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What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

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What is BASAL METABOLIC RATE? What does BASAL METABOLIC RATE mean? BASAL METABOLIC RATE meaning - BASAL METABOLIC RATE definition - BASAL METABOLIC RATE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the minimal rate of energy expenditure per unit time by endothermic animals at rest. It is reported in energy units per unit time ranging from watt (joule/second) to ml O2/min or joule per hour per kg body mass J/(hkg)). Proper measurement requires a strict set of criteria be met. These criteria include being in a physically and psychologically undisturbed state, in a thermally neutral environment, while in the post-absorptive state (i.e., not actively digesting food). In bradymetabolic animals, such as fish and reptiles, the equivalent term standard metabolic rate (SMR) is used. It follows the same criteria as BMR, but requires the documentation of the temperature at which the metabolic rate was measured. This makes BMR a variant of standard metabolic rate measurement that excludes the temperature data, a practice that has led to problems in defining "standard" rates of metabolism for many mammals. Metabolism comprises the processes that the body needs to function. Basal metabolic rate is the amount of energy expressed in calories that a person needs to keep the body functioning at rest. Some of those processes are breathing, blood circulation, controlling body temperature, cell growth, brain and nerve function, and contraction of muscles. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) affects the rate that a person burns calories and ultimately whether that individual maintains, gains, or loses weight. The basal metabolic rate accounts for about 60 to 75% of the daily calorie expenditure by individuals. It is influenced by several factors. BMR typically declines by 12% per decade after age 20, mostly due to loss of fat-free mass, although the variability between individuals is high. The body's generation of heat is known as thermogenesis and it can be measured to determine the amount of energy expended. BMR generally decreases with age and with the decrease in lean body mass (as may happen with aging). Increasing muscle mass has the effect of increasing BMR. Aerobic (resistance) fitness level, a product of cardiovascular exercise, while previously thought to have effect on BMR, has been shown in the 1990s not to correlate with BMR when adjusted for fat-free body mass. But anaerobic exercise does increase resting energy consumption (see "aerobic vs. anaerobic exercise"). Illness, previously consumed food and beverages, environmental temperature, and stress levels can affect one's overall energy expenditure as well as one's BMR. BMR is measured under very restrictive circumstances when a person is awake. An accurate BMR measurement requires that the person's sympathetic nervous system not be stimulated, a condition which requires complete rest. A more common measurement, which uses less strict criteria, is resting metabolic rate (RMR).

Metabolic Acidosis

Practice Essentials Metabolic acidosis is a clinical disturbance characterized by an increase in plasma acidity. Metabolic acidosis should be considered a sign of an underlying disease process. Identification of this underlying condition is essential to initiate appropriate therapy. (See Etiology, DDx, Workup, and Treatment.) Understanding the regulation of acid-base balance requires appreciation of the fundamental definitions and principles underlying this complex physiologic process. Go to Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis and Emergent Management of Metabolic Acidosis for complete information on those topics. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. [deleted]

    For the last week I've stayed awake every other night and then slept about 13 hours. I feel like my mind is hyper alert on keto and I can't sleep because of it. Tonight I ran a mile before I was to go asleep and as soon as my breathing and heart rate returned to normal I felt even more alert.
    I feel normal cognitively until about 36 hours without sleep so it hasn't affected my ability to do my job.
    Anyone else have this problem on keto? Edit: I've been in ketosis for about 5 weeks if that's relevant at all.

  2. sketchymurr

    Any changes in your nutrient intake? Potassium, magnesium, salt being the big ones.
    When I slack on mag and salt, after a few days, I start sleeping poorly and being far more alert if I wake up in the middle of the night to pee than I really should be. (Like wide awake to the point I could coherently drive across the state or something, which is terrifying when I just got three hours of sleep and I'm exhausted all at once, hah.)

  3. [deleted]

    I tend to never add salt to my food other nosalt(potassium chloride), my fitness pal puts my sodium/potassium amount s to a near 1:1 ratio. And I take a magnesium tablet daily.
    The only change is I just stopped my final course of antibiotics for a brown recluse bite.

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis.

Abstract Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortal Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Emacfarland

    I'm confused about what defines being in nutritional ketosis based on blood levels. The Diet Doctor website says 1.5 is considered ketosis while I've heard on Keto Talk from Doc Nally that fit and active people can be in ketosis at levels of .3 or .4 and that higher levels don't necessarily mean better. So I'm not sure what the heck I'm aiming for! If I get readings below 1.5 am I doing something wrong? I am fit and active and Doc Nally has said this can make blood ketone level readings lower because an active persons body is using the ketones more efficiently. Should I be aiming for higher levels?

  2. BillJay

    It seems that the longer someone is keto-adapted, the more their body produces just the right amount of ketones and what we measure in the blood is only what's not actually being used, therefore it seems not only possible, but likely that people are in ketosis even with lower betahydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels - the ketone in the blood that these meters measure.
    This is somewhat frustrating for me since I'd like for there to be an objective measurement of being in ketosis, but that seems to be elusive.
    Therefore, a better indication is your level of carbs since it is HIGHLY unlikely that anything over 50 carbs is in ketosis and more likely that keeping carbs under 20 grams is a safe bet. Another indication is keeping protein at moderate levels which is 1.0 to 1.5 grams per kilogram of lean body weight.
    Once the macro-nutrients are in the proper range, I think that signs of keto-adapation are more poignant and below is a post from Mark Sisson on Dr. Mercola's site that explains many of the signs of being keto-adapted.

    What Does It Mean to Be Fat Adapted?
    543

  3. richard

    Dr Phinney invented the term so he gets to define it.
    In his book "The art and science of low carbohydrate living" he gives the range from 0.5 to 3.0 mmol/l
    But recently he mentioned that some of Dr Volek's very athletic subjects were clearly in ketosis at 0.2 mmol/l.
    My personal range is from 0.2 to 0.8 mmol/l, and I have been in ketosis for almost 3 years. Prof Tim Noakes is also normally in the same range 0.2-0.8.
    I suspect when we first start we aren't good at using them so we make too many and use too little so we end up with a lot left in our blood. After we become better adapted we end up in whatever physiological range our bodys feel best ensures our survival. And people who are trained and good fat burners may be able to get away with less because they can make it easily.
    When I fast for 3 days and then do 3 hours of exercise my ketones can go as high as 3.5. But I know people who regularly get up to 7.
    It's worth pointing out that Dr Nally has mentioned in his most recent podcast that he eats exogenous ketones 3 times a day. And he sells them.

    Personally I wouldn't be worried. I think you are doing fine.

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Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Abstract The utility of bicarbonate administration to patients with severe metabolic acidosis remains controversial. Chronic bicarbonate replacement is obviously indicated for patients who continue to lose bicarbonate in the ambulatory setting, particularly patients with renal tubular acidosis syndromes or diarrhea. In patients with acute lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis, lactate and ketone bodies can be converted back to bicarbonate if the clinical situation improves. For these patients, therapy must be individualized. In general, bicarbonate should be given at an arterial blood pH of ≤7.0. The amount given should be what is calculated to bring the pH up to 7.2. The urge to give bicarbonate to a patient with severe acidemia is apt to be all but irresistible. Intervention should be restrained, however, unless the clinical situation clearly suggests benefit. Here we discuss the pros and cons of bicarbonate therapy for patients with severe metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis is an acid-base disorder characterized by a primary consumption of body buffers including a fall in blood bicarbonate concentration. There are many causes (Table 1), and there are multiple mechanisms that mi Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. jarryd2018

    Will I feel when I'm in ketosis?

    Thread title.

  2. shadowwalker021

    yep. especially if this is your first time. you will feel tired and sluggish. irritable, weak, and moody. you'll get headaches, cramps, and experience "brain fog". your breath and urine will smell like fruit. most people say they get a metallic taste in their mouth (i never experienced this as i have never eaten metal before so i don't know what it tastes like).
    after about 2-3 weeks you will suddenly feel awesome and you will have more energy than you've probably ever experienced in your life.

  3. alex2363

    its bad at 1st, but we all have gone with colds/flu all our lives, its like a mini flu or cold, if you can survive a cold then u can survive few days/weeks of this mini cold/flu...its worht it.

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