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What Is Ketosis From Starvation?

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

How Does The Body Adapt To Starvation?

How Does The Body Adapt To Starvation?

- [Instructor] In this video, I want to explore the question of how does our body adapt to periods of prolonged starvation. So in order to answer this question, I actually think it's helpful to remind ourselves first of a golden rule of homeostasis inside of our body. So in order to survive, remember that our body must be able to maintain proper blood glucose levels. I'm gonna go ahead and write we must be able to maintain glucose levels in our blood, and this is important even in periods of prolonged starvation, because it turns out that we need to maintain glucose levels above a certain concentration in order to survive, even if that concentration is lower than normal. And this of course brings up the question, well, how does our body maintain blood glucose levels? So let's go ahead and answer this question by starting off small. Let's say we have a mini case of starvation, let's say three or four hours after a meal. Your blood glucose levels begin to drop, and so what does your body do to resolve that? Well, at this point, it has a quick and easy solution. It turns to its glycogen stores in the liver. Remember that our body stores up these strings of glucose inside of our body so that we can easily pump it back into the blood when we're not eating. But unfortunately humans only have enough glycogen stores to last us about a day, so after a day of starvation, our body's pretty much reliant exclusively on the metabolic pathways involved in gluconeogenesis, which if you remember is the pathway by which we produce new or neo glucose. And we produce this glucose from non-carbohydrate precursor molecules. So let's think about what else we have in our body. Remember that our other two major storage fuels are fats, and we usually think about fatty acids containing most of th Continue reading >>

How To Use Ketosis For Hunger Suppression

How To Use Ketosis For Hunger Suppression

Most diets aren’t sustainable. Anyone who’s lost weight on a diet initially but gained the weight back afterwards will know this. That’s because most diets leave you feeling hungry and unsatisfied much of the time. This is where the ketogenic diet provides a nice advantage that can make it more effective for weight loss than other eating plans: it helps suppress hunger and appetite. If you’re wondering how to use ketosis for hunger suppression, this article will walk you through how exactly this can be done and why it’s a better method than other diets. Ketosis Vs Traditional Dieting Ketosis is achieved through either intermittent fasting, eating high-fat and very-low-carb, or a combination of both. It’s also importatnt to note that ketosis and intermittent fasting aren’t interchangeable. While the ketogenic diet has a structure to follow, there are some big differences between eating for ketosis and following a traditional diet plan. Let’s start by talking about the traditional practice of calorie counting for weight loss and why it alone is ineffective. Why Calorie Counting is Impractical Short-term weight loss is pretty easy for most people. Any of us can follow a strict diet for a short period of time to shed pounds, but for most dieters that weight gradually comes back over time — and often leaves them weighing more than they did to begin with. The typical calorie-restrictive diet leaves us with hunger pangs and food cravings, not taking nutrition or satiety into account. This is ineffective because: The body doesn’t process all calories the same. Quality matters. Many traditional diet foods, especially packaged foods, are not healthy for us or filling. The focus becomes too much about how many calories you’re eating and not enough about what Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis: Treatment Pitfalls

Starvation Ketoacidosis: Treatment Pitfalls

Dear Editor, Yeow et al.1 describe a case of non-diabetic euglycaemic acidosis resulting from post op dysphagia and poor intake of approximately six weeks duration. We have seen a similar case of ‘starvation ketoacidosis’ in a patient undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tube replacement. We think that intravenous (IV) glucose should be the initial treatment, with the addition of insulin only if required. The correspondence from Frise and Mackillop2 states this strategy is effective for treating ketoacidosis in pregnancy; however, there are also some other pitfalls in treatment of starvation ketoacidosis which must be considered, and some overlap with alcoholic ketoacidosis. Unlike patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, patients with starvation ketosis release insulin when carbohydrate is administered. They are also producing high levels of glucose elevating hormones such as glucagon and have depleted glycogen stores. These hormones cause the lipolysis which helps generate ketones for fuel. The addition of exogenous insulin in this state risks hypoglycaemia. Once provided with adequate carbohydrate the insulin levels will rise and counter-regulatory hormone levels will fall, resolving the ketosis. Alcoholics are another group prone to ketosis (alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA)) and are particularly prone to hypoglycaemia; administration of insulin to those patients would have to be with caution and literature3 on AKA reports resolution without insulin administration, although there is little evidence outside of case reports. Starved patients and alcoholics are also both at risk of thiamine deficiency. Depletion of body thiamine stores can occur within four weeks. It is important to consider this, as administration of IV glucose in thiamine deficiency can Continue reading >>

How Do I Break The Starvation Mode And Maintain Ketosis?

How Do I Break The Starvation Mode And Maintain Ketosis?

How do I break the starvation mode and maintain ketosis? How do I break the starvation mode and maintain ketosis? I am a frequent reader of BB.com and have been in the background more or less since the end of 2005. Without a lot of background I am fairly certain my body has dropped my metabolism in response to years of low calorie PSMF'ing with calorie intake on average <1200 a day. After resolving some personal issues I seem to dropping some weight although fairly slow and not even close to my past experience of 2.5 lbs per week over 8 months. I understand after research here that I need to up the calories, weight train and bulk and cut separately. I was 268 around Oct 05 and 249 now and 66". Most of the progress has been in the last two months. But back to my question, if I increase the protein and fat calories will that break the cycle while maintaining ketosis? Will weight training break the cycle, maintain muscle mass and stay in ketosis? Will bike rides three days a week break the cycle? What I am asking is will the body shut down with a low calorie intake regardless of the work performed? I have to stay off carbs, they seemed to be utilized at a rate of 1 lb gained for every 1 lb consumed. I am eating some green veggies, salad, cauliflower and broc**** so I am not competely carb free. This is very frustrating because keto dieting has really never failed to show results until the last 12-18 months. - 2 scrambled eggs and 2 slices of bacon (breakfast) - Cappuccino, dry but with some milk and Spenda - 7 ounces of canned salmon with 1 oz mayo (lunch) - 2 breasts and a thigh from KFC with the skin and batter removed (dinner) I guess it is possible that I am not in starvation mode but just taking in to many calories with to little activity resulting in slow weightloss Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis, And Is It Healthy?

What Is Ketosis, And Is It Healthy?

Ketosis is a natural metabolic state. It involves the body producing ketone bodies out of fat, and using them for energy instead of carbs. You can get into ketosis by following a very low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet (1). In addition to fast weight loss, ketosis may have several health benefits, such as reduced seizures in epileptic children (2). Ketosis is quite complex, but this article explains what it is and how it can benefit you. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which fat provides most of the fuel for the body. It occurs when there is limited access to glucose (blood sugar), which is the preferred fuel source for many cells in the body. Ketosis is most often associated with ketogenic and very low-carb diets. It also happens during pregnancy, infancy, fasting and starvation (3, 4, 5, 6). To go into ketosis, people generally need to eat fewer than 50 grams of carbs per day and sometimes as little as 20 grams per day. This requires removing certain food items from your diet, such as grains, candy and sugary soft drinks. You also have to cut back on legumes, potatoes and fruit. When eating a very low-carb diet, levels of the hormone insulin go down and fatty acids are released from body fat stores in large amounts. Many of these fatty acids are transferred to the liver, where they are oxidized and turned into ketones (or ketone bodies). These molecules can provide energy for the body. Unlike fatty acids, ketones can cross the blood-brain barrier and provide energy for the brain in the absence of glucose. Ketosis is a metabolic state where ketones become the main sources of energy for the body and brain. This happens when carb intake and insulin levels are very low. It's a common misunderstanding that the brain doesn't function without dietary carbs. It's true that glu Continue reading >>

Enter Starvation Mode - 8 Ways Being On Ketogenic Diet Can Harm You | The Times Of India

Enter Starvation Mode - 8 Ways Being On Ketogenic Diet Can Harm You | The Times Of India

8 ways being on ketogenic diet can harm you Even though you begin with a feeling of being satiated due to high-fat and protein levels, the body gradually starts asking for glucose to produce energy. This glucose can only come from carbohydrates. And ultimately, our body starts asking for carbohydrates and lands into starvation mode. We have sent you a verification email. To verify, just follow the link in the message 8 ways being on ketogenic diet can harm you 1/9How being on ketogenic diet can harm you Low-carb, high-fat Ketogenic diet has been in news for quite some time now. Not only are some celebrity trainers endorsing the diet, there are many pages on social media guiding people the keto way! There are many impressive weight loss stories of people on Keto but mind you, it's not all hunky dory. This diet comes with its set of challenges. Here's what you must know. Is keto worth the effort of playing with our body? According to experts and industry insiders, no. Here's why: Continue reading >>

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

Hunger

Hunger

Because this has to be said, my shower-thought of the day: I see a lot of people complaining about “hunger” when dieting – “I’m doing a ketogenic diet… why am I hungry? – I read I should not feel hunger on a ketogenic diet”… Well, let me tell you: Hunger is not necessarily a bad thing. Guys & Gals: have we become so “cognitive dissonant” and complacent, that we have forgotten that hunger is, in a way, a natural part of the process of any diet that the main focus is fat loss??? Any diet, be it keto or high carb, will eventually make you feel hungry. Yes, there are “ways” to trick your body and get “distracted” from the hunger signals, but being hungry is NORMAL, NATURAL and most of all, EXPECTED. There is nothing wrong with you if you experience hunger on keto…. and if you are eating as per the Ketogains macros (from our Ketogains MACRO calculator) – you are likely going to do well. “Eating more fat” just because you are “hungry” (and because someone told you you should be eating more fat) – UTTERLY defeats the purpose of a fat loss diet (and of course, #context dependent)…. because to lose body fat, you DO require an energy deficit. What can you do if you are hungry then? 1. Correct Macros. Check your macros are correctly calculated using OUR calculator. 2. Whole Food. Put an emphasis on WHOLE, nutrient dense foods, especially PROTEIN. Shakes are ok, for example, as a way to reach macros… but if you find yourself constantly hungry, you are better off eating chicken breast / beef, etc vs liquid calories. 3. Green Vegetables. Really: do you actually know you can eat almost a kilo of spinach a day, without disrupting keto? Go and look at the NET Carbs: 4. Soups. Try to increase food volume with liquids. My personal recipe for Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

GENERAL ketoacidosis is a high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to an excessive blood concentration of ketone bodies (keto-anions). ketone bodies (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released into the blood from the liver when hepatic lipid metabolism has changed to a state of increased ketogenesis. a relative or absolute insulin deficiency is present in all cases. CAUSES The three major types of ketosis are: (i) Starvation ketosis (ii) Alcoholic ketoacidosis (iii) Diabetic ketoacidosis STARVATION KETOSIS when hepatic glycogen stores are exhausted (eg after 12-24 hours of total fasting), the liver produces ketones to provide an energy substrate for peripheral tissues. ketoacidosis can appear after an overnight fast but it typically requires 3 to 14 days of starvation to reach maximal severity. typical keto-anion levels are only 1 to 2 mmol/l and this will usually not alter the anion gap. the acidosis even with quite prolonged fasting is only ever of mild to moderate severity with keto-anion levels up to a maximum of 3 to 5 mmol/l and plasma pH down to 7.3. ketone bodies also stimulate some insulin release from the islets. patients are usually not diabetic. ALCOHOLIC KETOSIS Presentation a chronic alcoholic who has a binge, then stops drinking and has little or no oral food intake for a few days (ethanol and fasting) volume depletion is common and this can result in increased levels of counter regulatory hormones (eg glucagon) levels of free fatty acids (FFA) can be high (eg up to 3.5mM) providing plenty of substrate for the altered hepatic lipid metabolism to produce plenty of ketoanions GI symptoms are common (eg nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, haematemesis, melaena) acidaemia may be severe (eg pH down to 7.0) plasma glucose may be depressed or normal or Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Ketosis Explained – For Weight Loss, Health Or Performance

Ketosis Explained – For Weight Loss, Health Or Performance

Get Started Ketosis is a natural state for the body, when it is almost completely fueled by fat. This is normal during fasting, or when on a strict low-carb diet. Ketosis has many potential benefits, but there are also side effects. In type 1 diabetes and certain other rare situations excessive ketosis can even become dangerous. On this page you can learn all about how to harness the benefits of ketosis, while avoiding any problems. It all starts with understanding what ketosis is. Choose a section, or keep reading below for all of them. Ketosis ExplainedKetosis Explained BenefitsBenefits How to Get Into KetosisHow to Get Into Ketosis Ketosis ExplainedSymptoms & How to Know You’re In Ketosis Side Effects, Fears & Potential DangersSide Effects, Fears & Potential Dangers How to Reach Optimal KetosisHow to Reach Optimal Ketosis ketones Ketosis Explained The “keto” in the word ketosis comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”.1 This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then consumed as fuel in the body, including by the brain. This is important as the brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day,2 and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose… or ketones. Maximizing fat burning On a ketogenic diet your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low and fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is o Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Starvation Mode Myth

Starvation Mode Myth

STARVATION MODE If you are a sugar burner, your muscles rely on glucose for fuel. So if you deprive your body of glucose through fasting or caloric deficit, your body will run out of glucose at some point as it can only store about 2000 calories or so of glucose in your muscles and liver. The body then starts to cannibalize protein to make more sugar to fuel the body. This is what is referred to as “starvation mode”. But, if you are on a well formulated ketogenic diet, you are no longer burning glucose for fuel. You are burning Ketones! WHY INTERMITTENT FASTING WORKS WITH KETO! A ketogenic diet spares protein from being oxidized, which preserves muscle. This is why you do not go into “starvation mode.” Branched-chain amino acids are considered essential because your body can’t make them, so you need to consume them for proper muscle building and repair (as well replenishing red blood cells). What I found so interesting is that BCAA oxidation rates usually rise with exercise, which means you need more if you are an athlete. But in keto-adapted athletes, ketones are burned in place of BCAA. Your muscles will actual go though a change where they reject insulin (and as a result glucose) because they PREFER to burn ketones over glucose. So your muscle energy comes from ketones, not glucose. This can actually cause some people fasting blood sugar levels to temporarily rise when becoming keto adapted (called phsysiological insulin resistance). As your muscles reject glucose your blood levels rise since you muscles are no longer using it for fuel. Critics of low-carb diets claim that you need insulin to grow muscles; however, in a well-designed low-carb, high-fat diet there is less protein oxidation and double the amount of fat oxidation, which leaves your muscles in Continue reading >>

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