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What Is Ketosis And Is It Safe

Is Ketosis Safe? The Million Dollar Question Answered

Is Ketosis Safe? The Million Dollar Question Answered

There’s a common misconception that being in a state of ketosis may be harmful to the body. This misconception arises because nutritional ketosis is being confused with ketoacidosis and the two things couldn’t be more different. Is ketosis safe? You bet! What is Ketosis? Nutritional ketosis is when the body burns its own fat as its primary fuel source. For a person to enter a state of nutritional ketosis, they will need to be eating a low carbohydrate diet. This is because in order for the body to switch from sugar burning mode (which is its default setting whilst carbohydrates are being consumed) to fat burning mode, the body needs to deplete its stores of stored sugar (glycogen). I was shocked to learn that in a fully grown adult, there’s only about 5g of glucose (sugar) in their entire blood stream, which is about one level teaspoon! When excess sugar is consumed, the body converts excess sugar to to fat, and stores it as a backup fuel supply. The fat is stored and deposited as body fat – enabling the body to access it as a fuel source if glycogen levels were to drop in the future. When carbohydrates are consumed, the pancreas is stimulated to excrete insulin. Excess glucose in the blood stream is toxic and the body does everything that it can to get rid of it. Insulin’s job is to send a signal to the brain to tell the body to be in sugar burning mode in order for the body to get rid of the excess sugar circulating in the blood stream. Whilst there is excess sugar present, the body will never switch to fat burning mode. Whilst a person consumes high amounts of carbohydrates and excessive protein, their glycogen levels will never deplete enough to send the signal from the brain to switch fuel burning modes, preventing the kickstart of nutritional ketosis. Th Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Children? An Evaluation Of Biochemical And Growth Parameters. † 473

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Children? An Evaluation Of Biochemical And Growth Parameters. † 473

The ketogenic diet has been used since the 1920's as an alternative therapy to antiepileptic drugs (AED) in children with intractable seizures. The diet is high in fat (up to 90% of calories) and low in carbohydrate and protein. To date, there have been no studies evaluating growth and laboratory parameters in children on the diet. In this retrospective study, biochemical and growth data were collected from 12 children (age: 4.0 ± 3.6 yrs) pre- and 6 months on the ketogenic diet. The diet contained 90% of calories from fat (P/S ratio 4.4), 10% of calories from protein/carbohydrate supplemented with additional vitamins and minerals. Biochemical data included hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), white blood cell count (WBC), red blood cell count (RBC), platlets, total cholesterol (TC), total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (AST), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase(ALT), calcium, phosphorus, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine. All children demonstrated decreased seizure number. There was no significant change in Hb, Hct, WBC, RBC, platlets, TC, TP, Alb, calcium, phosphorus, or creatinine 6 months after starting the diet; all parameters remained within the normal range. There were significant decreases in AST (pre- vs. 6 months; 49.2 ± 28.7 units/L vs. 32.5 ± 19.3 units/L, P ≤ 0.05), and BUN (11.2 ± 5.8 mg/dl vs. 7.5 ± 2.4 mg/dl, P ≤ 0.01). ALT levels normalized (34.0 ± 29.0 units/L vs. 17.2 ± 8.9 units/L) although the decrease was not statistically significant (P = 0.06). There was a significant increase in height (93.0 ± 20.7cm vs. 99.7 ± 20.5 cm, P ≤ 0.001) and weight (16.9 ± 9.5 kg vs. 18.2 ± 8.8 kg, P≤ 0.05). Weight for height was similar pre-diet and at 6 months (106± 15% vs. 104 ± 18%). These findings sug Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. First, it's necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven't eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn't happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to "adapt" to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the "low-carb flu" or "keto flu." In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead of carbs. It can take some time for your body to adapt to this. In the beginning of ketosis, you may experience a range of negative symptoms. They are often referred to as "low-carb flu" or "keto flu" because they resemble symptom Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

​what Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is It Safe?

​what Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is It Safe?

The ketogenic diet is all the rage in the low-carbohydrate dieting world. It’s so low-carb in fact that many people wonder if it’s a safe long-term diet. How is the keto diet (short for “ketogenic”) diet different than the Atkins diet plan? Is it an effective and healthy means of weight loss? Is it safe??? These are just some of the many questions that we hear surrounding the keto diet in the health and fitness community. While any diet that requires sacrifice and adjustments to your daily routine (and this diet requires more of that than most, with the exception of veganism) will take some effort to maintain, the overall benefits may be worth the commitment. A variety of celebrities, fitness personalities, and doctors endorse the ketogenic eating plan and its philosophies for overall health improvement and quick weight loss. According to advocates of the ketogenic diet, forcing your body into ketosis could be the answer to long-term fat loss and better health. For years, we’ve heard about the benefits of low-carb eating and consuming healthy fats. We absolutely agree with the low-carb approach for weight loss, because it is the main principle in our 21-Day Fat Loss Challenge. Below, we will explore what the ketogenic diet entails, including the change in lifestyle, and discuss its safety. The Ketogenic Diet What is the keto diet? You might already know that the keto diet is a low-carb diet plan. You might not know that it was originally designed for patients with epilepsy, as Dr. Axe discusses in his post on the subject. Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medical center initially found that fasting helped treat seizures in patients with epilepsy. How did this turn into what we know as the keto diet today? Since fasting wasn’t a healthy long-term option for elimin Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis? Is It Safe For You … Or Is It Making You Fatter And Sicker?

What Is Ketosis? Is It Safe For You … Or Is It Making You Fatter And Sicker?

Although it’s been around for almost 100 years, ketogenics have made resurgence in the diet world. A ketogenic diet (Also known as LCHF for low carb, high fat) is where you deplete your body of glucose and instead burn fat for energy. Note: This is not for everyone. Some people do better on medium to high carb diets. Ketogenic diets seem to really help the extreme insulin resistant, those with neurological issues such as dementia, those with inflammatory disease or obese. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy, so it will be chosen over any other energy source. But with a Ketogenic Diet, your body has to go to an alternate source. The Ketogenic Diet has quite a following, especially among those with neurological issues such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s. The idea behind a ketogenic diet is to get your body into ketosis [NOT keto-acidosis (Diabetes Type 1 disease]. When eating low carb, your body doesn’t produce insulin. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your blood steam, by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed, and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. Ketosis is a metabolic process that occurs when the body does not have enough glucose for energy. With a decrease in carbs, stored fats are broken down for energy, resulting in a build-up of acids called ketones (produced by the liver) within the body. We encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. THE MAIN ID Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Safe For An 18 Year Old?

Is Ketosis Safe For An 18 Year Old?

Talk to a doctor. I know it may be a while to wait, but you can seriously ruin your health with a diet. Your doctor will be able to confirm your suspicions, and create a healthy, balanced, effective diet for you. Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Duck Dodgers October 14, 2014 Peter, An article by Per Wikholm was published in this month’s LCHF Magasinet, where Per demonstrates that the Inuit could not have been in ketosis given that the scientific literature is abundantly clear, over and over again, that the Inuit consumed too much protein, and more importantly, Per debunks Stefansson’s claims for high fat with writing from his own books—Stef admitted in the pemmican recipes that Arctic caribou was too lean to make pemmican that supported ketosis. The most popular LCHF bloggers in Sweden, Andreas Eenfeldt/Diet Doctor and Annika Dahlquist have reluctantly agreed with Per’s findings—admitting that the Inuit were likely not ketogenic from their diet. I’ve put together a comprehensive review of the scientific literature regarding the Inuit, encompassing over two dozen studies, spanning 150 years, with references from explorers, including Stefansson. In the comments section of that post, Per gives a brief overview of how he was able to prove Stefansson’s observations on high fat intake were flawed. The post is a review of all the available literature that I could find (over two dozen studies). But, the literature certainly does not in any way support ketosis from the Inuit diet due to such high protein consumption. As Per (and Stefansson) points out, the caribou is too lean and as the many quotes show, the Inuit were saving their blubber and fat for the long dark Winter to power their oil lamps and heat their igloos. Again and again, we see that in the literature, as even Stefansson admits this. As far as glycogen is concerned, their glycogen intake is probably not worth scrutinizing given the well-documented high protein consumption in every published study. It really is besides the point. But, interest Continue reading >>

How Long Can You Stay In Ketosis Safely?

How Long Can You Stay In Ketosis Safely?

Are you looking for a diet for weight-loss or fat-loss? If so then you might be interested in ketosis. The question is whether you can stay on it permanently. That’s because it’s critical for any ‘diet” to become part of your everyday life and eating habits. It’s important to first understand what it is all about. It’s a natural state of the human body when it’s fueled almost 100% by body fat. This state takes place during a low-carb or “keto” diet as well as during fasting. It’s important to understand how this process is related to fat loss. The term originates from the fact that the human produce produces tin fuel molecules known as “ketones.” When the body doesn’t have enough blood sugar/glucose it gets energy from this source. The body produces chemicals when it gets a very low supply of carbs and a moderate amount of protein. The liver’s fat produces ketones then the body and brain use it for fuel. The process is especially important for the brain since the organ can only run from glucose/ketones. Medical research shows that early humans probably experienced the state very often. The reason is that hunter-gatherer societies ate a high-meat diet and had less access to carbohydrates than modern humans. As a result human bodies evolved so they could get energy from fat even though it mimicked starvation mode. Today there are various reasons why people use the ketogenic meal plan. Some of the most common ones are to lose weight or control epilepsy. The firm supporters point out the health benefits of the diet but others note that it’s a dangerous “hack” of the body’s regular metabolic system. These are the benefits to this process: Less eating due to no appetite More fat loss from abdominal cavity Lower blood sugar/insulin levels Lo Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Lift Weights In Ketosis?

Is It Safe To Lift Weights In Ketosis?

Yes, it is. I do that all the time. Ketosis can be of different degrees - from mild to deep, depending on the concentration of ketone bodies in your blood. Lifting weights in ketosis does nothing harmful to your body - in fact it accelerates fat loss, so yes - it is safe. A different question is how effective it is. Some research shows that the process of generating maximal muscle effort is almost always glycolytic (i.e. - it depends on glucose). From that perspective it may seem that to be able to hit Personal Records and work with maximal weights, you pretty much need carbs. But here is my take on this: First, with any sensible training protocol, you don’t always hit PRs on each training day. In fact, constantly working out with maximal weights is as counterproductive as constantly working with low weights. If your training schedule is properly designed, your intensity would fluctuate and you would only need to hit PRs once every couple of months or so (if you are already moving massive weights - that frequency is going to be even lower). During the times of “normal” sub-maximal workouts you should be OK in any case. Second, you never really run out of glycogen, even when in deep ketosis (as your liver always synthesizes some through gluconeogenesis using glycerol as substrate and storing whatever low amounts of carbs you ingest). So, even if your muscle glycogen reserves may be lower than when you carb-load (at least in theory) - there should be enough to support that one maximal effort. Third, you may not even be after muscle mass gain - perhaps your primary goal is strength gain. If that’s the case, studies show that strength gains are unaffected under ketosis. And - although perhaps not documented in any formal “studies”, I either personally know or ha Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis And Is It Safe?!

What Is Ketosis And Is It Safe?!

The Question- Is Ketosis safe for you? If you've come to this article you've heard both good and bad things about Ketosis. Ketosis is one of 2 natural metabolic processes that provides energy to your cells. The other process is called Glycolysis and is the utilization of glucose (derived from carbs, sugars, and excess protein) for energy. Ketosis is the utilization of ketones for cellular energy, ketones are normally derived from fat when there is extended lack of glucose. It's undeniable that this state has many benefits which are outlined here but is it safe for everyone and what are the disadvantages?! Dr. D’Agostino and fellow USF researcher Andrew Koutnik stress that “individuals with liver cancer or elevated liver enzymes, pancreatitis, fat malabsorption issues, lipid metabolism disorders, gall bladder removal or obstruction, or those taking a drug such as a steroid which may elevate blood glucose levels and inhibit the ability to achieve ketosis, should refrain from following a ketogenic diet.” They have reviewed countless studies and I find them trustworthy. Diabetes is the thing that many people misunderstand. Please don't get Ketosis confused with Ketoacidosis! It's not the same thing. A Ketogenic Lifestyle doesn't create ketoacidosis which is a dangerous diabetic condition cause by the inability to produce adequate insulin. On the other hand, Ketosis improves insulin sensitivity because of the lack of sugar and has been shown to improve cholesterol. The Answer- Reader, fat loss isn't the only major benefit! I do it for the hormone balance, energy, focus, and reduction of the incredible inflammation I used to live with from sports. If you don't have one of the above mentioned conditions then the only potential drawback is if you don't know how to prepare Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

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