diabetestalk.net

What Is Respiratory Acidosis

For Patients And Visitors

For Patients And Visitors

Definition Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially the blood, to become too acidic. Alternative Names Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory Causes Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scarring and thickening of the lungs) Diseases of the chest (such as scoliosis) Diseases affecting the nerves and muscles that signal the lungs to inflate or deflate Drugs that suppress breathing (including powerful pain medicines, such as narcotics, and "downers," such as benzodiazepines), often when combined with alcohol Severe obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over a long time. This leads to a stable situation, because the kidneys increase body chemicals, such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can return the body to a state of balance. Some people with chronic respiratory acidosis get acute respiratory acidosis because an illness makes their condition worse. Symptoms Symptoms may include: Lethargy Shortness of breath Exams and Tests The health care provider will perform a physical exam and ask about symptoms. Tests that may be done include: Arterial blood gas, which measures oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the blood Basic metabolic panel Chest x-ray CT scan of the chest Pulmonary function test to measure breathing and how well the lungs are functioning Treatment Treatment is aimed at the underlying disea Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis Definition Respiratory acidosis is a condition in which a build-up of carbon dioxide in the blood produces a shift in the body's pH balance and causes the body's system to become more acidic. This condition is brought about by a problem either involving the lungs and respiratory system or signals from the brain that control breathing. Description Respiratory acidosis is an acid imbalance in the body caused by a problem related to breathing. In the lungs, oxygen from inhaled air is exchanged for carbon dioxide from the blood. This process takes place between the alveoli (tiny air pockets in the lungs) and the blood vessels that connect to them. When this exchange of oxygen for carbon dioxide is impaired, the excess carbon dioxide forms an acid in the blood. The condition can be acute with a sudden onset, or it can develop gradually as lung function deteriorates. Causes and symptoms Respiratory acidosis can be caused by diseases or conditions that affect the lungs themselves, such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, or severe pneumonia. Blockage of the airway due to swelling, a foreign object, or vomit can induce respiratory acidosis. Drugs like anesthetics, sedatives, and narcotics can interfere with breathing by depressing the respiratory center in the brain. Head injuries or brain tumors can also interfere with signals sent by the brain to the lungs. Such neuromuscular diseases as Guillain-Barré syndrome or myasthenia gravis can impair the muscles around the lungs making it more difficult to breathe. Conditions that cause chronic metabolic alkalosis can also trigger respiratory acidosis. The most notable symptom will be slowed or difficult breathing. Headache, drowsiness, restlessness, tremor, and confusion may also occur. A rapid heart rate Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis Nclex Review Notes

Respiratory Acidosis Nclex Review Notes

Are you studying respiratory acidosis and need to know a mnemonic on how to remember the causes? This article will give you a clever mnemonic and simplify the signs and symptoms and nursing interventions on how to remember respiratory acidosis for nursing lecture exams and NCLEX. In addition, you will learn how to differentiate respiratory acidosis from respiratory alkalosis. Don’t forget to take the respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis quiz. This article will cover: Sequence of normal breathing Patho of respiratory acidosis Causes of respiratory acidosis Signs and symptoms of respiratory acidosis Nursing interventions for respiratory acidosis Lecture on Respiratory Acidosis Respiratory Acidosis What’s involved:…let’s look at normal breathing: Oxygen enters through the mouth or nose down through the Pharynx into the Larynx (the throat) then into the Trachea and the Bronchus (right and left) which branches into the bronchioles and ends in alveoli sac *The alveolar sacs are where gas exchange takes place (oxygen and carbon dioxide diffuse across the membrane). The oxygen enters into your blood stream and CARBON DIOXIDE CO2 is exhaled through your nose or mouth. The diaphragm also plays a role in allowing lungs into inflate and deflate. Note: if there is any problem with the patient breathing rate (too slow), alveolar sacs (damaged), or diaphragm (weak) the patient can experience respiratory acidosis. *Main cause of respiratory acidosis is bradypnea (slow respiratory rate <12 bpm which causes CO2 to build-up in the lungs) When this happens the following lab values are affected: Blood pH decreases (<7.35) Carbon dioxide levels increase (>45) **To compensate for this the Kidneys start to conserve bicarbonate (HCO3) to hopefully increase the blood’s pH bac Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis can arise from a break in any one of these links. For example, it can be caused from depression of the respiratory center through drugs or metabolic disease, or from limitations in chest wall expansion due to neuromuscular disorders or trauma (Table 90-1). It can also arise from pulmonary disease, card iog en ic pu lmon a ryedema, a spira tion of a foreign body or vomitus, pneumothorax and pleural space disease, or through mechanical hypoventilation. Unless there is a superimposed or secondary metabolic acidosis, the plasma anion gap will usually be normal in respiratory acidosis. Introduction Respiratory acidosis is characterized by an increased arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The major cause of respiratory acidosis is alveolar hypoventilation. The expected physiologic response is an increased PHCO3. The increase in concentration of bicarbonate ions (HCO3) in plasma (PHCO3) is tiny in patients with acute respiratory acidosis, but is much larger in patients with chronic respiratory acidosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation and is characterized by a low arterial blood PCO2 and H+ ion concentration. The expected physiologic response is a decrease in PHCO3. As in respiratory acidosis, this response is modest in patients with acute respiratory alkalosis and much larger in patients with chronic respiratory alkalosis. Although respiratory acid-base disorders are detected by measurement of PCO2 and pH in arterial blood and may reveal the presence of a serious underlying disease process that affected ventilation, it is important to recognize the effect of changes in capillary blood PCO2 in the different organs on the binding of H+ ions to intracellular proteins, which may change their charge, shape, and possibly their funct Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes And Regulation

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes And Regulation

This lesson will discuss an important relationship between the kidneys and the lungs and how both of them play a role in respiratory acidosis. We'll also discuss some of the major causes of respiratory acidosis. Mutualistic Relationships A mutualistic relationship refers typically to a couple of different species of animals helping one another out. Take, for example, the birds that clean an alligator's teeth. The alligator gets a free dental exam, no insurance necessary, and the birds get a nice meal. It's really weird in a way that a bird and a reptile would rely on one another. They are just so different in terms of their size, function, and appearance, but their relationship is nonetheless very important. Well, the kidneys have a relationship with the lungs that is equally weird but important. I mean, the lungs are much bigger, look totally different, and don't seem to be related to the kidneys at all! But these two organ systems are in a very important mutualistic relationship, only one fourth of which can be discussed in this lesson. A Couple of Important Terms Before we get to everything, I want to clarify some terms. 'Acidemia' refers to an abnormally low pH of the blood. pH is inversely proportional to the concentration of H+ (hydrogen ions, aka protons). Hydrogen ions confer acidity upon a substance. So if we raise the concentration of hydrogen, we actually lower the pH. Acidemia is a result of acidosis. 'Acidosis' refers to a pathological state or process that leads to acidemia. We'll be using these terms later, so keep them in mind. To help remember that acid has a low pH, just think about the fact that gastric acid sits 'down' in your stomach. Therefore, something acidic moves 'down' the pH scale. Respiratory Acidosis Okay, with that out of the way for a bit Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Practice Essentials Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [1] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3–)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis, Metabolic Acidosis, and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis.) Acute vs chronic respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (ie, >45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (ie, pH < 7.35). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate levels (ie, >30 mEq/L). Acute respiratory acidosis is present when an abrupt failure of ventilation occurs. This failure in ventilation may result from depression of the central respiratory center by one or another of the foll Continue reading >>

Compensated Respiratory Acidosis

Compensated Respiratory Acidosis

Definition In a compensated respiratory acidosis, although the PCO2 is high, the pH is within normal range. The kidneys compensate for a respiratory acidosis by tubular cells reabsorbing more HCO3 from the tubular fluid, collecting duct cells secreting more H+ and generating more HCO3, and ammoniagenesis leading to increased formation of the NH3 buffer. Compensated respiratory acidosis is typically the result of a chronic condition, the slow nature of onset giving the kidneys time to compensate. Common causes of respiratory acidosis include hypoventilation due to: Respiratory depression (sedatives, narcotics, CVA, etc.) Respiratory muscle paralysis (spinal cord injury, Guillan-Barre, residual paralytics). Chest wall disorders (flail chest, pneumothorax) Lung parenchyma disorders (ARDS, pneumonia, COPD, CHF, aspiration) Abdominal distension (laporoscopic surgery, ascites, obesity, etc.). Subspecialty Keyword history Similar Keyword: Respiratory acidosis: Compensation Sources Miller’s Anesthesia, 7th ed. Ch. 49. PubMed Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

DEFINITION Respiratory acidosis = a primary acid-base disorder in which arterial pCO2 rises to an abnormally high level. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY arterial pCO2 is normally maintained at a level of about 40 mmHg by a balance between production of CO2 by the body and its removal by alveolar ventilation. PaCO2 is proportional to VCO2/VA VCO2 = CO2 production by the body VA = alveolar ventilation an increase in arterial pCO2 can occur by one of three possible mechanisms: presence of excess CO2 in the inspired gas decreased alveolar ventilation increased production of CO2 by the body CAUSES Inadequate Alveolar Ventilation central respiratory depression drug depression of respiratory centre (eg by opiates, sedatives, anaesthetics) neuromuscular disorders lung or chest wall defects airway obstruction inadequate mechanical ventilation Over-production of CO2 -> hypercatabolic disorders Malignant hyperthermia Thyroid storm Phaeochromocytoma Early sepsis Liver failure Increased Intake of Carbon Dioxide Rebreathing of CO2-containing expired gas Addition of CO2 to inspired gas Insufflation of CO2 into body cavity (eg for laparoscopic surgery) EFFECTS CO2 is lipid soluble -> depressing effects on intracellular metabolism RESP increased minute ventilation via both central and peripheral chemoreceptors CVS increased sympathetic tone peripheral vasodilation by direct effect on vessels acutely the acidosis will cause a right shift of the oxygen dissociation curve if the acidosis persists, a decrease in red cell 2,3 DPG occurs which shifts the curve back to the left CNS cerebral vasodilation increasing cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure central depression at very high levels of pCO2 potent stimulation of ventilation this can result in dyspnoea, disorientation, acute confusion, headache, Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of Respiratory Acidosis

Evaluation Of Respiratory Acidosis

Diagnostic Approach Once respiratory acidosis has been identified by ABG analysis, the approach to narrowing the differential diagnosis and determining the severity of the patient's condition is aided by the identification of its acuity (acute or chronic). This is done through the synthesis of information from the ABG itself, history, and physical exam. [8] Historical findings may immediately point to the underlying cause, such as head trauma and drug ingestion, or provide only limited information, as with the obtunded patient. The physical exam should focus on assessment of the neurologic and respiratory systems with careful examination of the lung fields, which can yield useful information regarding the presence of underlying parenchymal disease. Further laboratory studies are warranted when metabolic abnormalities or specific systemic diseases are suspected etiologies. Radiographic imaging is key to the evaluation of respiratory acidosis, as it can provide rapid screening for head, cervical, or chest pathology. ABG analysis Step 1: Is there acidosis? Acidosis is indicated by an arterial blood gas pH below the normal range (i.e., <7.35) Step 2: Respiratory or metabolic? Respiratory acidosis is indicated by an increase in the arterial carbon dioxide levels above the normal range of 35 to 45 mmHg (4.7-6.0 kPa). It is important to note that the degree of acidosis and the potential concerns are different depending on whether the problem is respiratory or metabolic. An equivalent pH in metabolic acidosis (e.g., 7.0) is a much worse clinical sign, as the body has dual buffering and compensatory mechanisms for metabolic acid (the carbamate-bicarbonate system: bicarbonate buffer, and carbon dioxide elimination). Elevated carbon dioxide, on the other hand, causes a dramatic fa Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is primary increase in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2) with or without compensatory increase in bicarbonate (HCO3−); pH is usually low but may be near normal. Cause is a decrease in respiratory rate and/or volume (hypoventilation), typically due to CNS, pulmonary, or iatrogenic conditions. Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic; the chronic form is asymptomatic, but the acute, or worsening, form causes headache, confusion, and drowsiness. Signs include tremor, myoclonic jerks, and asterixis. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurements. The cause is treated; oxygen (O2) and mechanical ventilation are often required. Respiratory acidosis is carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation (hypercapnia) due to a decrease in respiratory rate and/or respiratory volume (hypoventilation). Causes of hypoventilation (discussed under Ventilatory Failure) include Hypoxia typically accompanies hypoventilation. Respiratory acidosis may be acute or chronic. Distinction is based on the degree of metabolic compensation; CO2 is initially buffered inefficiently, but over 3 to 5 days the kidneys increase HCO3− reabsorption significantly. Treatment is provision of adequate ventilation by either endotracheal intubation or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (for specific indications and procedures, see Overview of Respiratory Failure). Adequate ventilation is all that is needed to correct respiratory acidosis, although chronic hypercapnia generally must be corrected slowly (eg, over several hours or more), because too-rapid Pco2lowering can cause a posthypercapnic “overshoot” alkalosis when the underlying compensatory hyperbicarbonatemia becomes unmasked; the abrupt rise in CNS pH that results can lead to seizures and death. Any pot Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s , and . A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2008 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis, which causes scarring and thickening of the lungs) Diseases of the chest (such as scoliosis) Diseases affecting the nerves and muscles that signal the lungs to inflate or deflate Drugs that suppress breathing (including powerful pain medicines, such as narcotics, and "downers," such as benzodiazepines), often when combined with alcohol Severe obesity, which restricts how much the lungs can expand Obstructive sleep apnea Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over a long time. This leads to a stable situation, because the kidneys increase body chemicals, such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can return the body to a state of balance. Some people with chronic respiratory acidosis get acute respiratory acidosis because an illness makes their condition worse. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis As A Consequence Of Pulmonary Edema

Respiratory Acidosis As A Consequence Of Pulmonary Edema

Hyperventilation manifested by a low arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) is a common feature of pulmonary venous congestion (1-3). This is also commonly the case in frank pulmonary edema, when significant lowering of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) may also be present (3, 4). However, severe pulmonary edema imposes considerable mechanical restriction on the lungs (5, 6), and it would not be surprising if hypoventilation became a problem in such instances. Indeed, several patients have been reported showing mild carbon dioxide retention (4, 7), and it has been said that PaCO2 rises sharply in the terminal stages of pulmonary edema (2). Continue reading >>

4.2 Respiratory Acidosis - Causes

4.2 Respiratory Acidosis - Causes

Acid-Base Physiology The arterial pCO2 is normally maintained at a level of about 40 mmHg by a balance between production of CO2 by the body and its removal by alveolar ventilation. If the inspired gas contains no CO2 then this relationship can be expressed by: paCO2 is proportional to VCO2 / VA where: VCO2 is CO2 production by the body VA is Alveolar ventilation An increase in arterial pCO2 can occur by one of three possible mechanisms: Presence of excess CO2 in the inspired gas Decreased alveolar ventilation Increased production of CO2 by the body CO2 gas can be added to the inspired gas or it may be present because of rebreathing : Anaesthetists are familiar with both these mechanisms. In these situations, hypercapnia can be induced even in the presence of normal alveolar ventilation and normal carbon dioxide production by the body. An adult at rest produces about 200mls of CO2 per minute: this is excreted via the lungs and the arterial pCO2 remains constant. An increased production of CO2 would lead to a respiratory acidosis if ventilation remained constant. The system controlling arterial pCO2 is very efficient (ie rapid and effective) and any increase in pCO2 very promptly results in a large increase in ventilation. The result is that increased CO2 production almost never results in respiratory acidosis. It is only in situations where ventilation is fixed that increased production will cause respiratory acidosis. Examples of this would be a ventilated patient who develops acute malignant hyperthermia: the arterial pCO2 will rise unless the alveolar ventilation is substantially increased. Most cases of respiratory acidosis are due to decreased alveolar ventilation. The defect leading to this can occur at any level in the respiratory control mechanism. This provides Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesn’t cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of Continue reading >>

More in ketosis