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What Is Ketogenic Therapy?

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

A ketogenic diet for dogs helps prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a recent trial published in the British Journal of Medicine. Of the 21 dogs in the trial, seven experienced a 50% reduction in seizure frequency, while three became seizure free, said study author Tsz Hong Law, of the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, United Kingdom. Less than one percent of dogs have epilepsy, yet it is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs. Should your pet switch to a ketogenic diet for dogs to treat his or her epilepsy? If your pup isn’t epileptic, why choose a ketogenic diet? If your pup is healthy, should you avoid a ketogenic diet for your dog? What is a Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets include a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates. The high fat content of the diet results in the conversion of fat to ketones – short-chain fats produced by the liver – which the body uses as energy in place of carbohydrates. Humans have treated epilepsy with ketogenic diets since the 1920s. However, it hasn’t been extensively studied in dogs. Why Choose a Ketogenic Diet? In addition to a potential reduction in seizures in epileptic dogs, ketogenic diets are also gaining popularity for cancer treatment. In 1924, Otto Warburg theorized cancer feeds on sugar, which is what carbohydrates become during digestion. However, cancer does not process fats well. As such, Warburg concluded patients could cut out sugars and carbs to slow cancer growth. KetoPet Sanctuary outside Austin, Texas utilizes the Warburg theory. The nonprofit sanctuary rescues dogs with terminal cancer. KetoPet claims to cure dog cancer with a combination of a ketogenic diet, metabolic conditioning (strenuous exercise), and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. However, their finding Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

What is the ketogenic diet? The "classic" ketogenic diet is a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy. It is prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. It is usually used in children with seizures that do not respond to medications. It is stricter than the modified Atkins diet, requiring careful measurements of calories, fluids, and proteins. Foods are weighed and measured. The name ketogenic means that it produces ketones in the body. (keto = ketone; genic = producing) Ketones are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Usually the body uses carbohydrates (such as sugar, bread, pasta) for its fuel. Because the ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates, fats become the primary fuel instead. The body can work very well on ketones (and fats). Ketones are not dangerous. They can be detected in the urine, blood, and breath. Ketones are one of the more likely mechanisms of action of the diet, with higher ketone levels often leading to improved seizure control. However, there are many other theories for why the diet will work. Who will it help? Doctors usually recommend the ketogenic diet for children whose seizures have not responded to several different seizure medicines. The classic diet is usually not recommended for adults, mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow. However, the modified Atkins diet does work well. This also should be done with a good team of adult neurologists and dietitians. The ketogenic diet has been shown in many studies to be particularly helpful for some epilepsy conditions. These include infantile spasms, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, and GLUT-1 deficiency. Using a formula-only Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is one treatment option for children with epilepsy whose seizures are not controlled with AEDs. The diet may help to reduce the number or severity of seizures and can often have positive effects on behaviour. Up to 70% of people with epilepsy could have their seizures controlled with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). For some children who continue to have seizures, the ketogenic diet may help. However, the diet is very specialised. It should be carried out with the care, supervision and guidance of trained medical specialists. What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet (KD) is a high fat, low carbohydrate, controlled protein diet that has been used since the 1920s for the treatment of epilepsy. The diet is a medical treatment and is usually only considered when at least two suitable medications have been tried and not worked. The ketogenic diet is an established treatment option for children with hard to control epilepsy. Some adults may benefit from dietary treatments, but more data is needed about the impact and results for adults, and adult treatments are currently only available in a few UK clinics. Dietary treatments for epilepsy must only be followed with the support of an experienced epilepsy specialist and dietitian (food specialist). How does the diet work? Usually the body uses glucose (a form of sugar) from carbohydrates (found in foods like sugar, bread or pasta) for its energy source. Chemicals called ketones are made when the body uses fat for energy (this is called ‘ketosis’). The body uses ketones instead of glucose for its energy source. Research in 2015 has shown that another chemical, decanoic acid, is also produced as a result of the diet. These chemicals help to reduce seizures for some people. Who is the diet suitable for? The Continue reading >>

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic diets have become incredibly popular. Early research suggests this high-fat, very low-carb diet may benefit several health conditions. Although some of the evidence is from case studies and animal research, results from human controlled studies are also promising. Here are 15 health conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet. Epilepsy is a disease that causes seizures due to excessive brain activity. Anti-seizure medications are effective for some people with epilepsy. However, others don't respond to the drugs or can't tolerate their side effects. Of all the conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet, epilepsy has by far the most evidence supporting it. In fact, there are several dozen studies on the topic. Research shows that seizures typically improve in about 50% of epilepsy patients who follow the classic ketogenic diet. This is also known as a 4:1 ketogenic diet because it provides 4 times as much fat as protein and carbs combined (1, 2, 3). The modified Atkins diet (MAD) is based on a considerably less restrictive 1:1 ratio of fat to protein and carbs. It has been shown to be equally effective for seizure control in most adults and children older than two years of age (4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The ketogenic diet may also have benefits on the brain beyond seizure control. For example, when researchers examined the brain activity of children with epilepsy, they found improvements in various brain patterns in 65% of those following a ketogenic diet — regardless of whether they had fewer seizures (9). Ketogenic diets have been shown to reduce seizure frequency and severity in many children and adults with epilepsy who don't respond well to drug therapy. Metabolic syndrome, sometimes referred to as prediabetes, is characterized by insulin resistance. Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

Pediatric Ketogenic Diet

Pediatric Ketogenic Diet

A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and very-low-carbohydrate diet which has been found to help many children whose seizures are not well-controlled by anti-seizure medications. In some children, the ketogenic diet is combined with standard anticonvulsant medications. While the actual mechanism of the ketogenic diet's effectiveness against seizures is unknown, many children on the diet are able to have their epilepsy medication dose lowered, decreasing unwanted medication side effects. We are consistently ranked among the top hospitals in U.S.News & World Report, distinguished for our pediatric care. Read More Because this is a medical treatment, the ketogenic diet must be supervised by a medical team, consisting of a neurologist and dietitian, who can anticipate and manage possible nutritional deficits or other medical side effects or complications. The team helps children and their families establish and maintain the diet, and learn how to incorporate the diet into daily living. Children on the ketogenic diet are seen several times throughout the year for close monitoring, while they continue to follow with their primary neurologist for potential medication changes. In addition, the team also implements the Modified Atkins Diet and Low-Glycemic Index Therapy, other dietary therapies for which there is increasing data about benefit in the treatment of difficult-to-treat epilepsy. Conditions treated by the Ketogenic Diet Team include: Epilepsy such as Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy and other epilepsies Glucose transporter type-1 deficiency Lennox Gastaut syndrome Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency Dravet syndrome What is a ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet is sometimes offered to children who continue to have seizures while on seizure medication. When medicati Continue reading >>

The Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

The Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

A therapeutic ketogenic diet can be helpful for a range of chronic health conditions such as cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Domonic D’Agostino is doing interesting research into the possible uses for ketosis, both through diet and supplementation. His initial funding was from the US Military to research the applications of ketosis for navy seal divers in order to avoid oxygen toxicity seizures. He has continued this research into how ketosis can starve cancer and be used in conjunction with normal treatments to aid recovery from chemotherapy and slow tumour growth. [1] His more recent research demonstrates that body builders can maximise their power to weight ratio and recovery using a ketogenic approach. Dr Mary Newport has received a lot of coverage after treating her husband’s advanced Alzheimer’s with coconut oil. [2] Terry Whals is undertaking clinical trials of her high nutrient density ketogenic diet that has worked to reverse her own multiple sclerosis.[3] The ketogenic diet for epilepsy has made a resurgence since director Jim Abrahams [4] found success with the ketogenic diet for his son Charlie and then made a movie of his experience. [5] The Charlie Foundation (with partner site ketocook.com) supports families working to use a ketogenic dietary approach to manage epileptic seizures. [6] Jimmy Moore’s Keto Clarity [7] spends three chapters profiling the various conditions that the ketogenic diet has been claimed to be beneficial for. Solid science (chapter 16) Epilepsy Diabetes mellitus Weight loss Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) GERD and heartburn Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) Good evidence (chapter 17) Alzheimer’s disease Parkinson’s disease Dementia Schizophrenia, bipolar and oth Continue reading >>

Hospital Guidance For Those On Ketogenic Therapy

Hospital Guidance For Those On Ketogenic Therapy

The ketogenic patient in hospital: How to support children and adults already established on the ketogenic diet presenting with incurrent illness or for elective procedures. ADMISSION On admission, the patient or their carers will be able to supply: Information about their specific ketogenic regime. Contact details for their ketogenic dietitian / hospital team. Blood glucose and ketone testing equipment (if they use this at home). If you are unable to obtain individual guidance, the following background basics may be of help. MONITORING If the patient is unwell, it is recommended that the following biochemical indices are checked: Full blood count, renal function, liver function, ammonia, bicarbonate, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, urinalysis, capillary blood gases. Please check weight on admission. Test urine for ketones each time passed. Check blood glucose and ketones 4 hourly if unwell or nil by mouth, otherwise please follow the individuals normal testing routine. BLOOD GLUCOSE and BLOOD KETONE LEVELS; when to take action? Ketogenic therapy tends to produce a very stable blood glucose profile at the mid/ low end of the normal range and patients may not show symptoms of hypoglycaemia at 2.5-3mmol/l. PLEASE TAKE ACTION IF: Blood glucose is 2.5mmol/l or below. Treat with 5g Maxijul* dissolved in either 30-50ml water or sugar free squash orally or via PEG, and retest the blood glucose in 15 minutes. Repeat as required. Patient is symptomatic of low blood glucose: Sweating Clammy Excessive Vomiting Increased sleepiness or confusion Fast Heart Rate Fast Breathing Blood ketones are 6mmol/l or above. Treat with 5g Maxijul* dissolved in either 30-50ml water or sugar free squash orally or via PEG, and retest the blood ketones in 30 minutes. Repeat as required. Patient is sym Continue reading >>

Enteral Feeding Of Ketogenic Therapy

Enteral Feeding Of Ketogenic Therapy

Use of an enteral feeding tube to provide all or part of a prescribed ketogenic therapy is indicated in situations where oral intake is not possible due to medical conditions. It may also be used to supplement an inadequate oral intake resulting from physical or behavioural eating problems. A ketogenic enteral feed can be used for existing tube fed patients who are to be initiated on ketogenic therapy, or for patients already established on ketogenic therapy who subsequently require tube feeding. The most common feeding route is directly to the stomach via a naso-gastric tube (short term use only) or a gastrostomy, through the abdominal wall (for longer term use), however it is also possible to feed directly into the duodenum or jejunum. Prior to commencement of enteral feeding a full nutritional evaluation must be carried out by the dietitian; this will include assessment of current and past growth, current nutritional intake and route of feeding, bowel function, scope for inclusion of oral feeds and whether swallow has been adequately assessed by a speech and language therapist, and review of baseline ketogenic blood biochemistry results. Consideration of nutritional requirements will then enable the dietitian to calculate and advise on an appropriate ketogenic feeding regime. At present there is one complete product available for ketogenic enteral feeding regimes. Ketocal (Nutricia) is available as a 4:1 or 3:1 ratio powder, or as a 4:1 ratio liquid. These formulations are based on the ratio system used in the classical ketogenic diet (fat: carbohydrate and protein) and are designed for use in children over 1 year. There are no ketogenic formulae designed for older children and adults available currently. The formulae readily require adjustment of the protein, fat or Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet (or keto diet) has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvement. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) for energy to dietary fat and, critically, your own body fat after the stage of “ketosis” is reached. Meanwhile, beyond its outstanding potential to help people lose weight and burn off fat stores, research shows that the ketogenic diet helps to fight serious diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer’s. Table of Contents 1. What Is the Keto Diet? What Is Ketosis? How to Get Into Ketosis What Are the Stages of Ketosis? Does the Keto Diet Work for Women? 2. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet 3. What Is the Ketogenic Diet Plan? 5. Keto Side Effects and the Keto Flu What Is the Keto Diet? The ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet plan that was originally designed in the 1920s for patients with epilepsy by researchers working at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. (1) Researchers found that fasting — avoiding consumption of all foods for a brief period of time, including those that provide carbohydrates — helped reduce the amount of seizures patients suffered, in addition to having other positive effects on body fat, blood sugar, cholesterol and hunger levels. (4) Unfortunately, long-term fasting is not a feasible op Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet has been in existence for 90 years The ketogenic diet was designed in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic. Despite being highly effective in treating epilepsy, it fell out of fashion due to the surge in new anti-seizure medications in the 1940s. In 1994 Charlie Abraham’s family started The Charlie Foundation after his complete recovery from daily seizures despite trying all available anti-seizure medications and enduring a futile brain surgery. Charlie started the diet as a toddler and remained on it for 5 years. He is now a college student and remains seizure-free. Ketosis is the unique feature The diet is high in fat, supplies adequate protein and is low in carbohydrates. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. The Charlie Foundation is a global leader in promoting ketogenic therapies In 2006, The Charlie Foundation commissioned a panel comprised of neurologists and dietitians with particular expertise in using the ketogenic diet to create a consensus statement in support of the clinical management of the ketogenic diet and when it should be considered. Children are especially good candidates for the diet owing to their reliance on adults for nourishment and to the nature of a young developing brain. Comparison of diet therapies There are five levels of diet which have been published in medical literture as effective treatments for epilepsy: the classic ketogenic diet, the modified ketogenic diet, medium-chain triglyceride (MC Continue reading >>

6th Global Symposium On Ketogenic Therapies For Neurological Disorders:

6th Global Symposium On Ketogenic Therapies For Neurological Disorders:

Embracing Diversity, Global Implementation and Individualized Care International Convention Center Jeju in Seogwipo, Jeju, Korea 5 - 9 October 2018 We are pleased to inform you that 6th Global Symposium on KETOGENIC THERAPIES FOR NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS (KETO 2018) will be held in Jeju, Korea from October 5- 9, 2018. Held in the Asian-Oceanian region for the first time, the symposium aims to contribute to improving the lives of people with neurological disorders and exchange scientific and clinical accomplishments under the theme of “Embracing Diversity, Global Implementation and Individualized Care". The 6th Global Symposium on Ketogenic Therapies welcomes research scientists, pediatric and adult neurologists, epileptologists, nurses, dietitians, other allied health professionals, and trainees from every related field, with the fundamental goal of sharing up-to-date information on this rapidly expanding area of inquiry and high translational significance. To achieve such goal, scientific programs will focus on promoting collaborative research into the underlying mechanisms of metabolism-based therapies, facilitating new collaborative clinical work and clinical applications, and defining important clinical and research questions that should be pursued in the future. In addition to cutting-edge keynote and topical presentations, the symposium will include both practical workshops and rapid-fire research reviews by leading scientists. The Organizing Committee is devoting its utmost efforts to prepare a most meaningful and enjoyable symposium, and I strongly believe that KETO 2018 will bring together hundreds of medical professionals, scientists, trainees and industry to discuss the latest advances of ketogenic therapy research and innovations. Continue reading >>

Your Brain On Ketones

Your Brain On Ketones

The modern prescription of high carbohydrate, low fat diets and eating snacks between meals has coincided with an increase in obesity, diabetes, and and increase in the incidence of many mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. In addition, many of these disorders are striking the population at younger ages. While most people would agree that diet has a lot to do with the development of obesity and diabetes, many would disagree that what we eat has much to do with our mental health and outlook. I believe that what we eat has a lot to do with the health of our brains, though of course mental illness (like physical illness) has multifactorial causes, and by no means should we diminish the importance of addressing all the causes in each individual. But let's examine the opposite of the modern high carbohydrate, low fat, constant snacking lifestyle and how that might affect the brain. The opposite of a low fat, snacking lifestyle would be the lifestyle our ancestors lived for tens of thousands of generations, the lifestyle for which our brains are primarily evolved. It seems reasonable that we would have had extended periods without food, either because there was none available, or we were busy doing something else. Then we would follow that period with a filling meal of gathered plant and animal products, preferentially selecting the fat. During the day we might have eaten a piece of fruit, or greens, or a grub we dug up, but anything filling or high in calories (such as a starchy tuber) would have to be killed, butchered, and/or carefully prepared before eating. Fortunately, we have a terrific system of fuel for periods of fasting or low carbohydrate eating, our body (and brain) can readily shift from burning glucose to burning what ar Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet For Epilepsy?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet For Epilepsy?

Could the solution to your child's epilepsy be a diet loaded with butter, cream, oils, and mayo? It might sound weird -- and maybe not so appetizing -- but the ketogenic diet is real. And in many kids, it works. But the super high-fat, super low-carb ketogenic diet is not for everyone. It's strict and complicated. And it's not really "healthy" in the normal sense. If you're considering it, you need to think through how it affects your child's life -- and the impact on the whole family. The ketogenic diet has been curbing seizures since it was first developed in the 1920s. About half of kids who follow it have a big drop in how many they get. As many as 1 in 7 stop having seizures completely. The diet helps with many types of epilepsy, but works especially well with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome), and others. It can also help people of any age, but it's mostly used in babies and children. That's mainly because teens and adults have so much trouble sticking to it. Because the ketogenic diet is so demanding, doctors usually only recommend it if a child has already tried two or three medications and they haven't worked. When the diet works, kids can often lower their medication doses or stop taking them. What's more, most kids who stay on the ketogenic diet for at least 2 years have a good chance of becoming seizure free -- even after they go back to eating normally. Your child's diet will have a lot of fat. To put it in perspective, in a healthy diet for kids, about 25% to 40% of calories come from fat. In the ketogenic diet, about 80% to 90% of calories come from fat. So your child's meals are loaded with fats while portions of protein and especially carbs are small. In the typical ketogenic diet, kids get three to four times as much Continue reading >>

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