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What Is The Compensation For Respiratory Acidosis?

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Respiratory Acidosis

Practice Essentials Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [1] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3–)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis, Metabolic Acidosis, and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis.) Acute vs chronic respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis can be acut Continue reading >>

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  1. JustGarlic

    Since I found out I have diabetes about a month ago, I have, of course changed the way I am eating... Basically I stay under 50 a day..... my readings have been fine, so I know I am doing OK that way.... but from what I have read, I am not all the rest of you folks....
    Instead of feeling full or satiated, I feel like I am CONSTANTLY hungry. I'm eating about 2000 calories a day and working out some as of the last week or so. ( I have a back issue that is really screwing me up for exercise.... before this back issue I was far more active and fit...... the issue is now in month 14, and getting better, but is still painful.
    Anyway, I feel hungry and want to eat more, but my scale isn't moving down even at 2000.
    What I find strange is that when I was eating carbs a month ago, I was holding steady in weight at 3000 calories a day.
    I log and weigh everything, and I use the LoseIt website to keep track of everything.
    Why am I so hungry? And why have I not dropped more than 2 pounds this month when you consider I cut calories by 1000 a day, AND went from 300 - 400 carbs a day down to under 50?
    It's getting so that I am afraid to eat vegetables for crying out loud..... even low GI veggies.

  2. Forester

    I use the Lose It! app on my iPhone. It should give you relative proportions of the macronutrients you are eating if you are recording everything. That is, percentage of carb, fat, and protein. If you mean 50 as the number of grams of carbs you are eating, that should be a good amount for weight loss. The next question is how much protein are you eating? How much fat? If you are eating a high protein diet, much of that will be converted to glucose, and then to fat, preventing weight loss. My guess is that you are not eating high fat, and you may be eating too much protein. Try upping your fat intake, and see what that does to your hunger pangs.

  3. Ela

    I am not sure what's going on and why you're not losing weight and I think Forester here is probably right. As of being hungry all the time - it's possible your body is not adjusted yet to the new regimen.
    I just wanted to comment on the other aspect. I don't believe in weight loss anymore. I mean - it might be easier for your body in whole to be leaner and all that, but I don't believe that weight loss helps to control diabetes all that much if at all. You said it yourself - your BG numbers ARE BETTER.

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Acid Base Disorders

Arterial blood gas analysis is used to determine the adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation, assess respiratory function and determine the acid–base balance. These data provide information regarding potential primary and compensatory processes that affect the body’s acid–base buffering system. Interpret the ABGs in a stepwise manner: Determine the adequacy of oxygenation (PaO2) Normal range: 80–100 mmHg (10.6–13.3 kPa) Determine pH status Normal pH range: 7.35–7.45 (H+ 35–45 nmol/L) pH <7.35: Acidosis is an abnormal process that increases the serum hydrogen ion concentration, lowers the pH and results in acidaemia. pH >7.45: Alkalosis is an abnormal process that decreases the hydrogen ion concentration and results in alkalaemia. Determine the respiratory component (PaCO2) Primary respiratory acidosis (hypoventilation) if pH <7.35 and HCO3– normal. Normal range: PaCO2 35–45 mmHg (4.7–6.0 kPa) PaCO2 >45 mmHg (> 6.0 kPa): Respiratory compensation for metabolic alkalosis if pH >7.45 and HCO3– (increased). PaCO2 <35 mmHg (4.7 kPa): Primary respiratory alkalosis (hyperventilation) if pH >7.45 and HCO3– normal. Respiratory compensation for metabolic acidosis if pH Continue reading >>

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  1. mikki

    this perplexes me......i keep reading it everywhere and it hurts my brain....
    exercise (activity) depletes glycogen, muscle uses more energy (food or fat stores)....what am i missing?
    is it just verbiage? "weight" (scale) vs fat (composition)?

    please enlighten me

  2. Bartdorman

    read this...

  3. Dmes10

    I've heard this "exercise thing" called Keto in fast forward.

    I think it helps to maintain good strong ketone production. But definitely not a sole tool in the quest for weight loss IMHO.

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(fully compensated, uncompensated,& partially compensated) tick tack toe trick

Compensated Respiratory Acidosis

Definition In a compensated respiratory acidosis, although the PCO2 is high, the pH is within normal range. The kidneys compensate for a respiratory acidosis by tubular cells reabsorbing more HCO3 from the tubular fluid, collecting duct cells secreting more H+ and generating more HCO3, and ammoniagenesis leading to increased formation of the NH3 buffer. Compensated respiratory acidosis is typically the result of a chronic condition, the slow nature of onset giving the kidneys time to compensate. Common causes of respiratory acidosis include hypoventilation due to: Respiratory depression (sedatives, narcotics, CVA, etc.) Respiratory muscle paralysis (spinal cord injury, Guillan-Barre, residual paralytics). Chest wall disorders (flail chest, pneumothorax) Lung parenchyma disorders (ARDS, pneumonia, COPD, CHF, aspiration) Abdominal distension (laporoscopic surgery, ascites, obesity, etc.). Subspecialty Keyword history Similar Keyword: Respiratory acidosis: Compensation Sources Miller’s Anesthesia, 7th ed. Ch. 49. PubMed Continue reading >>

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  1. Ginaoo

    I have no clue where to find those keto sticks everyone is talking about. Can anyone help?

  2. cfine

    I order mine online

  3. LiterateGriffin

    Go to an ACTUAL drug store -- like Rite Aid or CVS -- and look near the diabetic supplies. Grocery-store pharmacies generally won't stock them, but "real" drug stores always carry them.
    Go ahead & buy the (cheaper) generic brands. They all work great.

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