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What Is Ketone Formula?

Organic Chemistry/ketones And Aldehydes

Organic Chemistry/ketones And Aldehydes

Aldehydes () and ketones () are both carbonyl compounds. They are organic compounds in which the carbonyl carbon is connected to C or H atoms on either side. An aldehyde has one or both vacancies of the carbonyl carbon satisfied by a H atom, while a ketone has both its vacancies satisfied by carbon. 3 Preparing Aldehydes and Ketones Ketones are named by replacing the -e in the alkane name with -one. The carbon chain is numbered so that the ketone carbon, called the carbonyl group, gets the lowest number. For example, would be named 2-butanone because the root structure is butane and the ketone group is on the number two carbon. Alternatively, functional class nomenclature of ketones is also recognized by IUPAC, which is done by naming the substituents attached to the carbonyl group in alphabetical order, ending with the word ketone. The above example of 2-butanone can also be named ethyl methyl ketone using this method. If two ketone groups are on the same structure, the ending -dione would be added to the alkane name, such as heptane-2,5-dione. Aldehydes replace the -e ending of an alkane with -al for an aldehyde. Since an aldehyde is always at the carbon that is numbered one, a number designation is not needed. For example, the aldehyde of pentane would simply be pentanal. The -CH=O group of aldehydes is known as a formyl group. When a formyl group is attached to a ring, the ring name is followed by the suffix "carbaldehyde". For example, a hexane ring with a formyl group is named cyclohexanecarbaldehyde. Aldehyde and ketone polarity is characterized by the high dipole moments of their carbonyl group, which makes them rather polar molecules. They are more polar than alkenes and ethers, though because they lack hydrogen, they cannot participate in hydrogen bonding like Continue reading >>

Aldehydes And Ketones

Aldehydes And Ketones

Introduction We will focus more specifically on the organic compounds that incorporate carbonyl groups: aldehydes and ketones. Key Terms Aldehyde Formyl group Ketone Hydrogen bonding Hydration Hydrate Objectives Identify IUPAC names for simple aldehydes and ketones Describe the boiling point and solubility characteristics of aldehydes and ketones relative to those of alkanes and alcohols Characterize the process of nucleophilic addition to the carbonyl group The carbonyl group is shown below in the context of synthesizing alcohols. This functional group is the key component of aldehydes and ketones, which we will discuss here. Nomenclature for Aldehydes and Ketones Aldehydes and ketones are structurally similar; the only difference is that for an aldehyde, the carbonyl group has at most one substituent alkyl group, whereas the carbonyl group in a ketone has two. Several examples of aldehydes and ketones are depicted below. Aldehydes are named by replacing the -e ending of an alkane with -al (similarly to the use of -ol in alcohols). The base molecule is the longest carbon chain ending with the carbonyl group. Furthermore, the carbon atom in the carbonyl group is assumed to be carbon 1, so a number is not needed in the IUPAC name to identify the location of the doubly bonded oxygen atom. If the chain contains two carbonyl groups, one at each end, the correct suffix is -dial (used in the same manner as -diol for compounds with two hydroxyl groups). An example aldehyde is shown below with its IUPAC name. One- and two-carbon aldehydes have common names (one of which you will likely be familiar with) in addition to their systematic names. Both names are acceptable. Sometimes, the carbonyl group plus one proton (called a formyl group) must be treated separately for nomenclatu Continue reading >>

14.9: Aldehydes And Ketones: Structure And Names

14.9: Aldehydes And Ketones: Structure And Names

Identify the general structure for an aldehyde and a ketone. Use common names to name aldehydes and ketones. Use the IUPAC system to name aldehydes and ketones. The next functional group we consider, the carbonyl group, has a carbon-to-oxygen double bond. Carbonyl groups define two related families of organic compounds: the aldehydes and the ketones. The carbonyl group is ubiquitous in biological compounds. It is found in carbohydrates, fats, proteins, nucleic acids, hormones, and vitamins—organic compounds critical to living systems. In a ketone, two carbon groups are attached to the carbonyl carbon atom. The following general formulas, in which R represents an alkyl group and Ar stands for an aryl group, represent ketones. In an aldehyde, at least one of the attached groups must be a hydrogen atom. The following compounds are aldehydes: In condensed formulas, we use CHO to identify an aldehyde rather than COH, which might be confused with an alcohol. This follows the general rule that in condensed structural formulas H comes after the atom it is attached to (usually C, N, or O). The carbon-to-oxygen double bond is not shown but understood to be present. Because they contain the same functional group, aldehydes and ketones share many common properties, but they still differ enough to warrant their classification into two families. Here are some simple IUPAC rules for naming aldehydes and ketones: The stem names of aldehydes and ketones are derived from those of the parent alkanes, defined by the longest continuous chain (LCC) of carbon atoms that contains the functional group. For an aldehyde, drop the -e from the alkane name and add the ending -al. Methanal is the IUPAC name for formaldehyde, and ethanal is the name for acetaldehyde. For a ketone, drop the -e from t Continue reading >>

Dimethyl Ketone

Dimethyl Ketone

OVERVIEW Dimethyl ketone (DYE-meth-el KEY-tone) is a clear, colorless, highly volatile and highly flammable liquid with a characteristic sweet odor and taste. The compound is almost universally known in chemistry laboratories and industrial applications by its common name of acetone. KEY FACTS OTHER NAMES: 2-propanone; acetone FORMULA: CH3COCH3 ELEMENTS: Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen COMPOUND TYPE: Ketone (organic) STATE: Liquid MOLECULAR WEIGHT: 58.08 g/mol MELTING POINT: −94.7°C (−138°F) BOILING POINT: 56.05°C (132.9°F) SOLUBILITY: Miscible with water, alcohol, ether, benzene, and chloroform Acetone was apparently first prepared in 1610 by the French alchemist Jean Béguin (c. 1550–c. 1650). Béguin obtained acetone by heating lead acetate (also known as Saturn's salt) to a high temperature. He obtained a sweet-smelling, very flammable liquid that he named "burning spirit of Saturn." One of the first uses to which the substance was put was as a solvent in the extraction of the active constituents of opium. In 1833, the French chemist Antoine Bussy (1794–1882) gave the compound its modern name of acetone. The correct chemical formula for acetone was determined independently in 1832 by the French chemist Jean Baptiste André Dumas (1800–1884) and the German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803–1873). HOW IT IS MADE Most of the acetone produced today is made by one of four methods: In the Hock process, cumene [C6H5CH(CH3)2] is first oxidized to produce cumene hydroperoxide [C6H5C(CH3)2COOH], which is then reduced to produce acetone and phenol (C6H5OH); or Isopropyl alcohol (2-propanol; CH3CHOHCH3) is oxidized over a catalyst to obtained acetone; or Butane (C4H10) is oxidized to obtain acetone; or Acetone is obtained as a by-product of the manufacture of glycerol [C Continue reading >>

A Simple Formula For 7 Important Aldehyde/ketone Reactions

A Simple Formula For 7 Important Aldehyde/ketone Reactions

Here’s one thing you’re going to learn about reactions of aldehydes and ketones. There’s a LOT of repetition in the mechanism. You’ll see this in more detail soon, but let’s get a taste of how things work. Imagine you’re a guitar player. And someone tells you that you need to learn how to play 14 songs… ASAP. Sounds scary, right? But what if you then found that each of these songs had the exact same sequence of chords, and only differed in their lyrics? That’s a lot easier. We’re going to go through 14 reactions in this post. BUT… before you run away screaming… it’s really just ONE reaction… that works on both aldehydes and ketones… that has seven different variants. That sounds a lot simpler, right? All of the following reactions listed here proceed through the exact same sequence: Addition of nucleophile to the carbonyl carbon. Protonation of the oxygen. The reactions are the following: Grignard reaction Addition of organolithiums Reduction of aldehydes and ketones with NaBH4 and LiAlH4 Addition of (-)CN to give cyanohydrins This works for both aldehydes and ketones (even though just aldehydes are shown here). Apologies – big image. All we’re doing here is changing the identity of the nucleophile! It’s like having a formula, and all we’re doing is plugging a different nucleophile into the formula. Do you see how knowing the mechanisms here is going to make your life much easier? Because instead of having to keep track of 14 different reactions (7 different nucleophiles with aldehydes or ketones) you’re really just learning ONE reaction, with 7 different nucleophiles and two variants (aldehydes/ketones). Thanks for reading! James Organic Chemistry 2 builds on the concepts from Org 1 and introduces a lot of new reactions. Here is an Continue reading >>

Introducing Aldehydes And Ketones

Introducing Aldehydes And Ketones

This page explains what aldehydes and ketones are, and looks at the way their bonding affects their reactivity. It also considers their simple physical properties such as solubility and boiling points. Details of the chemical reactions of aldehydes and ketones are described on separate pages. What are aldehydes and ketones? Aldehydes and ketones as carbonyl compounds Aldehydes and ketones are simple compounds which contain a carbonyl group - a carbon-oxygen double bond. They are simple in the sense that they don't have other reactive groups like -OH or -Cl attached directly to the carbon atom in the carbonyl group - as you might find, for example, in carboxylic acids containing -COOH. Examples of aldehydes In aldehydes, the carbonyl group has a hydrogen atom attached to it together with either a second hydrogen atom or, more commonly, a hydrocarbon group which might be an alkyl group or one containing a benzene ring. For the purposes of this section, we shall ignore those containing benzene rings. Note: There is no very significant reason for this. It is just that if you are fairly new to organic chemistry you might not have come across any compounds with benzene rings in them yet. I'm just trying to avoid adding to your confusion! Notice that these all have exactly the same end to the molecule. All that differs is the complexity of the other group attached. When you are writing formulae for these, the aldehyde group (the carbonyl group with the hydrogen atom attached) is always written as -CHO - never as COH. That could easily be confused with an alcohol. Ethanal, for example, is written as CH3CHO; methanal as HCHO. The name counts the total number of carbon atoms in the longest chain - including the one in the carbonyl group. If you have side groups attached to the ch Continue reading >>

What Is The Glucose Ketone Index And Why Does It Matter?

What Is The Glucose Ketone Index And Why Does It Matter?

We’re all for using tools to improve our health and meet personal goals for our body. If you’ve never heard of or used the glucose ketone index (GKI), now’s the time to learn more about this useful tool. This article will fully explain what the glucose ketone index is and why it matters that we all use it. What is the Glucose Ketone Index? The glucose ketone index (GKI) is a single number that gives you a way to monitor the state of your metabolic health. Tracking your ketone levels lets you know how far you are into ketosis, and the GKI gives you a picture of the relationship between your ketone levels and your glucose levels. It’s simply an even more efficient way to see where you stand with your health. Let’s take a second to talk about what metabolic health means, as this needs to be clarified for two reasons: Many people who hear the term think of “metabolism,” which has been watered down a lot in recent times and is often misunderstood (such as the myth that intermittent fasting kills your metabolism, etc), and it’s not the same as an overall picture of metabolic health. Metabolic health has been defined in many different ways by researchers depending on what’s being measured: triglycerides, blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. Perhaps most commonly, we see it used in tandem with research on type 2 diabetes patients. This can get confusing if we’re not sure what type of metabolic health someone is referencing. Even experts haven’t completely agreed on a set definition of metabolic health, but the GKI index can help show the bigger picture. When we talk about metabolic health in the context of the GKI, we mean: the level of function in every cell of your body. This is important because proper cell function means everything is working in harmony ( Continue reading >>

1. Nomenclature Of Aldehydes And Ketones

1. Nomenclature Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Aldehydes and ketones are organic compounds which incorporate a carbonyl functional group, C=O. The carbon atom of this group has two remaining bonds that may be occupied by hydrogen or alkyl or aryl substituents. If at least one of these substituents is hydrogen, the compound is an aldehyde. If neither is hydrogen, the compound is a ketone. The IUPAC system of nomenclature assigns a characteristic suffix to these classes, al to aldehydes and one to ketones. For example, H2C=O is methanal, more commonly called formaldehyde. Since an aldehyde carbonyl group must always lie at the end of a carbon chain, it is by default position #1, and therefore defines the numbering direction. A ketone carbonyl function may be located anywhere within a chain or ring, and its position is given by a locator number. Chain numbering normally starts from the end nearest the carbonyl group. In cyclic ketones the carbonyl group is assigned position #1, and this number is not cited in the name, unless more than one carbonyl group is present. If you are uncertain about the IUPAC rules for nomenclature you should review them now. Examples of IUPAC names are provided (in blue) in the following diagram. Common names are in red, and derived names in black. In common names carbon atoms near the carbonyl group are often designated by Greek letters. The atom adjacent to the function is alpha, the next removed is beta and so on. Since ketones have two sets of neighboring atoms, one set is labeled α, β etc., and the other α', β' etc. Very simple ketones, such as propanone and phenylethanone (first two examples in the right column), do not require a locator number, since there is only one possible site for a ketone carbonyl function. Likewise, locator numbers are omitted for the simple dialdehyde at t Continue reading >>

Ketone

Ketone

Previous (Kermit Roosevelt, Jr.) Next (Key (music)) A ketone (pronounced as key tone) is either the functional group characterized by a carbonyl group (O=C) linked to two other carbon atoms or a chemical compound that contains this functional group. A ketone can be generally represented by the formula: A carbonyl carbon bonded to two carbon atoms distinguishes ketones from carboxylic acids, aldehydes, esters, amides, and other oxygen-containing compounds. The double-bond of the carbonyl group distinguishes ketones from alcohols and ethers. The simplest ketone is acetone (also called propanone). Mold Test Kits Easy to Use, Fast Results Available Interpretive Lab Report moldtesting.com The carbon atom adjacent to a carbonyl group is called the α-carbon. Hydrogens attached to this carbon are called α-hydrogens. In the presence of an acid catalyst the ketone is subjected to so-called keto-enol tautomerism. The reaction with a strong base gives the corresponding enolate. A diketone is a compound containing two ketone groups. Nomenclature In general, ketones are named using IUPAC nomenclature by changing the suffix -e of the parent alkane to -one. For common ketones, some traditional names such as acetone and benzophenone predominate, and these are considered retained IUPAC names,[1] although some introductory chemistry texts use names such as propanone. Oxo is the formal IUPAC nomenclature for a ketone functional group. However, other prefixes are also used by various books and journals. For some common chemicals (mainly in biochemistry), keto or oxy is the term used to describe the ketone (also known as alkanone) functional group. Oxo also refers to a single oxygen atom coordinated to a transition metal (a metal oxo). Physical properties A carbonyl group is polar. This ma Continue reading >>

What Is Ketone? - Definition, Structure, Formation & Formula

What Is Ketone? - Definition, Structure, Formation & Formula

Background of Ketone Did you know that our friend aldehyde has a very close relative named ketone? By definition, a ketone is an organic compound that contains a carbonyl functional group. So you may be wondering if aldehydes and ketones are relatives, what makes them different? Well, I am glad you asked because all you have to remember is this little guy: hydrogen. While aldehyde contains a hydrogen atom connected to its carbonyl group, ketone does not have a hydrogen atom attached. There are a few ways to know you are encountering a ketone. The first is by looking at the ending of the chemical word. If the suffix ending of the chemical name is '-one,' then you can be sure there is a ketone present in that compound. Want to know another way to tell if a ketone is lurking around the corner? By its physical property. Ketones have high boiling points and love water (high water solubility). Let's dig a little deeper with the physical property of a ketone. The oxygen in a ketone absolutely loves to take all the electrons it can get its hands on. But, by being an electron-hogger, oxygen's refusal to share creates a sticky situation where some atoms on the ketone have more or less charge than others. In chemistry, an electron-hogging atom is referred to as being electronegative. An electronegative atom is more attractive to other compounds. This attractiveness, called polarity, is what contributes to ketones' physical properties. Structure & Formula Ketones have a very distinct look to them; you can't miss it if you see them. As shown in Diagram 1, there are two R groups attached to the carbonyl group (C=O). Those R groups can be any type of compound that contains a carbon molecule. An example of how the R group determines ketone type is illustrated in this diagram here. The Continue reading >>

The Structure And Naming Of Aldehydes & Ketones

The Structure And Naming Of Aldehydes & Ketones

Doc Brown's GCE A Level AS A2 Chemistry Revising Advanced Level Organic Chemistry Revision Notes Part 5 CARBONYL COMPOUNDS NOMENCLATURE of ALDEHYDES and KETONES 5.1 The molecular structure and naming of ALDEHYDES and KETONES - including nomenclature of some isomers Nomenclature of aldehydes & ketones names and structures of aldehydes & ketones How to name aldehydes? How to name ketones? Nomenclature of substituted aldehydes or ketones - examples of acceptable names, displayed formula of aldehydes and ketones, graphic formula of aldehydes and ketones, molecular formula of aldehydes and ketones, skeletal formula of aldehydes and ketones, structural formula of aldehydes and ketones and homologous series of aldehydes and ketones, how to name the carbonyl group of compounds known as aldehydes and ketones Organic Chemistry Part 5 sub-index: 5.1.1 Nomenclature introduction * 5.1.2 Examples of aldehydes 5.1.3 Examples of ketones * 5.1.4 Other examples of substituted ketones 5.1.5 Oxidation sequence: alcohol ==> aldehyde/ketone ==> carboxylic acid Revision notes on the structure and naming-nomenclature of Aldehydes and Ketones 5.1.1 Introduction to Aldehyde and Ketone Nomenclature How do you name aldehydes? How do you name ketones? How do you name substituted aldehydes or ketones? Aldehydes and ketones are a group of compounds containing the carbonyl group, C=O. Aldehydes always have a hydrogen atom attached to the carbon of the carbonyl group, so the functional group is -CHO (see diagram above). The functional group is shown by using 'al' in the suffix part of the name e.g. methanal, ethanal, propanal etc. The prefix for the aldehyde name is based on the parent alkane minus the e. No number is required for the aldehyde group because the aldehyde group cannot be anything else ex Continue reading >>

Ketone

Ketone

Ketone, any of a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of a carbonyl group in which the carbon atom is covalently bonded to an oxygen atom. The remaining two bonds are to other carbon atoms or hydrocarbon radicals (R): Ketone compounds have important physiological properties. They are found in several sugars and in compounds for medicinal use, including natural and synthetic steroid hormones. Molecules of the anti-inflammatory agent cortisone contain three ketone groups. Only a small number of ketones are manufactured on a large scale in industry. They can be synthesized by a wide variety of methods, and because of their ease of preparation, relative stability, and high reactivity, they are nearly ideal chemical intermediates. Many complex organic compounds are synthesized using ketones as building blocks. They are most widely used as solvents, especially in industries manufacturing explosives, lacquers, paints, and textiles. Ketones are also used in tanning, as preservatives, and in hydraulic fluids. The most important ketone is acetone (CH3COCH3), a liquid with a sweetish odour. Acetone is one of the few organic compounds that is infinitely soluble in water (i.e., soluble in all proportions); it also dissolves many organic compounds. For this reason—and because of its low boiling point (56 °C [132.8 °F]), which makes it easy to remove by evaporation when no longer wanted—it is one of the most important industrial solvents, being used in such products as paints, varnishes, resins, coatings, and nail-polish removers. The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) name of a ketone is derived by selecting as the parent the longest chain of carbon atoms that contains the carbonyl group. The parent chain is numbered from the end that Continue reading >>

Ketone

Ketone

Not to be confused with ketone bodies. Ketone group Acetone In chemistry, a ketone (alkanone) /ˈkiːtoʊn/ is an organic compound with the structure RC(=O)R', where R and R' can be a variety of carbon-containing substituents. Ketones and aldehydes are simple compounds that contain a carbonyl group (a carbon-oxygen double bond). They are considered "simple" because they do not have reactive groups like −OH or −Cl attached directly to the carbon atom in the carbonyl group, as in carboxylic acids containing −COOH.[1] Many ketones are known and many are of great importance in industry and in biology. Examples include many sugars (ketoses) and the industrial solvent acetone, which is the smallest ketone. Nomenclature and etymology[edit] The word ketone is derived from Aketon, an old German word for acetone.[2][3] According to the rules of IUPAC nomenclature, ketones are named by changing the suffix -ane of the parent alkane to -anone. The position of the carbonyl group is usually denoted by a number. For the most important ketones, however, traditional nonsystematic names are still generally used, for example acetone and benzophenone. These nonsystematic names are considered retained IUPAC names,[4] although some introductory chemistry textbooks use systematic names such as "2-propanone" or "propan-2-one" for the simplest ketone (CH3−CO−CH3) instead of "acetone". The common names of ketones are obtained by writing separately the names of the two alkyl groups attached to the carbonyl group, followed by "ketone" as a separate word. The names of the alkyl groups are written alphabetically. When the two alkyl groups are the same, the prefix di- is added before the name of alkyl group. The positions of other groups are indicated by Greek letters, the α-carbon being th Continue reading >>

Natrogix Raspberry Ketone Ultra

Natrogix Raspberry Ketone Ultra

Raspberry Ketones became extremely famous after Dr. Oz called them “The #1 miracle in a bottle to burn your fat” on his hit TV show. But can we believe what we see on TV? There have been many studies that have been conducted that leans towards the positive effects of raspberry ketones being true. However, it is still too early to determine the long-term benefits of ingesting these types of supplements. These products are meant to increase weight loss, by speeding up a person’s metabolism, but in order for that to work, the manufacturers have to get the formula correct first. During our mission of testing all the raspberry ketone supplements in the market to find the best of the best, our only criteria was one thing…did I lose any weight from taking that supplement? We were actually surprised by how many products failed to give us any results, which made writing these reviews on the products that did work easy because there weren’t all that many. Natrogix Raspberry Ketone Ultra, was a part of the small minority of products that got me the results that I was looking for. So if you’re thinking about buying some supplements to help you lose weight, read carefully. Natrogix Raspberry Ketone Ultra is a all-natural supplement, made from pure red raspberries and is naturally infused with free radical fighting antioxidants that not only help improve vitality levels, but help improve mood, energy and a myriad of other benefits. Their formula was developed by a team of avid health professionals including doctors, physicians and sports nutritionists. All their products are manufactured in the USA, in a strictly regulated GMP facility. Natrogix is a well-established brand with over 20 other supplements already in the market. Their release of Raspberry Ketones is just ano Continue reading >>

Aldehydes And Ketones

Aldehydes And Ketones

KETONES Common Name “IUPAC” Name Condensed Structure or Molecular Formula Line Structure Comments methyl ethyl ketone 2-butanone CH3COCH2CH3 another major solvent diacetyl 2,3-butanedione CH3COCOCH3 synthetic butter flavor [“topping,” anyone?] cyclohexanone cyclohexanone C6H10O acetophenone methyl phenyl ketone mousy odor benzophenone diphenyl ketone fixative for heavy perfumes benzoin 2-hydroxy-1,2- diphenylethanone C14H12O2 starting material for syntheses jasmone 3-methyl-2- (cis-pent –2-en-1-yl) cyclopentanone C11H16O used in perfume muskone 3-methyl cyclopentadecanone C16H30O used in perfume civetone (Z)- 9- cycloheptadecene –1-one C17H30O used in perfume DOPA-quinone xxx C9H8NO4 intermediate in the biosynthesis of melanin l-carvone (-)-(R)-carvone C10H14O from spearmint oil d-carvone (+)-(S)-carvone C10H14O the mirror image of the above molecule; from caraway oil menthone xxxxx C10H18O peppermint odor; used in flavors & perfumes irone xxx C14H22O found in violets and iris; used in perfumes; there are several isomers, each with a characteristic odor ionone xxx C13H20O also found in violets and iris; used in perfume muskone civetone 4-methyl-3-hexanone 4-methyl-3-heptanone 6-methyl-3-octanone three alarm pheromones from different ant species. They are all the (S)-x-methyl derivatives of 3-alkanones © Ronald W. Rinehart, 2002Use “Back” button to return to Aldehydes & Ketones outline to see the table of aldehydes, click here Structures drawn with MDL ISISDraw® Continue reading >>

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