition and weight loss Unexplained diarrhoea Temperature Pulse rate and respiratory rate may rise Lethargy Treatment Because subacute ruminal acidosis is not detected at the time of depressed ruminal pH, there is no specific treatment for it. Secondary conditions may be treat Continue reading >>

For Patients And Visitors

For Patients And Visitors

Definition Metabolic acidosis is a condition in which there is too much acid in the body fluids. Alternative Names Acidosis - metabolic Causes Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Prolonged lack of oxygen from shock, heart failure, or severe anemia Seizures Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Severe dehydration Symptoms Most symptoms are caused by the underlying disease or condition that is causing the metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis itself most often causes rapid breathing. Acting confused or very tired may also occur. Severe metabolic acidosis can lead to shock or death. In some situations, metabolic acidosis can be a mild, ongoing (chronic) condition. Exams and Tests These tests can help diagnose acidosis. They can also determine whether the cause is a breathing problem or a metabolic problem. Tests may include: Arterial blood gas Basic metabolic panel, (a group of blood tests that measure your sodium and potassium levels, kidney function, and other chemicals and function Continue reading >>

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