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What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Diabetes?

Hyperglycemia Vs Hypoglycemia: What’s The Difference?

Hyperglycemia Vs Hypoglycemia: What’s The Difference?

If you have diabetes, you’re likely well aware of the issues that can come with blood sugar levels that are too high—or too low. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may sound similar, but they can have very different consequences. Using too much or too little insulin can affect your blood sugar levels, but even if you aren’t diabetic, you should know that side effects of other medications, not eating enough (or eating too much), or even exercising more than usual can all affect your blood sugar. The scary part? Some people don’t have many symptoms, and may not be able to tell that their blood sugar is too high or too low without a glucose meter check. So what’s the difference, and how can you avoid hyper- and hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Low blood sugar can be caused by not eating enough food or a delayed meal, an unusual amount of exercise, and drinking alcohol without eating food. If you use insulin, you know that your blood sugar levels can go too low if you use too much of your medication. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include sweatiness, shaking, dizziness, confusion, a fast heartbeat, hunger, feeling weak or tired, feeling nervous or upset, or headache. Will I notice if my blood sugar is low? Maybe. You may experience some of the symptoms mentioned above like feeling sweaty, shaky, or dizzy; a fast heartbeat; or feeling hungry. However, some people don’t feel anything at all. Hypoglycemia unawareness is the term for not being able to tell if your blood sugar is low, and it can be very dangerous. How can I know if my blood sugar is low if I don’t notice any symptoms? You’ll need to use a blood glucose meter, which can determine the amount of sugar in your blood using a small drop of blood typically from you Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

By Debra A. Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE, CLVT, OTR/L, SCLV What Is Hyperglycemia? In relation to diabetes, hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the American Diabetes Association. It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease, talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Complications from Hyperglycemia Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Stroke (cerebral vascular disease) Heart attack or Congestive Heart Failure (coronary heart disease) Circulation disorders and possible amputation (peripheral vascular disease) When smaller blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Kidney disease (nephropathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Joseph Monks: Writer, Producer, and Film Director Joseph Monks, who has diabetic retinopathy, creates and produces films for his production company Sight Unseen Pictures. He is also the first blind filmmaker to direct a feature film. Says Joe, "I'm not uncomfortable with the term 'blind.' I'm not thrilled about it, of course, but it's accurate. The lights went out for me in early 2002 as a result of diabetic retinopathy—the death of my retinas. It is what it is, so when it happened, I decided that I wasn't going to let it put an en Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes And High Blood Sugar

Difference Between Diabetes And High Blood Sugar

Key difference: High Blood Sugar is a condition that at times may affect some people. The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) that is present in the blood. If the blood sugar levels are often outside the normal range, it may be an indicator of a medical condition, such as Diabetes. Diabetes is a type of disease that affects people with high blood sugar. High Blood Sugar is a condition that at times may affect some people. The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) that is present in the blood. The glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream. Here, a hormone makes the glucose available for cell absorption. The hormone is called insulin and is produced primarily in the pancreas. The reason for high blood sugar is that either there isn’t enough insulin in the body or that the cells do not react as expected to the insulin. Both cases result in the cells not absorbing the glucose, hence increased levels of glucose in the bloodstream. According to Wikipedia, the recommended level of normal blood glucose level in humans is about 5.5 mM (5.5 mmol/L or 100 mg/dL, i.e. milligrams/deciliter). However, the level fluctuates throughout the day, depending on the time and amount of food intake. Glucose levels are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day and rise after meals for an hour or two by a few millimolar. Wikipedia states that the normal blood glucose level while fasting (i.e. before the first meal of the day (for non-diabetics, should be between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). While, the blood sugar levels for those without diabetes and who are not fasting should be below 125 mg/dL. It is the body’s task to n Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin ( type 1 diabetes ) or can't respond to insulin properly ( type 2 diabetes ). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: All of these need to be b Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

How To Tell The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia

How To Tell The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia

The differences between these extremes Pressmaster /Shutterstock Either one of these conditions could be part of silent diabetes symptoms you might be missing—they both involve difficulty regulating blood sugar, or glucose. But even non-diabetics can be susceptible to blood sugar extremes, called hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. "Hyperglycemia is defined as abnormally high blood sugar levels," says Tanya Zuckerbrot, MS, RD, a New York City-based dietitian, bestselling author, and founder of The F-Factor Diet. "It occurs when the body does not have enough insulin to bring glucose into the cells for energy." In other words, you have an overload of sugar, more than your body can handle. On the other hand, "hypoglycemia is defined as abnormally low blood sugar levels," she says. "When blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone called glucagon signals the liver to release stored glucose to raise blood sugar back to normal. If this does not occur you experience hypoglycemia." Warning signs for hyperglycemia Andrey Popov /Shutterstock One of the good things that happen to your body when you stop eating sugar is avoiding hyperglycemia. How can you know if you may be experiencing this sugar overload? "Hyperglycemia symptoms can include thirst, urination, blurry vision, and depending on the severity, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting, or reduced concentration and awareness," says Kathleen Dungan, MD, an endocrinologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. "It is important to note that depending upon the severity, hyperglycemia may not cause any symptoms at all." This is why people with diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar, and take insulin to help the body absorb it. Be on the lookout for hypoglycemia symptoms One of the medical reasons you're always hungry could b Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Diabetes?

The two are related, but not the same. Hyperglycemia is a term that describes a blood sugar level that is higher than normal. Hyperglycemia is not itself a disease. Diabetes, on the other hand, is. Diabetes occurs when the body is no longer able to effectively control the amount of sugar in your blood, which leads to hyperglycemia. While diabetes is one of the most common causes of hyperglycemia, it can come from other sources, too, including pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, Cushing’s syndrome, certain types of tumors, and some medications. Both hyperglycemia and diabetes can be serious if left untreated, so you should talk to a doctor if you suspect you have one (or both). This website can get you access to 24/7 online doctor consultations as well as information about both traditional and holistic treatments for these and other symptoms/diseases. Here’s to your continued health and happiness! Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Hypoglycemia (diabetic) & Hyperglycemia

Definition Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar (glucose) level. Hyperglycemia is defined as too high a blood sugar (glucose) level. Description As you regulate your blood glucose and keep your diabetes record, there are two problems that you need to be able to recognize and treat (with your personal physician’s advice): hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia, or an insulin reaction, can happen if you are taking insulin or oral medications. Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose. This reaction happens when there is not enough glucose in your blood. A hypoglycemic reaction usually comes on very suddenly. It often happens at the time when insulin action is at its peak, during or after strenuous exercise or when a meal is delayed. Most people learn to recognize their own symptoms to an insulin reaction. If you begin feeling any symptoms or think your blood glucose may be too low, the best way to be sure is to check your blood level using a blood glucose test strip. If your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dl, then you are probably having a hypoglycemic reaction. Hyperglycemia: Hyperglycemia, or high blood glucose, is the condition found in individuals with diabetes, either insulin-dependent or non-insulin-dependent. Causes The most common causes of hypoglycemia are: 1. too much insulin, 2. too much exercise, or 3. not enough food Hyperglycemia usually occurs slowly, over several hours or days. It may be caused by: 1. not taking enough insulin 2. illness (such as a cold or flu) 3. infection 4. eating too much 5. stress 6. certain medications Symptoms Symptoms that you may notice with hypoglycemia are: sweating weakness anxiety trembling fast heartbeat inability to think straight irritability grouchiness hunger headache sleepiness Signs and sympto Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes & Hyperglycemia

Difference Between Diabetes & Hyperglycemia

The rate of diabetes in the United States increased nearly 167 percent between 1980 and 2011. Understanding the basics of diabetes is crucial for individuals who are interested in keeping this dangerous condition in check. Both diabetes and hyperglycemia are characterized by high blood sugar -- in fact, people with diabetes may occasionally become hyperglycemic -- but the causes and treatments for each condition are somewhat different. Video of the Day Diabetes is a disorder characterized by high amounts of sugar in the bloodstream that occurs as a result of a lack of insulin or insulin insensitivity -- and while there are a number of ways in which diabetes can be diagnosed, the use of the standardized blood tests are especially popular. Individuals who have an A1c level equal to or greater than 6.5 percent, a fasting plasma glucose level equal to or greater than 126 milligrams per deciliter or an oral glucose tolerance test level equal to or greater than 200 mg/dL after two hours of drinking a sweetened beverage -- or a random plasma glucose level of equal to or greater than 200 mg/dL -- may be diagnosed with diabetes. In most cases, tests will be performed at least twice to confirm the findings, notes the American Diabetes Association. As with diabetes, hyperglycemia is characterized by high amounts of sugar in the bloodstream -- and in fact, most healthy adults will experience a slight increase in blood sugar levels to greater than 100 mg/dL shortly after eating a meal. Unlike diabetes, however, hyperglycemia may not always be related to a lack of insulin or insulin sensitivity; instead, it can occur as the result of stress, chronic or acute illness, prescription or illegal medication use and even pregnancy. People who have been diagnosed with diabetes will likely ex Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia can occur when blood sugar levels are too high. People develop hyperglycemia if their diabetes is not treated properly. Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. It is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health consequences. In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is released into the bloodstream, or the insulin cannot be used properly. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all. We need insulin to live. Without it, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood because it cannot be taken out and used by the body. Very high blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, leads to a number of symptoms. If blood sugar levels are too low, it is called hypoglycemia. When is blood sugar considered to be too high or too low? Slight fluctuations in blood sugar levels are completely normal and also happen on a daily basis in people who do not have diabetes. Between around 60 and 140 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) is considered to be healthy. This is equivalent to between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/L. “Millimole per liter” (mmol/L) is the international unit for measuring blood sugar. It indicates the concentration of a certain substance per liter. If type 1 diabetes is left untreated, people’s blood sugar levels can get very high, even exceeding 27.8 mmol/L (500 mg/dL). Such high levels are rather uncommon for type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar concentrations below 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) are considered to be too low. As you can see in the illustration below, there are no clear-cut borders between the normal range of blood sugar and high and low blood sugar. Signs of hyperglycemia People with type 2 diabetes do not always realize that their Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Diabetes And Hyperglycemia

Tweet Hyperglycemia occurs when people with diabetes have too much sugar in their bloodstream. Hyperglycemia should not be confused with hypoglycemia, which is when blood sugar levels go too low. You should aim to avoid spending long periods of time with high blood glucose levels. What is hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia, the term for expressing high blood sugar, has been defined by the World Health Organisation as: Blood glucose levels greater than 7.0 mmol/L (126 mg/dl) when fasting Blood glucose levels greater than 11.0 mmol/L (200 mg/dl) 2 hours after meals Although blood sugar levels exceeding 7 mmol/L for extended periods of time can start to cause damage to internal organs, symptoms may not develop until blood glucose levels exceed 11 mmol/L. What causes hyperglycemia? The underlying cause of hyperglycemia will usually be from loss of insulin producing cells in the pancreas or if the body develops resistance to insulin. More immediate reasons for hyperglycemia include: Missing a dose of diabetic medication, tablets or insulin Eating more carbohydrates than your body and/or medication can manage Being mentally or emotionally stressed (injury, surgery or anxiety) Contracting an infection What are the symptoms of hyperglycemia? The main 3 symptoms of high blood sugar levels are increased urination, increased thirst and increased hunger. High blood sugar levels can also contribute to the following symptoms: Regular/above-average urination Weakness or feeling tired Increased thirst Vision blurring Is hyperglycemia serious? Hyperglycemia can be serious if: Blood glucose levels stay high for extended periods of time - this can lead to the development of long term complications Blood glucose levels rise dangerously high - this can lead to short term complications In the shor Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Dka And Hyperglycemia???

What's The Difference Between Dka And Hyperglycemia???

Hello, there are many things to learn about when you become diabetic. Hyperglycemia is basically having blood sugars that are above normal. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that leads to a diabetic coma or death. This is nothing to take lightly, obviously. When glucose isn't taken in by cells, your body has to get energy from somewhere. Your body will start burning fat to get this energy. Ketones form and build up in your bloodstream, spilling into your urine. This is a warning sign that insulin is not present in your body and it's a warning sign that you will be having a diabetic emergency. Continue reading >>

Our Readers Want To Know: What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

Our Readers Want To Know: What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

Our Readers Want to Know: What Is the Difference Between Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia? Our Readers Want to Know: What Is the Difference Between Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia? Editor's note: One of the many benefits associated with an online information center and website, such as VisionAware , is the ability to track readers' search terms [i.e., information readers are seeking as they search the Internet]. Since the earliest days of VisionAware.org, the following questions about blood glucose levels and diabetes consistently rank within the five most popular searches: How do blood glucose levels relate to diabetes? What is the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia? An Answer from Debra Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE This week, during National Diabetes Month , our answer comes from Debra Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE , a private practitioner and consultant in the fields of diabetes, disability, and vision loss and author of An Introduction to Diabetes and Diabetic Retinopathy on the VisionAware website. Hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the ADA. It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease, talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: H Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia?

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can both occur in patients who have diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin (known as ‘Type 1 Diabetes’) or the cells in the body stop responding to insulin (known as ‘Type 2 Diabetes’). So what’s the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia? And how can a first aider spot the difference? Read on to find out how! Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia occurs when insulin is in excess of that needed to balance the patient’s food intake and energy expenditure. If untreated it will lead to unconsciousness and if prolonged, irreversible damage can occur. Signs and symptoms can be found for hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in the table below. Hypoglycemic patients may appear drunk although alcohol may also induce hypoglycemia. You should never discount the possibility that a patient who appears to be drunk may in fact be hypoglycemic. Most patients under the influence of alcohol will have their blood glucose levels recorded at hospital to ensure that they are not hypoglycemic. Hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia is often the presenting feature of diabetes. Patients who have not been diagnosed as diabetics will often go to their doctor complaining of excessive hunger, thirst and urination. On testing their blood glucose levels they are often found to be greater than 20 mmol/l (normal non-diabetics range is 3.0-5.6 mmol/l). Diabetic patients who are hyperglycemic have often been ill for some hours or days and have since deteriorated − most calls for assistance are made when the patient falls unconscious Want to learn more? Our advanced online first aid course contains information on diabetes and a range of other medical conditions. Continue reading >>

How Are Hyperglycemia And Diabetes Connected?

How Are Hyperglycemia And Diabetes Connected?

The term used to describe high blood glucose or blood sugar is hyperglycemia. When we eat food, the carbohydrate in food breaks down into sugar and goes into the bloodstream. The pancreas releases insulin when this happens. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that "unlocks" the body's cells, allowing the sugar go from the blood and into the cells. The cells in the body use this sugar for energy. When the body does not make any or enough insulin, or when the cells are unable to use the insulin correctly, blood sugar levels go up. Contents of this article: Hyperglycemia and diabetes Hyperglycemia is common in people with diabetes. People with prediabetes are also at an increased risk. Prediabetes refers to blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but are not as high as they are for diabetes. Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels two main ways. Either there is a lack of insulin, as is the case with type 1 diabetes, or the body doesn't respond properly to insulin. In prediabetes, it is usually due to the cells not responding correctly. In type 2 diabetes, it is usually a combination. Causes of hyperglycemia There are several causes of hyperglycemia that are related to diabetes: Though many causes are related to diabetes, there are additional factors that can contribute to hyperglycemia: Certain medications such as steroids Other pancreatic diseases Illness and stress can trigger hyperglycemia because the hormones that are produced to combat illness or stress can also cause blood sugar to rise. People do not have to have full-blown diabetes to develop hyperglycemia due to a severe illness. People with diabetes may need to take extra diabetes medication to keep their blood sugar levels stable during illness or stress. Symptoms of hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia Continue reading >>

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