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What Is Ketosis Breath Like?

Do You Smell Like Butt? Ketosis: The Dark Side Of Low Carb Dieting.

Do You Smell Like Butt? Ketosis: The Dark Side Of Low Carb Dieting.

What is Ketosis? In simplest terms, ketosis is the state you are in when your body is burning fat for energy. People on low carbohydrates diets want to be in ketosis; when they’re in Ketosis they know the diet is working. The problem is, being in Ketosis has one serious consequence. Stinky Breath…and I mean S-T-I-N-K-Y. The following is my top ten lists for knowing when you are in ketosis: If your mouth smells like a skunk has built a nest in your mouth using your favorite pair of underwear. You are probably in ketosis. If your kid gets in your car and complains that you have left rotten food under the seat, and you haven’t. You are probably in ketosis. If your co-workers ask you if you farted, and you say “yes” because you’re too embarrassed to tell them it is your breath. You are probably in Ketosis. If you make babies cry. You are probably in Ketosis. If your wise guy partner at work puts up a sign that says, You Stink. You are probably in Ketosis. If your wife tells you she has a headache and all you asked for is a kiss. You are probably in ketosis. If a cop pulls you over and suspects you have been drinking and doesn’t ask to smell your breath. You are probably in ketosis. If your hygienist puts on more than one mask. You are probably in ketosis. If a kid named stinky feet Pete tells you that you smell like ass. You are probably in ketosis. If all your friends refuse to have face-to-face conversations with you, and the only ones you have left are on the Atkins forum. You are probably in ketosis. Ketosis is serious business, to learn more check out this article on About.com at What’s your experience with ketosis? Terry Elkins (whyguy) Continue reading >>

How To Make The Ultimate Party Tablescape With Stuff From A 99 Cent Store

How To Make The Ultimate Party Tablescape With Stuff From A 99 Cent Store

When carb intake drops below 30 grams per day, the body gets rid of organic compounds, known as ketones, through the mouth, a process which can smell pretty gnar to those around you. Nick Rose Jul 19 2016, 10:00pm Photo via Flickr user ImpromptuKitchen So you've managed to start eating well and drop some pounds. You're eating more proteins and fats, and most importantly, dodging evil carbs; your body is going into fat-burning overdrive and you're actually getting results. Yay, you! But you've soon got another problem to deal with: the foul smell emanating from your mouth. According to Dr. Wayne Aldredge, President of the American Academy of Periodontology, cutting down on carbs in order to burn dietary protein and fat can give dieters a serious case of bad breath. Advertisement READ MORE: Our Protein Obsession Is Getting Out of Control Speaking to Thrillist, Aldredge explained how following an Atkins-like ketogenic diet can lead to metabolic state called ketosis. When carb intake drops below 30 grams per day, this process leads to the body getting rid of organic compounds, known as ketones, through the mouth, a smell often described as "rotten fruit, or even metallic." Gross. The reason for this, according to Aldredge, is the delicate balance of bacteria living in our mouths, a balance which is significantly impacted by the sudden absence of carbs. "Foods high in sugar and carbohydrates can create acidic environments in the mouth," Dr. Aldredge told Thrillist. "The bacteria that can lead to periodontal disease thrive in these kinds of environments, feeding off of the sugar that lingers from the food we eat." In other words, a low-sugar diet can actually be good for your oral health because there is less bacteria in the mouth. However, when it comes to smells and ketones Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Measuring Breath Acetone For Monitoring Fat Loss: Review

Measuring Breath Acetone For Monitoring Fat Loss: Review

Go to: Introduction Measurements of endogenous acetone in breath have been made for over 50 years. Early studies examined the effect of caloric intake (fasting and calorie restriction diets), dietary macronutrient composition, and exercise on breath acetone 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. While people with and without obesity participated in these investigations, the focus was on the effects of fasting and diabetes. The breath acetone concentration (BrAce) was understood to be a non‐invasive measure of ketosis. Ketosis describes the elevation of ketone bodies in the blood. A range of ketosis levels exists. Healthy individuals on standard mixed diets (i.e., moderate to high carbohydrate content) have a basal ketosis while individuals with uncontrolled diabetes have extremely elevated ketosis, ketoacidosis. In all cases, ketosis describes the quantity of circulating ketone bodies. Increases in ketosis correspond to increases in ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are produced as a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. When the liver metabolizes circulating free fatty acids, these acids are transformed into acetyl‐CoA, a molecule used in the production of energy. Depending on the glucose level, acetyl‐CoA can be diverted to produce acetoacetate, the first of three ketone bodies. From acetoacetate, two other ketone bodies, β‐hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and acetone, are produced by enzymatic degradation or spontaneous decarboxylation, respectively 6, 7. All three ketone bodies circulate in the bloodstream. Acetone, because of its small size, diffuses into the air spaces of the lung and appears in the exhaled breath. Endogenous acetone production is closely related to fat metabolism through the intermediary acetoacetate. Efforts over the past 20 years have better elucidated the relationshi Continue reading >>

Is Your Low-carb Diet Giving You Ketosis Breath?

Is Your Low-carb Diet Giving You Ketosis Breath?

One of the possible "side-effects" of following a low-carb diet (be it the Atkins Diet, South Beach Diet, or any other low-carb diet plan) is "bad breath", sometimes accompanied by a bad taste in the mouth. This is distressing, of course, but don't think you're condemned to live with it! Causes There are many causes of bad breath, but if the change in your breath happened suddenly after starting a low-carb diet there are two main causes: 1) bad breath due to acetone caused by ketosis, and 2) an excess of protein in the diet producing ammonia in the breath. Bad Breath from Ketosis ("Keto-Breath" or "Ketosis Breath") One of the results of cutting carbohydrates in our bodies is that we start to use more fat for energy. This process generates molecules called "ketones." One type of ketone, called acetone, tends to be excreted both in the urine and the breath. The description of the smell varies, but it is often described as "fruity" or like the smell of apples which are "past their prime" (or even downright rotten). The good news is that keto-breath usually doesn't last forever. Most people find it dies down after a few weeks or at the most a few months. The reason is unclear, but it seems our bodies adapt in some way. Children on a ketogenic diet for epilepsy have been shown to have less acetone in their breath as time goes on, for example. In the meantime, there are things you can do to minimize the impact of "keto-breath": Drink more water: try 8 glasses per day to see if this helps, and then you can experiment from that point. Natural breath fresheners to try include mint, parsley or other greens, cloves, cinnamon, and fennel seeds. Some people swear by breath capsules, which are usually made from parsley oil (e.g. Mint Assure) for keto-breath. Others find they do not h Continue reading >>

Body Odor In Ketosis – What’s Going On?

Body Odor In Ketosis – What’s Going On?

If you are new to ketosis, you may find yourself somewhat puzzled by a couple of odd symptoms that can show up in the first few weeks. In short – the dreaded body odor and bad breath. Now, this can vary from person to person depending on what the state of your health is when you begin the ketogenic diet, and how your body handles the process. If you are coming from a place of quite poor overall health, with years of eating a typical unhealthy diet, plus smoking and drinking, ketosis is going to happen, but there is also going to be a process of detoxing, in which your body begins to clean itself out during ketosis as it gratefully adapts to your new, ‘clean’ way of living and eating. There Are 2 Main Causes of Body Odor When You Are in Ketosis 1. Detoxing This process of detoxing can occur throughout your body, but in particular in your large intestine. A diet that has been high in gluten and refined carbs and low in dietary fibre and fresh, wholesome foods, is likely to have left your large intestine with a fair amount of cleaning out to do. This is the main potential source of the body odour associated with the first phase of going into detox. Also, it is known that the body can often deal with toxins by locking them away in fat deposits. As your body begins to break these down and get rid of them, it also has to get rid of those toxins. The downside of all this is that, if your initial ketosis journey is also one of detox, you may well find yourself with a number of slight personal hygiene issues, like excessive and smelly wind, bad breath, sour sweats and an overall feeling of ickiness. Don’t worry! As anyone who as been through this process will tell you, it is temporary. The major bonus is that you do really feel like you are doing yourself some good whils Continue reading >>

How To Kill Keto Breath

How To Kill Keto Breath

On low carbohydrate diets, it is possible to experience a phenomenon known as “keto breath”. Keto breath specifically refers to an off-putting, fruity smell, and it’s typically caused by one or two aspects of a low carbohydrate diet. Included in this article are a breakdown of what leads to keto breath and an attack plan for how to deal with it. Setting the Scene: Picture it. You’re out on a date with your lovely new Tinder match. She’s an easy three points above her pictures. The whole night is going well. You even stay on your ketogenic diet by going with the pro move; a steak smothered in butter and accompanied by the most amazing asparagus you’ve ever had. You then leave the restaurant. When you go in for a kiss, the girl’s face cringes like its melting. She might even push you away.The culprit? Your breath. Keto breath. Why does it happen? Ketones smell weird! When the body undergoes ketogenesis, it is actively producing ketone bodies for energy usage. Ketosis occurs when the body is an extremely fasted state or in a prolonged carbohydrate fast, and becomes “fat adapted”. This means the metabolic system has switched to burning fats in order to create alternative energy sources known as ketone bodies. For most normal Western dieters, dietary glucose from carbohydrate sources are used to fuel the body. But when dietary glucose is starved (which includes not eating too much protein either), the body can create ketone bodies from body fat or dietary fat to keep everything running smoothly. The body tends to rely on three ketone bodies: acetone, beta hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate.[1] While these ketone bodies are incredible for fueling the body, they come with a dark side effect — a fruity side effect. Ketone bodies have a unique, distinct sweet Continue reading >>

Get Rid Of Keto Breath

Get Rid Of Keto Breath

How to Get Rid of Bad Breath Caused by Ketogenic Diets Did you know that there is a connection between certain diets and bad breath? And no, this isn't just referring to eating lots of onions and garic! Low carbohydrate/high protein or high fat diets, such as the Keto, Paleo, South Beach, and Atkins diet, can actually cause bad breath. This foul smelling breath problem is referred to as "Keto Breath" in many communities. Diets that put the body in ketosis, while excellent for losing weight, may leave your mouth with an offensive taste and odor. Why do Ketogenic Diets cause this "Dragon Breath"? There are two main reasons that a low-carb/high-protein diet causes bad breath: 1. Volatile Sulfur Compounds (Sulfur gases): There are billions of bacteria living in your mouth at any given moment. These bacteria consume protein from the foods you eat and produce sulfur gas, or bad breath as a waste product. By eating high protein content and fewer carbs, your are introducing more protein for bacteria to eat and this allows them to produce additional bad breath. 2. Ketosis The main goal of ketogenic diets is to minimize the consumption of carbohydrates by replacing them with healthy fats and proteins. This method is commonly used in order to achieve timely weight loss. Typically, the body uses glucose from carbohydrates as a source of energy. However, on very low carb diets, the body is instead forced to burn fat for energy. This burning of fat is known as ketosis and produces ketones that are expelled from the body through urine or exhalation. In excessive amounts these ketones can produce a foul smell and create ketosis breath, or keto breath. How do I stop it? Luckily, there are multiple measures you can take to help prevent keto breath while on low-carb/high-fat and high-prot Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Gerrards Cross, England (for one year) then Dresher, Pennsylvania, USA: My six year old adopted son has had acetone breath consistently for several weeks. I've tested his urine with the strips for glucose and ketones twice, and they are both negative. He has had this previously only when he was slightly dehydrated from bouts of nausea and vomiting. He is otherwise perfectly healthy and active and has no symptoms of diabetes. We have a dog with diabetes which is why I am familiar with the signs and the breath odor and have the urine strips. Are there other causes of acetone breath in an otherwise normal six year old? In view of the negative strips should I still have his blood glucose tested? Answer: Not everyone can smell acetone, but if you can, the most sensitive vehicle is the breath which may explain why urine testing has been negative. Ketosis in children can occur when the body is unable to get sufficient basal energy needs from the metabolism of carbohydrate and resorts to the breakdown of fat stores with the production of ketones. This can occur because of diabetes, but, as you have noticed, this is most likely to occur when appetite is diminished by intercurrent illness. The same can happen if energy consumption is increased and a child is too busy to eat sufficiently. I think it very unlikely that what you describe has anything to do with diabetes, but if you have a diabetic dog and the means of measuring blood sugars you might test your son after a period of energetic activity to see if it is low because the phenomenon I have described is called ketotic hypoglycemia. Additional comments from Dr. Andrea Scaramuzza: When you have excluded diabetes, as in the case of your son because both urine and blood glucose are in normal range, you can take i Continue reading >>

Keto Breath: Cause And Remedies

Keto Breath: Cause And Remedies

You’ve been on a ketogenic way of eating for a couple of weeks now, and you’ve stayed under your 20g of carbs every day. Congratulations on your dedication, your reward is… stinky breath? That’s right, most people who try keto at some point in the first month or so of being in ketosis will experience some unpleasant breath. Some people describe it as “metal smell” or having “metallic taste in the mouth”. What a fun reward for choosing a healthful way of eating! The Cause of Keto Breath The explanation is simple, though it’s usually unavoidable, at least until you’re fully fat adapted. As the body shifts into ketosis, it turns fats into ketone bodies, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone. They are all completely normal and healthy to have in the body in the amounts it produces. These ketone bodies, especially acetone, can be detected by smell on the breath. This is actually one of the most reliable ways to tell when you have gotten into ketosis, and can be smelled more easily when you are deeper into this fat burning carbohydrate deprived state. Studies have shown this, and there are devices such as breath ketone test monitor that can measure the amount of acetone in your breath, and tell you the level of ketones that you’re producing (1). The science of this lays in the lungs, and the blood vessels that supply them. Since ketones circulate in the blood, they interact with the small air sacs in the lungs. As these ketones are exposed to the air in your body, they are expelled as a gas, with the distinctive odor of acetone. How Long Does Ketosis Breath Last? Some people never experience this phenomenon, even when they are doing the keto diet correctly and healthfully. Others experience it more as a taste than as an odour. For Continue reading >>

Is Your New Year Diet Giving You Bad Breath?

Is Your New Year Diet Giving You Bad Breath?

JUICE fasts, the 5/2 and the carb-free Atkins diets may be good for dropping the pounds in record time. But an internationally recognised expert on bad breath and halitosis said that crash dieting, fasting, and low-carb diets can also have nasty side-effects. The most common causes for bad breath with dieting is due to acetone caused by ketosis, or an excess of protein in the diet producing ammonia in the breath. One of the reasons that cutting down on carbohydrates when dieting is so popular, is that we start to burn more fat quite quickly. This process generates molecules called ketones, according to Dr Harold Katz, also known as the ‘Bad Breath Guru’ in the US. Unfortunately the body gets rid of a type of ketone called acetone, via both urine and the breath, which is often described as smelling ‘like rotten fruit’. The good news is that if you have ‘ketosis breath’ it isn’t permanent. With the right treatment and a balanced approach to dieting, most people find it subsides after a few weeks, or months. Dr Katz outlines the BEST and WORST things to eat for bad breath. 16 of the best superfoods Thu, August 18, 2016 Here are 16 of the best superfoods foods that fight disease and promote good health. Eliminate peanut butter and dairy products: Bad breath caused by peanut butter, (known as the halitosis-causing paste) milk and lactose intolerance, is instantly recognisable and if you have it, you're likely to instantly put friends and co-workers off their lunch. Traces of milk/peanut butter remain in the mouth and oral cavity and are eaten up quickly by oral microbes. These microbes let off sulfurous molecules that really have a pungent odour. Fibrous fruits help to moisten the mouth. One of the most irritating symptoms from dry mouth (at night) is bad breat Continue reading >>

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Abstract Background: Ketogenic diets are used therapeutically to treat intractable seizures. Clinically, it appears that the maintenance of ketosis is crucial to the efficacy of the diet in ameliorating seizures. To understand how ketosis and seizure protection are related, a reliable, noninvasive measure of ketosis that can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort is needed. Objective: The objective was to determine which index, breath acetone or urinary acetoacetate, is more strongly related to the plasma ketones acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate. Design: After fasting overnight for 12 h, 12 healthy adults consumed 4 ketogenic meals over 12 h. Blood, breath, and urine samples were collected hourly. Blood was analyzed for plasma acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, breath for acetone, and urine for acetoacetate. Results: By the end of the 12-h dietary treatment, plasma acetoacetate, plasma β-hydroxybutyrate, and breath acetone had increased 3.5-fold, whereas urinary acetoacetate increased 13-fold when measured enzymatically and 25-fold when measured with urinary ketone dipsticks. Plasma acetoacetate was best predicted by breath acetone (R2 = 0.70, P < 0.0001). Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate was equally predicted by breath acetone and urinary acetoacetate (R2 = 0.54, P = 0.0040). Conclusions: Breath acetone is as good a predictor of ketosis as is urinary acetoacetate. Breath acetone analysis is noninvasive and can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort to patients. As an indicator of ketosis in epilepsy patients consuming a ketogenic diet, breath acetone may be useful for understanding the mechanism of the diet, elucidating the importance of ketosis in seizure protection, and ultimately, enhancing the efficacy of the diet by improving patient monitoring. I Continue reading >>

"paleo Breath" & Other Things You Didn't Know About Oral Health

With our culture's recent emphasis on health and wellness, it seems many of us are searching for the perfect diet, the perfect exercise routine, the best way to foster personal growth in relationships. The list goes on. So what about oral health? As an orthodontist, I'd say we don't give enough attention to this very crucial area of our body's well-being. Sure, we all know we should brush our teeth at least twice a day. Flossing is key, too — and gum health is just as important as dental hygiene. That said, we could all be a little bit more well-versed in the details of oral health. Here are five things you probably didn't know about oral health: 1. Paleo breath is a real thing. The latest most popular dieting craze is undoubtedly the low carb / high protein diet. Think Paleo, Atkins, South Beach and so on. Individuals on these diets may have noticed a number of changes since their dieting began and these changes aren't just limited to weight loss. I'm talking about "bad breath." Bad breath is caused by the excretion of the anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that do not need oxygen to survive) that live within your mouth. Normally, the bacteria present in our mouth are responsible for the breakdown of proteins found in our diet, saliva, mucous and phlegm. These anaerobic bacteria excrete sulfur compounds which are responsible for bad breath. The rotten egg smell (hydrogen sulfide) and the barnyard smell (methyl mercaptan) are known as VSCs — Volatile Sulfur Compounds. Due to the increase in higher protein foods for those on a low carb diet, the amount of Volatile Sulfur Compounds common found in the oral cavity increases dramatically and as such the breath of people on these diets gets worse. So to keep your mouth from smelling like a barnyard, drink plenty of water, brus Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

What’s Really Causing Your Bad Breath?

What’s Really Causing Your Bad Breath?

It’s common knowledge that improper brushing and flossing can lead to bad breath, but unsuspecting causes like stress and even the way you sleep at night can determine whether your breath is fresh or foul. “The cause of your bad breath may have nothing to do with how well you care for your smile,” says New York cosmetic dentist Irwin Smigel, DDS. “The source can lie in your hobbies, your habits and what you do day in and day out.” Flip through to learn what's causing your bad breath and how you can put an end to it for good. Bad breath comes down to one culprit: bacteria. According to Silver Spring, MD, cosmetic dentist Joseph Kravitz, DDS, There are more than 3,000 species of bacteria in the mouth. In order to survive, they feed off of protein molecules in the saliva, food particles and dead cells on the tongue. In doing so, a byproduct, volatile sulfur compounds, is released, which emit an odor. “These compounds can smell fishy, like rotten eggs,” says Atlanta cosmetic dentist Ronald Goldstein, DDS. “However, the key to curing bad breath is to figure out what’s causing the influx of bacteria and treat the problem, not just the symptoms. This may be tricky as some bacteria result from causes you’d least expect.” Sleeping on Your Back The position your head is angled when you sleep at night can affect how your breath smells in the morning. Sleeping on your back, for example, forces gravity to pull the jaw downward, causing you to breathe through your mouth, rather than your nose. When this happens, saliva production is slowed. “Saliva is the natural cleanser in the mouth that rinses away the bad bacteria,” says Dr. Smigel, who points out that saliva production, which naturally slows while sleeping, is at its lowest when you breathe through your Continue reading >>

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