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What Is The Cure For Lactic Acidosis?

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

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Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Publications Published: July 1998 Information on this subject has been updated. Read the most recent information. Dr P Pillans,former Medical Assessor, Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring (CARM), Dunedin Metformin is a useful anti-hyperglycaemic agent but significant mortality is associated with drug-induced lactic acidosis. Significant renal and hepatic disease, alcoholism and conditions associated with hypoxia (eg. cardiac and pulmonary disease, surgery) are contraindications to the use of metformin. Other risk factors for metformin-induced lactic acidosis are sepsis, dehydration, high dosages and increasing age. Metformin remains a major reported cause of drug-associated mortality in New Zealand. Of the 12 cases of lactic acidosis associated with metformin reported to CARM since 1977, 2 occurred in the last year and 8 cases had a fatal outcome. Metformin useful but small risk of potentially fatal lactic acidosis Metformin is a useful therapeutic agent for obese non-insulin dependent diabetics and those whose glycaemia cannot be controlled by sulphonylurea monotherapy. Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect. The reported frequency of lactic acidosis is 0.06 per 1000 patient-years, mostly in patients with predisposing factors.1 Examples of metformin-induced lactic acidosis cases reported to CARM include: A 69-year-old man, with renal and cardiac disease, was prescribed metformin due to failing glycaemic control on glibenclamide monotherapy. He was well for six weeks, then developed lactic acidosis and died within 3 days. Post-surgical lactic acidosis caused the death of a 70-year-old man whose metformin was not withdrawn at the time of surgery. A 56-year-old woman, with no predisposing disease, died from lactic acidosis following major Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise

Lactic acid builds up naturally in the muscles during vigorous activity. Sometimes if we've overdone it during a workout or run, the body can't clear lactic acid or lactate quickly enough, and lactic acid levels build up. Lactic acid can irritate muscles, causing discomfort and soreness. Sore muscles after exercising is called delayed onset muscle soreness or DOMS. Lactic acid is just one cause of DOMS. Because lactic acid is removed from muscles between a few hours to under a day after a workout, it can't be blamed for lasting soreness some days after working out. Cooling down or warming down after exercise can help remove the lactic acid as well as letting the heart rate slow down more gradually. Some severe medical conditions can also cause lactic acidosis, which can be dangerous. During exercise, muscles metabolise glucose (sugar) into energy. Muscles receive glucose continually through the blood, and also have their own stores of sugar (called glycogen). Every person has an upper limit of exercise ability, called the anaerobic threshold or lactate threshold. The lactate threshold is basically a measurement of how fit the heart and blood vessels are. With regular exercise training, a persons lactate threshold goes up. Exercising at an intensity level below the lactate threshold produces very little lactic acid and the body quickly clears what is produced. A person can exercise below the lactate threshold for a long time, even for hours. Once the intensity of exercise exceeds the lactate threshold, muscles begin to use glucose inefficiently, through alternative chemical reactions. Lactic acid is produced and can rapidly build up in the blood and muscles. When a person's exercise intensity crosses the lactate threshold the activity rapidly becomes much more difficult Continue reading >>

How To Remove Extreme Lactic Acid In Legs

How To Remove Extreme Lactic Acid In Legs

How to Remove Extreme Lactic Acid in Legs Andrea Sigust began writing professionally in 1994, authoring user-friendly manuals, reference guides and information sheets while working at a hospital. After years of working in industries ranging from health care to telecommunications, Sigust became a writer. She specializes in the sciences and holds a Bachelor of Science in journalism from the University of Maryland. Relay runners on a trackPhoto Credit: TongRo Images/TongRo Images/Getty Images Lactic acid, which was discovered in the late 1700s, is a substance found in various foods, and is also produced in the human body. There are several medical reasons why excessive amounts of lactic acid exist within your muscles, but the most common cause is vigorous exercise. Extreme lactic acid usually produces discomfort in the legs. Acid removal is a chief concern because even though the discomfort is temporary, it can impact your physical performance. Your body creates lactic acid regularly in small amounts to assist with various biological functions. However, when acid is produced at a rate faster than your body can naturally remove it, the condition is called lactic acidosis. During exercise, this occurs if your exercise intensity is such that your muscles need more fuel than is readily available. According to Scientific American, when your body has run out of oxygen to fuel your muscles, lactic acid buildup occurs as a byproduct of glucose being used as a fuel substitute. The acid buildup causes discomfort, primarily in the form of a burning sensations in your muscles. Once you decrease the intensity of your exercise or stop exercising completely, your body begins to naturally remove the lactic acid. This is because the need for the glucose fuel substitute has diminished, and Continue reading >>

Metformin-induced Lactic Acidosis: No One Left Behind

Metformin-induced Lactic Acidosis: No One Left Behind

Abstract Metformin is a safe drug when correctly used in properly selected patients. In real life, however, associated lactic acidosis has been repeatedly, although rarely, reported. The term metformin-induced lactic acidosis refers to cases that cannot be explained by any major risk factor other than drug accumulation, usually due to renal failure. Treatment consists of vital function support and drug removal, mainly achieved by renal replacement therapy. Despite dramatic clinical presentation, the prognosis of metformin-induced lactic acidosis is usually surprisingly good. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Friesecke and colleagues demonstrate that the survival rate of patients with severe lactic acidosis due to metformin accumulation can be strikingly higher than expected based on the initial clinical evaluation [1]. Metformin is nowadays the first-line drug of choice for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes [2]. This drug is the sixth most frequently prescribed in the USA (> 50 million prescriptions in 2009) and is taken by almost 1.5% of the Italian population [3, 4]. Metformin is a safe drug when correctly used in properly selected patients. In particular, no cases of lactic acidosis (a relatively common side effect of other biguanide compounds) were reported in 347 trials with 70,490 patient-years of metformin use [5]. Real life can differ from research settings, however, and lactic acidosis has been repeatedly, although rarely, observed in patients treated with metformin. The number of inquiries to the Swedish Poison Information Centre for metformin intoxication has increased 10 times during the past decade, with 25 cases of severe lactic acidosis reported in 2007 and 2008 [6]. According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, metform Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Treatment is directed towards correcting the underlying cause of lactic acidosis and optimizing tissue oxygen delivery. The former is addressed by various therapies, including administration of appropriate antibiotics, surgical drainage and debridement of a septic focus, chemotherapy of malignant disorders, discontinuation of causative drugs, and dietary modification in certain types of congenital lactate acidosis. Cardiovascular collapse secondary to hypovolemia or sepsis should be treated with fluid replacement. Both crystalloids and colloids can restore intravascular volume, but hydroxyethyl starch solutions should be avoided owing to increased mortality. [21] Excessive normal saline administration can cause a nongap metabolic acidosis due to hyperchloremia, which has been associated with increased acute kidney injury. [32] Balanced salt solutions such as Ringer lactate and Plasma-Lyte will not cause a nongap metabolic acidosis and may reduce the need for renal replacement therapy; however, these can cause a metabolic alkalosis. [33] No randomized, controlled trial has yet established the safest and most effective crystalloid. If a colloid is indicated, albumin should be used. Despite appropriate fluid management, vasopressors or inotropes may still be required to augment oxygen delivery. Acidemia decreases the response to catecholamines, and higher doses may be needed. Conversely, high doses may exacerbate ischemia in critical tissue beds. Careful dose titration is needed to maximize benefit and reduce harm. Lactic acidosis causes a compensatory increase in minute ventilation. Patients may be tachypneic initially, but respiratory muscle fatigue can ensue rapidly and mechanical ventilation may be necessary. Alkali therapy remains controversial Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Description Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis due to the inadequate clearance of lactic acid from the blood. Lactate is a byproduct of anaerobic respiration and is normally cleared from the blood by the liver, kidney and skeletal muscle. Lactic acidosis occurs when the body's buffering systems are overloaded and tends to cause a pH of ≤7.25 with plasma lactate ≥5 mmol/L. It is usually caused by a state of tissue hypoperfusion and/or hypoxia. This causes pyruvic acid to be preferentially converted to lactate during anaerobic respiration. Hyperlactataemia is defined as plasma lactate >2 mmol/L. Classification Cohen and Woods devised the following system in 1976 and it is still widely used:[1] Type A: lactic acidosis occurs with clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. Type B: lactic acidosis occurs without clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. It is further subdivided into: Type B1: due to underlying disease. Type B2: due to effects of drugs or toxins. Type B3: due to inborn or acquired errors of metabolism. Epidemiology The prevalence is very difficult to estimate, as it occurs in critically ill patients, who are not often suitable subjects for research. It is certainly a common occurrence in patients in high-dependency areas of hospitals.[2] The incidence of symptomatic hyperlactataemia appears to be rising as a consequence of the use of antiretroviral therapy to treat HIV infection. It appears to increase in those taking stavudine (d4T) regimens.[3] Causes of lactic acid Continue reading >>

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Acidosis is a biochemical condition, caused by acid-alkaline imbalance in the body's pH levels, where the acidity of the body fluid is very high. The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance of chemicals (acids and bases) in the body. All foods are digested in the body leaving ash as the result of the digestion. This food ash can be neutral, acid or alkaline, depending largely on the mineral composition of the foods. Some foods leave an acid residue, some alkaline. The acid ash results when there is a depletion of the alkali reserve in the blood and the tissues of the body. When the alkalinity of the blood is reduced, the ability to transport carbon dioxide is reduced. As a result, acid accumalates in the tissues. Acidosis can be classified into respiratory acidosis and metabolic acidosis. When the body is unable to remove carbon dioxide through breathing, it results in respiratory acidosis. Metabolic acidosis occurs when the kidney is not able to remove enough acid from the body. Metabolic acidosis has several types. Diabetic acidosis (Diabetic ketoacidosis) develops when ketone bodies which are acidic build up in the body. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused when too much sodium bicarbonate is lost from the body. Lactic acidosis occurs when there is a build up of lactic acid. Symptoms of Acidosis The general symptoms of acidosis are constant hunger, pain in the pharynx, nausea and vomitting, headaches, various nervous disorders and drowsiness. Chronic acidosis can lead to inflammation of the kidneys, rheumatism, artericlerosis, high BP, skin disorders and other degenerative diseases. It lowers immunity and vitality and makes us prone to the danger of other infections. Causes of Acodosis The main cause of acidosis is wrong diet choices. It mainly occurs because of too many Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic acidosis is a medical condition characterized by the buildup of lactate (especially L-lactate) in the body, which results in an excessively low pH in the bloodstream. It is a form of metabolic acidosis, in which excessive acid accumulates due to a problem with the body's metabolism of lactic acid. Lactic acidosis is typically the result of an underlying acute or chronic medical condition, medication, or poisoning. The symptoms are generally attributable to these underlying causes, but may include nausea, vomiting, rapid deep breathing, and generalised weakness. The diagnosis is made on biochemical analysis of blood (often initially on arterial blood gas samples), and once confirmed, generally prompts an investigation to establish the underlying cause to treat the acidosis. In some situations, hemofiltration (purification of the blood) is temporarily required. In rare chronic forms of lactic acidosis caused by mitochondrial disease, a specific diet or dichloroacetate may be used. The prognosis of lactic acidosis depends largely on the underlying cause; in some situations (such as severe infections), it indicates an increased risk of death. Classification[edit] The Cohen-Woods classification categorizes causes of lactic acidosis as:[1] Type A: Decreased tissue oxygenation (e.g., from decreased blood flow) Type B B1: Underlying diseases (sometimes causing type A) B2: Medication or intoxication B3: Inborn error of metabolism Signs and symptoms[edit] Lactic acidosis is commonly found in people who are unwell, such as those with severe heart and/or lung disease, a severe infection with sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to another cause, severe physical trauma, or severe depletion of body fluids.[2] Symptoms in humans include all those of typical m Continue reading >>

Hiv & Aids Information :: Factsheet Lactic Acidosis

Hiv & Aids Information :: Factsheet Lactic Acidosis

Please enter the email address. Separate multiple addresses with a comma. Lactic acidosis refers to a build-up of lactic acid in the blood. It is a rare but dangerous side-effect of some anti-HIV drugs most of these are no longer in regular use. Your HIV clinic will use blood tests to check your levels of lactic acid. Lacticacidosis is very rare. Nevertheless, it is an important subject to understandbecause people who develop the condition can become dangerously ill. Lacticacidosis is a serious side-effect of the nucleosidereverse transcriptaseinhibitor (NRTI)class of anti-HIV drugs. This class includes abacavir (Ziagen),didanosine (ddI, Videx), lamivudine (3TC, Epivir), stavudine (d4T,Zerit), tenofovir (Viread) andzidovudine (AZT, Retrovir). The drugsmost linked with lactic acidosis are stavudine and didanosine. However, neitherof these drugs is now used if any other treatment options are available, mainlybecause of the side-effects they can cause. Lactic acidosis is also apotential, but rare, side-effect of other drugs, including the commonlyprescribed diabetes drug, metformin. The term lactic acidosis is used to describehigh levels of a substance called lactate in the blood. Lactate is a by-productof the processing of sugar within the body. Lacticacidosis is one of several conditions which are believed to be caused by damage to mitochondria . Mitochondriaare found in all human cells and are involved in the production of energy.Other possible side-effects ofNRTIs which may also be associated withdamage to mitochondria include peripheral neuropathy (numbness or pain in the feetand hands); bone marrow suppression; pancreatitis (inflammation of thepancreas); hepatic steatosis (accumulation of fat in the liver); and myopathy(muscle damage). "Lactic acidosis may occurat a Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise: What You Need To Know

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise: What You Need To Know

Muscle ache, burning, rapid breathing, nausea, stomach pain: If you've experienced the unpleasant feeling of lactic acidosis, you likely remember it. It's temporary. It happens when too much acid builds up in your bloodstream. The most common reason it happens is intense exercise. Symptoms The symptoms may include a burning feeling in your muscles, cramps, nausea, weakness, and feeling exhausted. It's your body's way to tell you to stop what you're doing The symptoms happen in the moment. The soreness you sometimes feel in your muscles a day or two after an intense workout isn't from lactic acidosis. It's your muscles recovering from the workout you gave them. Intense Exercise. When you exercise, your body uses oxygen to break down glucose for energy. During intense exercise, there may not be enough oxygen available to complete the process, so a substance called lactate is made. Your body can convert this lactate to energy without using oxygen. But this lactate or lactic acid can build up in your bloodstream faster than you can burn it off. The point when lactic acid starts to build up is called the "lactate threshold." Some medical conditions can also bring on lactic acidosis, including: Vitamin B deficiency Shock Some drugs, including metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes, and all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS can cause lactic acidosis. If you are on any of these medications and have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get medical help immediately. Preventing Lactic Acidosis Begin any exercise routine gradually. Pace yourself. Don't go from being a couch potato to trying to run a marathon in a week. Start with an aerobic exercise like running or fast walking. You can build up your pace and distance slowly. Increase the Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatment

Lactic Acidosis: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatment

Lactic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much lactic acid and cannot metabolize it quickly enough. The condition can be a medical emergency. The onset of lactic acidosis might be rapid and occur within minutes or hours, or gradual, happening over a period of days. The best way to treat lactic acidosis is to find out what has caused it. Untreated lactic acidosis can result in severe and life-threatening complications. In some instances, these can escalate rapidly. It is not necessarily a medical emergency when caused by over-exercising. The prognosis for lactic acidosis will depend on its underlying cause. A blood test is used to diagnose the condition. Lactic acidosis symptoms that may indicate a medical emergency include a rapid heart rate and disorientaiton. Typically, symptoms of lactic acidosis do not stand out as distinct on their own but can be indicative of a variety of health issues. However, some symptoms known to occur in lactic acidosis indicate a medical emergency. Lactic acidosis can occur in people whose kidneys are unable to get rid of excess acid. Even when not related to just a kidney condition, some people's bodies make too much lactic acid and are unable to balance it out. Diabetes increases the risk of developing lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis may develop in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus , especially if their diabetes is not well controlled. There have been reports of lactic acidosis in people who take metformin, which is a standard non-insulin medication for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the incidence is low, with equal to or less than 10 cases per 100,000 patient-years of using the drug, according to a 2014 report in the journal Metabolism. The incidence of lactic acidosis is higher in people with diabetes who Continue reading >>

Sodium Bicarbonate For The Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis - Sciencedirect

Sodium Bicarbonate For The Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis - Sciencedirect

Volume 117, Issue 1 , January 2000, Pages 260-267 Sodium Bicarbonate for the Treatment of Lactic Acidosis Author links open overlay panel Sean M.ForsytheMDa Gregory A.SchmidtMD, FCCPb Get rights and content Lactic acidosis often challenges the intensivist and is associatedwith a strikingly high mortality. Treatment involves discerning andcorrecting its underlying cause, ensuring adequate oxygen delivery totissues, reducing oxygen demand through sedation and mechanicalventilation, and (most controversially) attempting to alkalinize theblood with IV sodium bicarbonate. Here we review the literature toanswer the following questions: Is a low pH bad? Can sodium bicarbonateraise the pH in vivo? Does increasing the blood pH withsodium bicarbonate have any salutary effects? Does sodium bicarbonatehave negative side effects? We find that the oft-cited rationale forbicarbonate use, that it might ameliorate the hemodynamic depression ofmetabolic acidemia, has been disproved convincingly. Further, given thelack of evidence supporting its use, we cannot condone bicarbonateadministration for patients with lactic acidosis, regardless of thedegree of acidemia. Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis that begins in the kidneys. People with lactic acidosis have kidneys that are unable to remove excess acid from their body. If lactic acid builds up in the body more quickly than it can be removed, acidity levels in bodily fluids — such as blood — spike. This buildup of acid causes an imbalance in the body’s pH level, which should always be slightly alkaline instead of acidic. There are a few different types of acidosis. Lactic acid buildup occurs when there’s not enough oxygen in the muscles to break down glucose and glycogen. This is called anaerobic metabolism. There are two types of lactic acid: L-lactate and D-lactate. Most forms of lactic acidosis are caused by too much L-lactate. Lactic acidosis has many causes and can often be treated. But if left untreated, it may be life-threatening. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are typical of many health issues. If you experience any of these symptoms, you should contact your doctor immediately. Your doctor can help determine the root cause. Several symptoms of lactic acidosis represent a medical emergency: fruity-smelling breath (a possible indication of a serious complication of diabetes, called ketoacidosis) confusion jaundice (yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes) trouble breathing or shallow, rapid breathing If you know or suspect that you have lactic acidosis and have any of these symptoms, call 911 or go to an emergency room right away. Other lactic acidosis symptoms include: exhaustion or extreme fatigue muscle cramps or pain body weakness overall feelings of physical discomfort abdominal pain or discomfort diarrhea decrease in appetite headache rapid heart rate Lactic acidosis has a wide range of underlying causes, including carbon monoxide poisoni Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis.

Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis.

Severe lactic acidosis is often associated with poor prognosis. Recognition and correction of the underlying process is the major step in the treatment of this serious condition. Intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate has been the mainstay in the treatment of lactic acidosis. Aggressive use of this therapeutic modality, however, can lead to serious complications and should therefore be considered with caution. Peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis provide large amounts of alkali without causing the hypernatremia or hypervolemia commonly associated with bicarbonate infusion. Peritoneal dialysis with bicarbonate-based dialysate, in particular, appears to be an ideal means of delivering physiologic buffer. Administration of methylene blue was initially thought to increase lactate metabolism by altering the cellular oxidative state. Its subsequent clinical use, however, showed little efficacy. Sodium nitroprusside has been advocated for the treatment of some forms of lactic acidosis as a method of alleviating regional hypoperfusion. Insulin therapy has been found to be quite useful in the treatment of phenformin-associated lactic acidosis and is recommended in this setting. Since dichloroacetate activates pyruvate dehydrogenase and enhances lactate metabolism, it may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of lactic acidosis. Continue reading >>

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