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What Is Ketosis Breath Like?

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

What is ketosis? Being in ketosis is truly a magical thing. Ketosis happens when your body starts producing ketone bodies instead of utilizing carbohydrates as energy. Both can be used as energy sources, but I find that converting to a fat-burner over a carbohydrate-burner to be most favorable. Signs of being in ketosis There are a few signs that could suggest you’re in ketosis: a metallic taste in mouth strong smelling urine random bursts of happiness (it’s weird, but it’s true!) decreased appetite How to get into ketosis The best way to get into ketosis is to immediately drop all major carb sources in your diet and focus on high-quality fats. Some find that going extremely low carb for a couple days will jumpstart ketone production and ultimately reaching a state of ketosis. Initially when you first remove a majority of carbohydrates from your diet, most people experience signs of lethargy and flu-like symptoms. This is what people consider the “low carb flu.” The low carb flu could last anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks. It’s important to stay extremely hydrated on a ketogenic diet, so much make sure you’re getting enough water and electrolytes. If you’re one of the lucky ones, you won’t experience any low carb flu symptoms at all. Carbohydrate tolerance varies from person to person to maintain a ketogenic state. Some report that they can eat up to 80 grams and still be in ketosis. A safe spot for most people seems to be between 20-30 grams. Benefits of being in ketosis You will find it hard to believe that an array of benefits can be obtained from following a ketogenic diet, but the proof is in the research! Some of these include: Effortless weight loss Awesome blood sugar regulation Reduced blood pressure Reduced inflammation Appetite Continue reading >>

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The keto (low carb, LCHF or whatever you want to call it) diet isn’t all bacon, weight loss and happiness. One of the side effects of being in ketosis can be bad breath, also known as keto breath. Sometimes you get it when you’re starting out with a ketogenic diet and have the keto flu. I’ve learned how to keep keto breath under control so it doesn’t bother me much these days. But when I get dehydrated I start getting that metallic taste in my mouth and know it’s probably keto breath. Luckily I know how to fix it now! Who gets it? Since I’ve been on my keto journey, I’ve encountered 3 types of people: People who don’t get keto breath at all – I don’t know why they’re so lucky. Ketosis just doesn’t seem to affect their breath at all. I have no idea why their bodies react differently. People who sometimes get keto breath – Some people don’t feel the keto breath for days and then suddenly it hits them. It can also be worse around the same time each day. If I had to guess, I’d say it’s when they’re starting to get hungry. People who constantly have keto breath – They have it 24/7, some of them can get rid of it temporarily with tricks (I´ll list some below) but some are unfortunately just beyond that. Honestly, I’m not a medical professional and I can’t explain why everyone’s different when it comes to keto breath. You can have two people who eat the exact same low carb food, one of them gets it and the other one doesn’t. Maybe it has something to do with the individuals metabolism. I’d love to hear from anyone who can explain this to me. What is keto breath like? Most people describe it as a fruity, acetone like smell. It can be quite strong. Some people who suffer from it say that they can feel it and almost taste it, like a Continue reading >>

High Protein Diets And Bad Breath

High Protein Diets And Bad Breath

BULLETINS • Overview • Issues HEALTH A-Z HOT TOPICS NEWSLETTERS High Protein Diets and Bad Breath The Better Life Experts | July 15, 2009 An embarrassing side effect of low carbohydrate diet programs is halitosis (bad breath), commonly experienced within a few days of increasing protein consumption, a frequent companion to the low carb diet. Ketones (smelly chemicals) are produced as the body burns fat and exits through breath, urine and perspiration. A malodorous breath is the curse of dieters (just ask the co-workers, friends, family and just about any other person who comes into close contact with people who consume low carb-high protein foods). Ironically, it is one of the signals that a high protein diet is working, much to the dismay of many people who are on the breath receiving end of conversations with such a dieter. The problem with low carb, high protein diets is that there is an insufficient amount of carbohydrate available for the body to burn off to supply its energy needs. When carbohydrate intake is too low, the liver converts fat molecules into fatty acids and ketone bodies, an alternative to glucose as a source of energy. When excess ketones (acetones) are produced, it can create an unhealthy state we call ketosis. Ketosis can lead to many health problems and is actually dangerous in extreme cases. Since most high protein diets limit the amount of carbohydrates you are allowed to eat, your body has no choice but to break down fat and other tissues, releasing ketones into your system. “Keto breath” is sometimes noticeable on people who are on very low calorie diets or on people with poorly controlled diabetes. Some people describe the odor as smelling like a combination of nail polish and rotten pineapple. Another source of bad breath is the bac Continue reading >>

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

A recent article in the International Journal of Obesity should give low-carbers cause for a little alarm. Here is what happened to a man in Sweden on a low-carb diet: We report a case of a 59-year-old man, body mass index 26.6 kg/m2, who began a weight reduction program, partly because of knee pains but also because he was a glider pilot where weight is important. He used a Swedish textbook on obesity treatment written by S Rössner together with the commonly used Swedish VLCD [very low calorie diet] Nutrilett (Cederroths, Stockholm, Sweden), 5 packets/day for 3 weeks, which is an approved standard regimen. This treatment resulted in a weight loss of 7 kg. During dieting, the man discovered that an alcohol ignition interlock device, installed in an official company car, indicated that he had consumed alcohol and the vehicle failed to start. This was confusing because the man was a life-long teetotaller and was therefore both surprised and upset by the result. As he had been supervising private aviation he had access to a second breath-alcohol analyzer, which indicated a simultaneous BAC ranging from 0.01 to 0.02 g/100 ml. A VLCD diet (very-low-calorie diet, a protein-sparing modified fast) contains mainly protein along with a small amount of carbohydrate and very few calories, usually fewer than 1000 per day. Just about anyone going on one of these diets will soon be in producing ketone bodies at a pretty high rate. But the same goes for a more traditional low-carb diet as well. If carbs are kept at a low level, ketosis will occur. In fact, it’s desired. Ketone bodies are water-soluble products of fat metabolism. The body has three ways of dealing with ketones: it can burn them for energy (which it does with great success), it can release them in the urine (which is Continue reading >>

Get Rid Of Keto Breath

Get Rid Of Keto Breath

How to Get Rid of Bad Breath Caused by Ketogenic Diets Did you know that there is a connection between certain diets and bad breath? And no, this isn't just referring to eating lots of onions and garic! Low carbohydrate/high protein or high fat diets, such as the Keto, Paleo, South Beach, and Atkins diet, can actually cause bad breath. This foul smelling breath problem is referred to as "Keto Breath" in many communities. Diets that put the body in ketosis, while excellent for losing weight, may leave your mouth with an offensive taste and odor. Why do Ketogenic Diets cause this "Dragon Breath"? There are two main reasons that a low-carb/high-protein diet causes bad breath: 1. Volatile Sulfur Compounds (Sulfur gases): There are billions of bacteria living in your mouth at any given moment. These bacteria consume protein from the foods you eat and produce sulfur gas, or bad breath as a waste product. By eating high protein content and fewer carbs, your are introducing more protein for bacteria to eat and this allows them to produce additional bad breath. 2. Ketosis The main goal of ketogenic diets is to minimize the consumption of carbohydrates by replacing them with healthy fats and proteins. This method is commonly used in order to achieve timely weight loss. Typically, the body uses glucose from carbohydrates as a source of energy. However, on very low carb diets, the body is instead forced to burn fat for energy. This burning of fat is known as ketosis and produces ketones that are expelled from the body through urine or exhalation. In excessive amounts these ketones can produce a foul smell and create ketosis breath, or keto breath. How do I stop it? Luckily, there are multiple measures you can take to help prevent keto breath while on low-carb/high-fat and high-prot Continue reading >>

What To Do About Keto Breath From A Low-carb Diet

What To Do About Keto Breath From A Low-carb Diet

Fasting, paleo, and low-carb diets are an important health practice for some people. But a common side effect of the weight loss from a low-carb diet is bad breath (often called keto breath), caused by a process called ketosis. You’re not going to give up on your diet, of course, so what’s the solution? What Causes Keto Breath on a Low-Carb or Paleo Diet First of all, you’re not alone. Most people on some form of low carbohydrate diet tend to have worse breath than those who use other methods of dieting. This is mainly due to the food low-carb dieters are now eating and how those foods are reacting in the body. Low-carb diets work by limiting the amount of carbs entering the body, so your body must then look to stored fat for fuel. When your body burns this stored fat, a certain chemical called ketone is made. Ketone exits the body in two ways: through urine and through your mouth. This “keto breath” is what causes bad breath when you’re eating low-carb or paleo, or fasting. Certain foods are also to blame. High-protein foods produce more sulfur when broken down into particles. These particles tend to stay on your tongue and in your mouth longer, especially while you’re asleep, or if you don’t brush in between meals. Because your mouth doesn’t produce saliva when you’re asleep (and for good reason!), these sulfur compounds build up overnight and can really give your partner a wake-up call in the morning when you roll over for a good-morning kiss! An easy way to combat this (and hack your sleep at the same time): mouth taping. Bad Breath Causes Beyond Diet Certain lifestyle changes we make to lose weight or get healthy can also be the culprit of bad breath. Most common are the below. Skipping meals: Without anything to chew, saliva production slows do Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Gerrards Cross, England (for one year) then Dresher, Pennsylvania, USA: My six year old adopted son has had acetone breath consistently for several weeks. I've tested his urine with the strips for glucose and ketones twice, and they are both negative. He has had this previously only when he was slightly dehydrated from bouts of nausea and vomiting. He is otherwise perfectly healthy and active and has no symptoms of diabetes. We have a dog with diabetes which is why I am familiar with the signs and the breath odor and have the urine strips. Are there other causes of acetone breath in an otherwise normal six year old? In view of the negative strips should I still have his blood glucose tested? Answer: Not everyone can smell acetone, but if you can, the most sensitive vehicle is the breath which may explain why urine testing has been negative. Ketosis in children can occur when the body is unable to get sufficient basal energy needs from the metabolism of carbohydrate and resorts to the breakdown of fat stores with the production of ketones. This can occur because of diabetes, but, as you have noticed, this is most likely to occur when appetite is diminished by intercurrent illness. The same can happen if energy consumption is increased and a child is too busy to eat sufficiently. I think it very unlikely that what you describe has anything to do with diabetes, but if you have a diabetic dog and the means of measuring blood sugars you might test your son after a period of energetic activity to see if it is low because the phenomenon I have described is called ketotic hypoglycemia. Additional comments from Dr. Andrea Scaramuzza: When you have excluded diabetes, as in the case of your son because both urine and blood glucose are in normal range, you can take i Continue reading >>

Acetone Breath And Diabetes

Acetone Breath And Diabetes

My husband is 58 and has type 2 diabetes. Two days ago his breath started to smell very strongly, and he was suddenly very tired and slightly nauseated. He recovered from this, and the smell went away. I've read about acetone breath in diabetics. Do you think that is what he had? What's the cause? — Alice, Connecticut Acetone breath in diabetics is caused by an excess production of acetone. Acetone, hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate are ketones, byproducts of fat metabolism. When the body does not have enough insulin (as is the case in people with diabetes), a hormone that is key in glucose metabolism, it instead uses fatty acids as an alternative source of energy, and ketones are the result of this process. Ketones are also produced during a fasting state or when consuming a ketogenic (high-fat, low-carbohydrate) diet. Ketones can cause nausea, vomiting, and fatigue. But I am concerned that your husband might be experiencing diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a serious and life-threatening condition. I suggest that you check your husband’s sugar level at the time you notice his acetone breath and contact his doctor for further advice. It is also quite likely that his acetone breath might be a result of missing meals. Learn more in the Everyday Health Type 2 Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

What Is Acetone?

What Is Acetone?

You can find it in paint thinners, nail polish, and the manufacturing of plastics. But it’s also found naturally (and safely) in the human body, especially in those following a ketogenic diet. What we’re talking about here is acetone, a ketone body produced in the ketosis process, which has many benefits in the body. But what is acetone, exactly? What role does it play in ketosis? Those are questions we’ll be diving into below so you can better understand how this molecule fits into your ketogenic diet and why it’s important. What is Acetone? Acetone is a type of ketone. When someone is eating a high-fat and low-carb diet (namely, the ketogenic diet) or goes through prolonged fasting and there isn’t enough glucose in the body for fuel, the liver starts breaking down fatty acids for energy for the body and the brain. This is the process known as ketosis, the primary function and goal of the ketogenic diet. When ketosis happens, water-soluble molecules called ketone bodies, or just simply “ketones,” are released. These three ketones are: Acetoacetate Beta-hydroxybutyrate Acetone Acetoacetate is created first, followed by beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone. Acetone is created spontaneously from the breakdown of acetoacetate and is the simplest and most volatile ketone. It diffuses into the lungs and exits the body from exhaled breath. Acetone Benefits on the Ketogenic Diet One way that those on a keto diet ensure they maintain their ketosis, and receive the benefits of ketosis, is by measuring the amount of acetone on the breath. Typically, the higher amount of acetone present, the further they are into ketosis. Weight Loss Benefits There are many reasons someone might choose to follow a keto diet and put their body in ketosis. Benefits of being in ketosis incl Continue reading >>

Measuring Breath Acetone For Monitoring Fat Loss: Review

Measuring Breath Acetone For Monitoring Fat Loss: Review

Go to: Introduction Measurements of endogenous acetone in breath have been made for over 50 years. Early studies examined the effect of caloric intake (fasting and calorie restriction diets), dietary macronutrient composition, and exercise on breath acetone 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. While people with and without obesity participated in these investigations, the focus was on the effects of fasting and diabetes. The breath acetone concentration (BrAce) was understood to be a non‐invasive measure of ketosis. Ketosis describes the elevation of ketone bodies in the blood. A range of ketosis levels exists. Healthy individuals on standard mixed diets (i.e., moderate to high carbohydrate content) have a basal ketosis while individuals with uncontrolled diabetes have extremely elevated ketosis, ketoacidosis. In all cases, ketosis describes the quantity of circulating ketone bodies. Increases in ketosis correspond to increases in ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are produced as a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. When the liver metabolizes circulating free fatty acids, these acids are transformed into acetyl‐CoA, a molecule used in the production of energy. Depending on the glucose level, acetyl‐CoA can be diverted to produce acetoacetate, the first of three ketone bodies. From acetoacetate, two other ketone bodies, β‐hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and acetone, are produced by enzymatic degradation or spontaneous decarboxylation, respectively 6, 7. All three ketone bodies circulate in the bloodstream. Acetone, because of its small size, diffuses into the air spaces of the lung and appears in the exhaled breath. Endogenous acetone production is closely related to fat metabolism through the intermediary acetoacetate. Efforts over the past 20 years have better elucidated the relationshi Continue reading >>

Hungry? Why We Get Bad Breath On An Empty Stomach.

Hungry? Why We Get Bad Breath On An Empty Stomach.

Normally bad breath, or halitosis occurs for several reasons. Usually its due to heavy plague on the tongue (yes, the tongue!), large unfilled cavities, gum disease, poor oral hygiene, digestive problems, short-term illness (cold, flu, etc)…and the list goes on. When one is fasting, or has not eaten for many hours bad breath may also occur. It can be frustrating because there is not much to do about it. But it may be helpful to know WHY it happens. Here are some reasons: 1. When one is hungry and dehydrated, saliva flow decreases and therefore it cannot “wash” away plaque and bacteria well. Saliva has many purposes and two of them are “washing” action to clear bacteria and debris from the tongue and mouth and also as a buffer to keep the mouth from becoming too acidic/basic. This bacteria may be trapped on teeth or tongue and cause a bad smell. 2. Digestive juices in the stomach are still produced but because there is no food, these acidic juices begin to break down, causing a foul smell. 3. Another result of “fasting” is the excessive breakdown of fats from the body. This leads to “ketosis”. When the body is in this state ketones are released. One type; acetone is released through the lungs. It also means bad breath! So the bad breath is mainly due to internal forces, not poor oral hygiene in this case. So unless you are fasting for a reason (like for Ramadan), make sure to at least stay hydrated by having about a cup of water every 1-2 hours. Remember, if halitosis is a consistent problem and you can’t seem to figure out why, you may want to visit your dentist or health professional. Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

This information was originally published here . More than three million Canadians have diabetes, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, end stage renal disease and non-traumatic amputation in Canadian adults. The the first step in managing diabetes and maintaining your health is to learn, and use the knowledge to make good decisions. People can live a healthy lifestyle even with diabetes. People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person’s breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person’s breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person’s breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. How diabetes can affect breath The smell of a person’s breath can indicate different things about their health. Diabetes can affect the way a person’s breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person’s breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person’s breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person’s breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body do Continue reading >>

"paleo Breath" & Other Things You Didn't Know About Oral Health

With our culture's recent emphasis on health and wellness, it seems many of us are searching for the perfect diet, the perfect exercise routine, the best way to foster personal growth in relationships. The list goes on. So what about oral health? As an orthodontist, I'd say we don't give enough attention to this very crucial area of our body's well-being. Sure, we all know we should brush our teeth at least twice a day. Flossing is key, too — and gum health is just as important as dental hygiene. That said, we could all be a little bit more well-versed in the details of oral health. Here are five things you probably didn't know about oral health: 1. Paleo breath is a real thing. The latest most popular dieting craze is undoubtedly the low carb / high protein diet. Think Paleo, Atkins, South Beach and so on. Individuals on these diets may have noticed a number of changes since their dieting began and these changes aren't just limited to weight loss. I'm talking about "bad breath." Bad breath is caused by the excretion of the anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that do not need oxygen to survive) that live within your mouth. Normally, the bacteria present in our mouth are responsible for the breakdown of proteins found in our diet, saliva, mucous and phlegm. These anaerobic bacteria excrete sulfur compounds which are responsible for bad breath. The rotten egg smell (hydrogen sulfide) and the barnyard smell (methyl mercaptan) are known as VSCs — Volatile Sulfur Compounds. Due to the increase in higher protein foods for those on a low carb diet, the amount of Volatile Sulfur Compounds common found in the oral cavity increases dramatically and as such the breath of people on these diets gets worse. So to keep your mouth from smelling like a barnyard, drink plenty of water, brus Continue reading >>

How To Detect Ketosis

How To Detect Ketosis

How can you tell if your low-carbing efforts have been effective enough to induce ketosis? Learn how to check your ketones! The state of ketosis The state of ketosis means that the body has switched from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. This means not only dietary fats (olive oil, guacamole, deep-fried pig ears), but also all the jiggly bits around your waist — clearly a desirable state for anyone looking to shed extra weight. When the body metabolizes fat, it generates molecules called ketones (also known as ketone bodies). As you restrict carbohydrate intake and amp up the dietary fat, more fat is metabolized and a greater quantity of ketones are created. Most of the cells in your body — including those in your brain — are able to use ketones for energy, although many people experience a few days’ adjustment period, often called the low carb flu. One of the varieties of ketones generated — acetone — cannot be used by the body and is excreted as waste, mostly in the urine and the breath. Conveniently, this makes it very simple to measure whether or not you are in ketosis. Upon entering ketosis, some people report a distinct change in the smell of their breath as a result of the extra released acetone. It could be “fruity” — it’s been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic.” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you’re in ketosis. The unusual smell isn’t anything dangerous, but it could be annoying. Drinking plenty of water should help, or get yourself some sugar-free gum. Most people report “keto-breath” diminishing after the first few weeks. Detecting ketones in urine The more accurate way — and the one we recommend — to check f Continue reading >>

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