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What Is Ketosis Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

Caveman Breath

Caveman Breath

When I first tell people I’m on a Primal Blueprint diet emulating our ancient ancestors, the witty ones are usually quick with a clever comment or two, usually referencing the Flintstones, heavy brow ridges, monosyllabic grunts, or some combination of the three. A hearty laugh is shared (mine being exceedingly polite), and they’ll go on to ask if I’ve experienced increased hair growth, whether or not I met my wife by clubbing her over the head, and if I’ve got caveman breath (always accompanied by a theatrical, exaggerated step backward). What would I do without such comedians? I gotta admit, though, they might have a point about the caveman breath. Although I don’t have a problem with it personally (unless my wife has kept quiet all these years), bad breath is a common complaint I hear about low-carb dieters. Strangely enough, I rarely hear it from actual low-carbers, but rather from overly critical skeptics. Still, bad breath does happen to everyone, and I for one would be wary of engaging Grok in a close heart to heart talk over some fermented mammoth milk. Even on our own comment boards, reader madMUHHH complained about having constant bad breath. Of course, he was also eating loads of garlic and onions, which are notorious causes of bad breath (regardless of the overall diet), but it does go to show that just because we’re eating healthy Primal foods, it doesn’t mean we’re immune to the ravages of bad breath. Bacteria/Tooth Decay Most bad breath you encounter is probably due to poor dental hygiene. Brushing isn’t enough for some people; sometimes you need to physically remove chunks of food from between your teeth. I doubt Grok was a big brusher, but he probably picked his teeth with bones or sharpened sticks (I think the annoying sensation of mea Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Ketosis Breath Have You Down? Beat It Today!

Your Ketogenic diet is going great! You’re losing weight, feeling better, and your prepared for a healthy life in Ketosis! Only problem is when you go to tell anyone about your diet they get a look of disgust and cover their nose. You ask a friend what he thinks the issue might be, and he only has one thing to say: “Ketosis Breath.” Ketosis Breath is an unfortunate side effect that befalls many Keto dieters. The important thing to remember is that it’s not just you, and it isn’t forever. There’s also an explanation and a solution for it. Why does Ketosis Breath happen? The Ketogenic diet is predicated on your body using fat as fuel instead of carbs. As you know, when your body begins to use fat as fuel, it releases Ketones into your bloodstream. Physicians suspect that the Ketosis breath comes from one of the Ketones know as Acetone. Acetone on your breath can manifest itself in a fruity, or rotten fruit smell. You have to remember, Acetone is the same chemical that’s in Nail Polish remover, which isn’t known for it’s amazing smell. The good news is that Ketosis means you’re hitting your dietary needs. The bad news is that you’re not getting a date any time soon. Just kidding, you’ll get dates just fine. Below we’ve listed out ways to deal with Ketosis breath. The wrong ones and the right ones. The Wrong Way to deal with Ketosis Breath A common reaction to having bad breath is to go to the nearest store and buy some breath freshening gum to mask the scent. No harm no foul, right? Well not exactly. Since you’re on the Ketogenic diet, you have to be aware of which brands of gum you’re going to chomp into. The same brands that produce the sugar spiked candy that we steer clear of produce some of the most popular breath enhancing gums on the ma Continue reading >>

What To Do About Keto Breath From A Low-carb Diet

What To Do About Keto Breath From A Low-carb Diet

Fasting, paleo, and low-carb diets are an important health practice for some people. But a common side effect of the weight loss from a low-carb diet is bad breath (often called keto breath), caused by a process called ketosis. You’re not going to give up on your diet, of course, so what’s the solution? What Causes Keto Breath on a Low-Carb or Paleo Diet First of all, you’re not alone. Most people on some form of low carbohydrate diet tend to have worse breath than those who use other methods of dieting. This is mainly due to the food low-carb dieters are now eating and how those foods are reacting in the body. Low-carb diets work by limiting the amount of carbs entering the body, so your body must then look to stored fat for fuel. When your body burns this stored fat, a certain chemical called ketone is made. Ketone exits the body in two ways: through urine and through your mouth. This “keto breath” is what causes bad breath when you’re eating low-carb or paleo, or fasting. Certain foods are also to blame. High-protein foods produce more sulfur when broken down into particles. These particles tend to stay on your tongue and in your mouth longer, especially while you’re asleep, or if you don’t brush in between meals. Because your mouth doesn’t produce saliva when you’re asleep (and for good reason!), these sulfur compounds build up overnight and can really give your partner a wake-up call in the morning when you roll over for a good-morning kiss! An easy way to combat this (and hack your sleep at the same time): mouth taping. Bad Breath Causes Beyond Diet Certain lifestyle changes we make to lose weight or get healthy can also be the culprit of bad breath. Most common are the below. Skipping meals: Without anything to chew, saliva production slows do Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

Why Does Your Breath Stink On Low-carb Diets?

Why Does Your Breath Stink On Low-carb Diets?

Why It Happens Carbohydrates normally comprise your body's main source of energy, because carbohydrates break down quickly and easily into glucose and pass into cells, supplying them with the energy they need. When you follow a low-carbohydrate diet, your body doesn't ingest enough carbohydrate to fuel all your cells. So your body begins to break down stored fat as an energy source. During this process, your body creates incompletely burned byproducts called ketones. Ketones pass from your body in urine -- that's why people on low-carb diets often test their urine -- and, less pleasantly, through exhalation. Ketones produce an acetone-like smell, which causes the distinctive breath of ketosis. Carb Limits Not all people on a low-carb diet produce ketones. While everyone enters ketosis at their own pace, most people don't until their carbohydrate intake falls below 50 grams of carbohydrate per day, Dr. Peter Attia explains on his website, The Eating Academy. In many cases, you won't enter ketosis unless you take in 20 grams of carbohydrates or less each day, MayoClinic.com states. Some diets that call themselves low-carbohydrate diets deliberately keep the amount of carbohydrates you ingest well above this level, specifically to keep you from going into ketosis. Steps to Take Keto breath means that your diet is working; you're breaking down fat and using it for energy. But that doesn't mean you -- or your closest friends -- have to like it. You can take steps to reduce the smell. Drinking plenty of water washes the ketones out in your urine, leaving fewer to expel via your lungs. Gums, mints and other breath fresheners can help temporarily, but watch out -- many contain carbohydrates. Look for brands that use artificial sugars or you might unwittingly put yourself out of Continue reading >>

Keto Breath: Causes And Solutions

Keto Breath: Causes And Solutions

Have you ever heard the term “caveman breath”? If you are on a ketogenic diet, chances are, you have. And you have most likely heard the term, from those who are critical of your keto diet. While they may not be completely wrong, they may not be completely correct in their assumptions of the status of your ketosis breath. First off, bad breath can have a few different sources. So, it is not fair to assume that someone who is following a ketogenic diet has bad breath caused by the diet, when it could be other factors. The food we eat can cause bad breath. If you have ever sat by someone who has eaten garlic, you know it. Garlic and onions have a reputations for causing undesirable breath. And they seem to stay with you for a couple of days. For some people, garlic and onions can cause digestive upset. This can also be a cause of bad breath, if you are not digesting certain foods properly. You tend to see this in folks with lactose-intolerance. If you are trying to improve your breath, it is a good idea to limit these foods for a couple weeks. You can then try re-introducing them in small amounts, and see how your body reacts. Another cause for bad breath is poor dental hygiene. If you are not consistently removing large chunks of food from between your teeth, that could be your problem right there. If you have eliminated all the options above, and you still have bad breath, it could be "ketosis breath" from burning ketones. When your body is using ketones as its primary fuel source, it is removed from the body in the form of exhaling and urination. This may cause an odd scent, which is usually sweet or fruity. It is a very different smell than halitosis, which is very unpleasant due to tooth decay or gum disease. Ketosis breath cure: Keto bad breath will usually diss Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis

What Is Ketosis

Ketosis is a metabolic reaction that occurs in your body, when following the OPTIFAST® VLCD™ Program Intensive level. This means your body shifts from using primarily carbohydrates to using fats as an energy source resulting in a reduction of body fat stores. Ketones are by-products that are created when your body has to switch to fats for energy. It means your stores of glycogen or carbohydrates have been depleted. One of the consequences of ketosis is a decrease in appetite, which helps make following the OPTIFAST® VLCD™ Program Intensive level much easier. As the OPTIFAST® VLCD™ Program causes only a mild ketosis; it is a very safe approach to weight loss. Before your body transitions into ketosis, you will most likely feel hungry and you may experience some side-effects such as: Fatigue Lack of concentration Nausea & Headaches These side-effects should only last about 3 days and most symptoms usually pass by days 4-6. This is what we refer to as the 3 day challenge. Following the initial 3 day challenge you will experience an increase in energy and reduction in appetite which, in the Intensive level, will result in a consistent and successful weight loss. It is important to know that these are typical symptoms and you should try to stick to the program as prescribed or otherwise you will simply pro-long these first few days of the OPTIFAST® VLCD™ Program. Of course, if you are concerned about your symptoms or if they persist, speak to your doctor, dietitian or pharmacist as they can advise how to overcome or correct these before coming off the program. Once your body is in ketosis, any excess ketones that your body does not use for energy are excreted via your urine and breath (thus the incidence of bad breath in some cases). This therefore allows you to Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Bad Breath, How To Cure It

Keto Diet Bad Breath, How To Cure It

When eating according to a low carb diet it is easy that you could get a bad breath. This phenomen is usually called keto diet bad breath or low carb bad breath. The bad breath from the low carb diet is usually caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath when your body is burning fat. This is called ketones and happens when you get into ketosis. You can use this bad breath as a way to tell that you have actually come into ketosis. According to Kenneth Burrell who is the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association this is very natural. Carbohydrates aren’t readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem Usually when having a keto diet bad breath or a low carb bad breath people assume it is due to poor oral hygiene. This is however not true since that brushing, flossing and scraping your tongue or teeth will not help with this bad breath. How to help to hide keto diet bad breath You can hide the bad breath with things like mouthwashes or chewing gum but there might still be a possibility that the smell will come through. Another option is to get some sugarless mints that will not impact your low carb diet. If you have a metabolic cause of bad breath, there is very little the dentist can do; you have to change your diet Other options to help with the keto diet bad breath is to drink more water and swish it around in the mouth to at least get out the food particles that could add to the odor. Another option might be to even add on some carbohydrates to your diet. It is not optimal for someone on a low carb diet but if you really need to avoid the keto diet bad breath this might be something you need to do. However you n Continue reading >>

No More Dragon Breath!

No More Dragon Breath!

Too many people who eat low carb diets believe that they have to live with the intense bad breath nicknamed "ketobreath" if they are to keep their carbs down either to control their blood sugar or lose weight. That's because they believe that the bad breath is a sign that they are eating what is called a "ketogenic diet" which some dieters and low carb enthusiasts believe makes it much easier to burn off fat. The term "ketogenic" simply means "producing ketones." Ketones are a byproduct of fat digestion. They become significant when you are eating so few grams of carbohydrate each day because at that point most of your cells switch over to burning fats, including ketones, rather than glucose. You can tell when you have entered a ketogenic state because your body will dump a great deal of water when this happens, causing a weight loss of anywhere from two to six pounds within a day or two. When you exit the ketogenic state, those same water-related pounds come right back. Why this happens is explained in greater detail on this web page. Unfortunately, most people who cut carbs low enough to remain in a ketogenic state for more than a few weeks develop a distinctive and truly awful bad breath that they assume is a necessary part of eating a ketogenic diet. This is not true but widely believed. It is also the major reason why the loved ones of low carb dieter, after a period of patience, may start undermining the low carbers' diet, tempting them with carbs in the hope that if they ruin their loved one's diet they will no longer have to live with the wretched smell of that "ketobreath." This is rational behavior on the part of those loved ones. The bad breath--which the dieter usually can't themselves smell--is often so strong it makes riding in a car with the dieter unplea Continue reading >>

Measuring Breath Acetone For Monitoring Fat Loss: Review

Measuring Breath Acetone For Monitoring Fat Loss: Review

Go to: Introduction Measurements of endogenous acetone in breath have been made for over 50 years. Early studies examined the effect of caloric intake (fasting and calorie restriction diets), dietary macronutrient composition, and exercise on breath acetone 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. While people with and without obesity participated in these investigations, the focus was on the effects of fasting and diabetes. The breath acetone concentration (BrAce) was understood to be a non‐invasive measure of ketosis. Ketosis describes the elevation of ketone bodies in the blood. A range of ketosis levels exists. Healthy individuals on standard mixed diets (i.e., moderate to high carbohydrate content) have a basal ketosis while individuals with uncontrolled diabetes have extremely elevated ketosis, ketoacidosis. In all cases, ketosis describes the quantity of circulating ketone bodies. Increases in ketosis correspond to increases in ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are produced as a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. When the liver metabolizes circulating free fatty acids, these acids are transformed into acetyl‐CoA, a molecule used in the production of energy. Depending on the glucose level, acetyl‐CoA can be diverted to produce acetoacetate, the first of three ketone bodies. From acetoacetate, two other ketone bodies, β‐hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and acetone, are produced by enzymatic degradation or spontaneous decarboxylation, respectively 6, 7. All three ketone bodies circulate in the bloodstream. Acetone, because of its small size, diffuses into the air spaces of the lung and appears in the exhaled breath. Endogenous acetone production is closely related to fat metabolism through the intermediary acetoacetate. Efforts over the past 20 years have better elucidated the relationshi Continue reading >>

How To Cure Bad Breath With A High Protein Diet

How To Cure Bad Breath With A High Protein Diet

A high-protein, low-carb diet can put your body into ketosis -- a state where your body is burning fat instead of glucose for energy. When you limit your carb intake, your body has to use stored fat for energy, which can be a short-term way to lose a few pounds. When your body burns fat, by-products called ketones are released. You'll expel most of them in urine and perspiration, but some will be expelled in your breath -- and ketones don't smell good. According to a survey by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, 40 percent of people following a low-carb diet reported having bad breath. Video of the Day Don't try to cover bad breath with mints or gum. Instead, brush your teeth more often. Brush, floss and scrape your tongue to help clear the ketones from your mouth. Scraping the back of your tongue will help get rid of most of the problem. Practice good oral hygiene two to three times daily. Drink more water. Keeping your mouth moist may help dispel "keto breath." Drinking water will help restore the proper acid/alkaline balance in your mouth. If your mouth is dry in the winter, try a humidifier in your bedroom. Drinking lots of liquids will also help you pass more ketones in your urine, rather than through exhalation. Remember, exhalation is another means for your body to rid itself of waste. Eat carbs. The only way to truly stop the bad breath caused by ketosis is to take your body out of ketosis. You can choose to eat low-glycemic index carbs that have little effect on your blood sugar, or high-protein carbs such as legumes. Eat more vegetables and fruits for sweeter-smelling breath. If your body can't expel ketones quickly enough, too many may build up in your bloodstream. The buildup of ketones in your bloodstream can lead to a life-threatening coma, Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

What is ketosis? Being in ketosis is truly a magical thing. Ketosis happens when your body starts producing ketone bodies instead of utilizing carbohydrates as energy. Both can be used as energy sources, but I find that converting to a fat-burner over a carbohydrate-burner to be most favorable. Signs of being in ketosis There are a few signs that could suggest you’re in ketosis: a metallic taste in mouth strong smelling urine random bursts of happiness (it’s weird, but it’s true!) decreased appetite How to get into ketosis The best way to get into ketosis is to immediately drop all major carb sources in your diet and focus on high-quality fats. Some find that going extremely low carb for a couple days will jumpstart ketone production and ultimately reaching a state of ketosis. Initially when you first remove a majority of carbohydrates from your diet, most people experience signs of lethargy and flu-like symptoms. This is what people consider the “low carb flu.” The low carb flu could last anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks. It’s important to stay extremely hydrated on a ketogenic diet, so much make sure you’re getting enough water and electrolytes. If you’re one of the lucky ones, you won’t experience any low carb flu symptoms at all. Carbohydrate tolerance varies from person to person to maintain a ketogenic state. Some report that they can eat up to 80 grams and still be in ketosis. A safe spot for most people seems to be between 20-30 grams. Benefits of being in ketosis You will find it hard to believe that an array of benefits can be obtained from following a ketogenic diet, but the proof is in the research! Some of these include: Effortless weight loss Awesome blood sugar regulation Reduced blood pressure Reduced inflammation Appetite Continue reading >>

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The keto (low carb, LCHF or whatever you want to call it) diet isn’t all bacon, weight loss and happiness. One of the side effects of being in ketosis can be bad breath, also known as keto breath. Sometimes you get it when you’re starting out with a ketogenic diet and have the keto flu. I’ve learned how to keep keto breath under control so it doesn’t bother me much these days. But when I get dehydrated I start getting that metallic taste in my mouth and know it’s probably keto breath. Luckily I know how to fix it now! Who gets it? Since I’ve been on my keto journey, I’ve encountered 3 types of people: People who don’t get keto breath at all – I don’t know why they’re so lucky. Ketosis just doesn’t seem to affect their breath at all. I have no idea why their bodies react differently. People who sometimes get keto breath – Some people don’t feel the keto breath for days and then suddenly it hits them. It can also be worse around the same time each day. If I had to guess, I’d say it’s when they’re starting to get hungry. People who constantly have keto breath – They have it 24/7, some of them can get rid of it temporarily with tricks (I´ll list some below) but some are unfortunately just beyond that. Honestly, I’m not a medical professional and I can’t explain why everyone’s different when it comes to keto breath. You can have two people who eat the exact same low carb food, one of them gets it and the other one doesn’t. Maybe it has something to do with the individuals metabolism. I’d love to hear from anyone who can explain this to me. What is keto breath like? Most people describe it as a fruity, acetone like smell. It can be quite strong. Some people who suffer from it say that they can feel it and almost taste it, like a Continue reading >>

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