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What Is Ketosis Breath Like?

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Source Ketosis is the name for a state achieved on a low-carbohydrate diet. According to WebMD, when you are in ketosis, it means your body is burning fat for energy. When that happens, your body releases ketones into your bloodstream, and you are in ketosis. This state may cause a host of temporary symptoms. Understanding the Symptoms Many dieters develop symptoms that let them know ketones are present. For many people beginning a low-carb diet, ketosis kicks in after a few days of strict adherence to the diet. In fact, many low-carbohydrate plans, such as Atkins and paleo, have an initial phase in which dieters take in extremely low amounts of carbohydrates (usually less than 25 grams per day) to kick start ketosis. You can test for ketones in the urine using ketosis strips, or rely on symptoms to tell you ketosis has been achieved. Early Stages Symptoms of ketosis vary, depending how long you've been in the state. In the early stages, the symptoms may be a bit unpleasant. However, as your body adapts to ketones in the bloodstream, symptoms may decrease. Early symptoms usually last for several days or up to a week in some people. This period of symptoms is sometimes called the keto flu. It may continue until your body is used to burning fat instead of glucose. Afterwards, the levels of ketones should lessen, but that doesn't mean you aren't losing weight. It means your body has found a balance and is no longer producing excess ketones. According to Diet Doctor, early stage symptoms include: Flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache Nausea Brain fog Constipation Leg cramps Feeling unusually thirsty Irritability Heart palpitations Dry mouth Ketosis breath, which smells fruity and unpleasant Decreased energy and weakness Dizziness Sleep problems Cold hands and feet Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Beat Bad Breath

8 Ways To Beat Bad Breath

Stay On Top Of Your Teeth Your first and easiest line of defense is good oral care. Cavities, tooth decay, and gum disease can all be underlying causes of odor, says Sally Cram, DDS, a Washington DC based periodontist and a consumer advocate for the American Dental Association. Brush twice a day and floss at least once daily to remove the plaque and bacteria that accumulates on your teeth and under your gumline. And be sure to visit your dentist twice a year for a checkup and professional cleaning. Clean Your Tongue The fleshy surface of the tongue is a prime breeding ground for harmful bacteria and accounts for a large percentage of halitosis cases; but most people neglect this crucial area when brushing. To dislodge the offending build-up take a regular soft bristle toothbrush and make a few gentle strokes down the tongue from back to front once a day, says Cram. Depending on the anatomy of your tongue—some people have a lot of grooves -you might want to invest in a tongue scraper for more effective cleaning. Check with your dentist for the best option based on your needs. Go Sugar-Free Reaching for mints and gum can help mask that dragon breath but if you’re using sugary brands you’re actually adding to the problem. Bacteria in your mouth tend to ferment sugar, which leads to those very unpleasant odors, says Cram. So stick with sugar-free solutions. And while you’re at it, cutting down on sugar in the rest of your diet can go a long way in snuffing out those icky smells. Wet Your Whistle Your saliva contains vital protective enzymes that help kill bad bacteria, so a dry mouth can be contributing to your smelly situation. Staying hydrated will help stimulate the salivary glands and keep your mouth properly moisturized. If you’re guzzling the optimal 8 glass Continue reading >>

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Abstract Background: Ketogenic diets are used therapeutically to treat intractable seizures. Clinically, it appears that the maintenance of ketosis is crucial to the efficacy of the diet in ameliorating seizures. To understand how ketosis and seizure protection are related, a reliable, noninvasive measure of ketosis that can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort is needed. Objective: The objective was to determine which index, breath acetone or urinary acetoacetate, is more strongly related to the plasma ketones acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate. Design: After fasting overnight for 12 h, 12 healthy adults consumed 4 ketogenic meals over 12 h. Blood, breath, and urine samples were collected hourly. Blood was analyzed for plasma acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, breath for acetone, and urine for acetoacetate. Results: By the end of the 12-h dietary treatment, plasma acetoacetate, plasma β-hydroxybutyrate, and breath acetone had increased 3.5-fold, whereas urinary acetoacetate increased 13-fold when measured enzymatically and 25-fold when measured with urinary ketone dipsticks. Plasma acetoacetate was best predicted by breath acetone (R2 = 0.70, P < 0.0001). Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate was equally predicted by breath acetone and urinary acetoacetate (R2 = 0.54, P = 0.0040). Conclusions: Breath acetone is as good a predictor of ketosis as is urinary acetoacetate. Breath acetone analysis is noninvasive and can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort to patients. As an indicator of ketosis in epilepsy patients consuming a ketogenic diet, breath acetone may be useful for understanding the mechanism of the diet, elucidating the importance of ketosis in seizure protection, and ultimately, enhancing the efficacy of the diet by improving patient monitoring. I Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: How To Stop Bad Keto Breath

Ketosis Breath: How To Stop Bad Keto Breath

Keto breath is a common complaint new people on the keto diet have. I want to address what keto breath is, why a keto diet causes bad breath, and lastly, how to stop bad breath on a ketogenic diet. What Causes Keto Breath? I have to tell you about how ketosis works in order for you to understand why you get keto breath in the first place. Ketosis happens when your body has burned off all the excess stored temporary energy in your body and is now utilizing fat in your body or the fat you eat as energy. You’ll be in a state of burning carbs and burning fat at the same time, which is 100% normal. When you restrict carbs dramatically, like on a ketogenic diet, your body is forced to turn to fat for fuel. As you burn more and more fat, your body will create ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are a by product of fat metabolization. In other words, anytime you burn fat, wether its from the fats you ate or the fat that exists in your body, your body is creating ketones. There are 3 main ketone bodies, but I don’t think it’s important to get into them in this article. Acetone is one of them and that’s what is likely causing your breath to smell bad. This is important: The ketone bodies that are generated from burning fat is “energy” your body can use (instead of using glucose). In fact, your brain prefers ketones over glucose to function! HOWEVER, when you are in the state of becoming keto adapted, that is, your body is NOT fully able to burn fat for fuel, you will have excess ketone bodies in your body. Excess ketone bodies is BAD for your health. Either your body utilized them for energy or it needs to get rid of them. Your body gets rid of excess ketone bodies through your urine and your breath. And that’s how KETO BREATH happens. It’s when your body has excess keto Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb diets may be good for your waistline, but you might not be able to say the same for your breath. Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic! Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet. "Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. Pass the Bread? This is not an oral hygiene problem, Burrell says, so "all the brushing, flossing, and scraping of the tongue that you can do is not possibly enough to overcome this." The bottom line is that you must "reconsider the diet and modify it so this doesn't happen," he says. Sure, "there may be some ways to mask it by using mouthwashes, but you can't overcome the fundamental problem other than by changing the diet -- or at least introducing some carbohydrates." "It's a difficult problem to solve because if one uses any sucking candy or lozenge, one has to be careful that it has no sugar in it" as sugar is a big no-no on many low-carb eating plans, says S. Lawrence Simon, DDS, a New York City periodon Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

High Protein Diets And Bad Breath

High Protein Diets And Bad Breath

BULLETINS • Overview • Issues HEALTH A-Z HOT TOPICS NEWSLETTERS High Protein Diets and Bad Breath The Better Life Experts | July 15, 2009 An embarrassing side effect of low carbohydrate diet programs is halitosis (bad breath), commonly experienced within a few days of increasing protein consumption, a frequent companion to the low carb diet. Ketones (smelly chemicals) are produced as the body burns fat and exits through breath, urine and perspiration. A malodorous breath is the curse of dieters (just ask the co-workers, friends, family and just about any other person who comes into close contact with people who consume low carb-high protein foods). Ironically, it is one of the signals that a high protein diet is working, much to the dismay of many people who are on the breath receiving end of conversations with such a dieter. The problem with low carb, high protein diets is that there is an insufficient amount of carbohydrate available for the body to burn off to supply its energy needs. When carbohydrate intake is too low, the liver converts fat molecules into fatty acids and ketone bodies, an alternative to glucose as a source of energy. When excess ketones (acetones) are produced, it can create an unhealthy state we call ketosis. Ketosis can lead to many health problems and is actually dangerous in extreme cases. Since most high protein diets limit the amount of carbohydrates you are allowed to eat, your body has no choice but to break down fat and other tissues, releasing ketones into your system. “Keto breath” is sometimes noticeable on people who are on very low calorie diets or on people with poorly controlled diabetes. Some people describe the odor as smelling like a combination of nail polish and rotten pineapple. Another source of bad breath is the bac Continue reading >>

What Is Acetone?

What Is Acetone?

You can find it in paint thinners, nail polish, and the manufacturing of plastics. But it’s also found naturally (and safely) in the human body, especially in those following a ketogenic diet. What we’re talking about here is acetone, a ketone body produced in the ketosis process, which has many benefits in the body. But what is acetone, exactly? What role does it play in ketosis? Those are questions we’ll be diving into below so you can better understand how this molecule fits into your ketogenic diet and why it’s important. What is Acetone? Acetone is a type of ketone. When someone is eating a high-fat and low-carb diet (namely, the ketogenic diet) or goes through prolonged fasting and there isn’t enough glucose in the body for fuel, the liver starts breaking down fatty acids for energy for the body and the brain. This is the process known as ketosis, the primary function and goal of the ketogenic diet. When ketosis happens, water-soluble molecules called ketone bodies, or just simply “ketones,” are released. These three ketones are: Acetoacetate Beta-hydroxybutyrate Acetone Acetoacetate is created first, followed by beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone. Acetone is created spontaneously from the breakdown of acetoacetate and is the simplest and most volatile ketone. It diffuses into the lungs and exits the body from exhaled breath. Acetone Benefits on the Ketogenic Diet One way that those on a keto diet ensure they maintain their ketosis, and receive the benefits of ketosis, is by measuring the amount of acetone on the breath. Typically, the higher amount of acetone present, the further they are into ketosis. Weight Loss Benefits There are many reasons someone might choose to follow a keto diet and put their body in ketosis. Benefits of being in ketosis incl Continue reading >>

855 (eat-rite)

855 (eat-rite)

Congratulations, you have foul-smelling breath after bariatric surgery! Though this may seem like a trick, having rotten breath after bariatric surgery usually means you are losing excessive weight rapidly. This is a good thing. Many people often report their mouths feel dry or sticky right after surgery, regardless of what they do. This is caused by ketosis which is a metabolic process your body will undergo after surgery. Radically changing your diet post operatively is the main culprit for this side effect. It’s no secret that you cannot survive without food. Food helps you to fuel your body so it can carry out necessary functions. Your body’s main fuel source is from glucose. Glucose can commonly be found in your starches, such as pasta and bread. Your body will break down these starches into simple sugars and either store them in your liver or use them to fuel your body. When you drastically reduce glucose, your body must find energy elsewhere. Ketosis is a condition where fat stores break down to give you energy since it can no longer rely on your high carbohydrate diet. Rapid weight loss is the hope for most bariatric patients. However, it doesn’t come without a price. Every patient is put on a very restrictive diet for the first two months. The first few days after surgery the only thing patients are able to drink are clear, hydrating fluids. Due to this, the body is forced to burn off fat for energy instead of burning off carbohydrates. This process is called ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic process where stored fat is broken down for energy resulting in higher levels of ketones. These higher levels of ketones include breath acetone which is responsible for that sweeter odor of the breath. This smell is increased in ketotic individuals. As stated in the Am Continue reading >>

How To Beat Ketosis Bad Breath

How To Beat Ketosis Bad Breath

The ketogenic diet is a diet loved by many and that’s because it is a diet that really delivers noticeable results. And noticeable results normally mean that those who are most successful in losing weight are most likely going to spread the word to as many friends as possible. What can possibly go wrong here? Well, some might be put off with the all the habit changes required while others who decide to take the plunge might find themselves in a bind with some of the negative symptoms you can expect throughout the journey. The symptoms are normally associated with most low-carb diets. This includes insomnia, diarrhea and short-term fatigue. With some determination, it is possible to overcome those. However, there is another symptom that could serve as an annoying thorn even as you approach ketosis and that’s bad breath. So if you ever find yourself with unusually bad breath while you are working so hard in changing your eating habits, don’t panic! It’s completely normal! What you need to focus on right now is getting rid of that. The key is knowing exactly what causes bad breath so you will fully understand why the solutions found in this guide are guaranteed to help to some degree. Try to join the various online groups that promote ketogenic diets and other forms of low-carb diets including Atkins, South Beach and even Paleo diets. Ask if bad breath is a common thing and you are sure to get some replies acknowledging it. There was this one survey conducted by some scientists claiming that 40 percent of the people on these diets report bad breath. You will notice that not everyone experiences this problem just like how not everyone experiences keto flu although bad breath is a little bit more complicated since there are natural causes to bad breath in addition to Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Dr Karl's Q&a Forum

Dr Karl's Q&a Forum

Zac goes to the gym a few times a week and when he does chin ups he holds his breath on the last couple. After he completes one of these chin ups he breathes out and his breath stinks like he's been drinking all night. It only seems to work on these short bursts of intense exercise. Is this lactic acid? The mention of ketones and lactic acid in discussion of this question reminded me of the term 'ketoacidosis' from my days studying Agricultural Chemistry at Sydney Uni. From memory it happens in periods of low oxygen and may provide an answer here, but i can't find this in my old notes. All I've found is that alpha-ketoglutarate is part of the tricarboxylic acid (or citric acid or Kreb's) cycle, although this may have nothing to do with it. You may be able to get some information from the Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science at Sydney University, possibly through Dr Edith Lees, who can be found through the phonebook at the university website. Cheers. Terry : , URL : 16:59:00 18 Sep, 2003 EST I was itching to reply when this was being discussed but unfortunately unable to get to a computer or phone, but I can now. Zac's acetic breath is caused by part of a process called Ketosis which happens when your body is attempting to burn fat. Now I'll turn over to Rosemary Stanton ... "In ketosis, fats are incompletely burned and acetoacetic acid is produced. This is then broken down to ketones such as acetone. When acetone is being produced, it is excreted through the lungs (you can smell it on the breath) and in urine. Ketosis is often accompanied by a feeling of nausea, light-headedness, weakness, headache, and, sometimes vomiting." Food for Health 1990. Zac also said that he only smells it after he releases his breath after holding it for his last few repetiti Continue reading >>

How Low-carb / High-protein Diets Can

How Low-carb / High-protein Diets Can "trick" A California Dui Breath Test

Some medical and physiological conditions can cause California DUI breath tests to produce falsely high results. Such conditions include: hypoglycemia, fasting, and high-protein / low-carbohydrate diets (such as the Atkins and Paleo diets). These conditions involve insufficient carbohydrate intake for energy, or -- in the case of diabetes -- insufficient insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. The result in both cases is the body's production of "ketones.” Ketones are similar in chemical composition to isopropyl alcohol, the type of alcohol found in solvents such as acetone.1 They are different from ethyl alcohol, the type of alcohol in an alcoholic beverage. Many DUI breath testing devices cannot reliably distinguish ketones from ethyl alcohol. Worse, “ketosis” can produce visible signs that mimic alcohol impairment, including: dehydration and excessive thirst, sluggishness, flushed face, decreased coordination, and even As a result, people with hypoglycemia… or who follow a low carbohydrate diet… are often falsely accused of: To help you better understand how these conditions can lead to a falsely high DUI breath test, our California DUI defense attorneys discuss the following, below: 1. What are ketones? Normally, our bodies get energy from carbohydrates in our diet. When we eat foods containing carbohydrates, our digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar. One of these sugar molecules is glucose, the main energy source for our bodies. Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream after eating. We often refer to this as “blood sugar.”3 When we don't eat enough carbohydrates to produce the blood sugar we need, our bodies have to burn our fat stores instead.4 Fats are broken down in the liver. There, they are turned into ketones and ketoa Continue reading >>

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