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What Is Ketogenic Therapy?

Dr. Gonzalez Dismantles The Ketogenic Diet For Cancer [13 Mins.]

Dr. Gonzalez Dismantles The Ketogenic Diet For Cancer [13 Mins.]

In early 2012, I started to see some chatter online about the ketogenic diet as a potential anti-cancer diet. I’ve understood for many years that different diets work for different people, and I was intrigued by the ketogenic diet for cancer. Could this be another possible dietary strategy to heal cancer? So naturally I shared information about it on this site, thinking it might be a viable option for some. At that time there were no other sites (at least none as large as this one) talking about the ketogenic diet and how it may help cancer patients. In 2013, awareness of the keto diet exploded. This was mostly due to Dr. Mercola’s articles, interviews, and endorsement. Since then, many others have jumped on the bandwagon. And at first glance, there is a compelling hypothesis which presents the ketogenic diet as a method to starve cancer cells of their primary fuel, glucose, thus killing the cancer. Despite the zealous promoters of it, some of whom I have great respect for, my opinion of the ketogenic diet has changed. What caused my change of heart in promoting the ketogenic diet for cancer patients? It started with several long phone conversations and email exchanges I had with cancer healing expert friend who was adamant that the ketogenic diet did not work in healing cancer long term. This coincided with the recurrence of cancer in someone I knew who was promoting the ketogenic diet (as effective). It appeared to have some positive short term results for some people (shrinking or slowing down tumors), but I was beginning to have some doubts about it working long term. This uneasiness persisted for many months and I could not shake it. So I finally made the decision to take down my very popular post and youtube video about it. Then came the coup de grace from Dr. Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

What Are Ketogenic Diets? Can They Treat Epilepsy And Brain Cancer?

What Are Ketogenic Diets? Can They Treat Epilepsy And Brain Cancer?

Ketogenic diets are back in the news with claims they are a “cure-all”. Research shows that in epilepsy not controlled by current treatment, around 50% of children and adults following ketogenic diets have a reduction in seizures. For brain cancer, most research has been in animals. A number of human trials are underway testing safety, tolerance, interactions with other treatments, side-effects and the impact on cancer progression, quality of life and survival. So what are ketones? Although the main source of energy for the body is usually carbohydrate, which gets converted to blood glucose during digestion and metabolism, the body can also burn fat for energy. Ketone bodies, or ketones for short, are molecules produced by the liver when fat is metabolised. Ketones are used as the fuel source to produce energy for the body when glucose is not available. The three ketone bodies resulting from fat metabolism are acetoacetate, β-Hydroxybutyrate and acetone. Acetoacetate spontaneously converts to acetone, which is easily vaporised. Acetone crosses lung membranes and gets expired on your breath. That’s why people who are ketotic, meaning ketones are their primary fuel source, often have a “nail polish” odour. As blood levels of ketones rise, acetoacetate and β-Hydroxybutyrate cross the blood-brain barrier to become the main source of fuel for the brain. Ketones also appear in urine. Their presence is tested for using “keto” strips that change colour from buff to pink to maroon, depending on the concentration. It’s thought the metabolic changes associated with being “ketotic”, in combination with lower blood levels of glucose, are the important issues in epilepsy and cancer. What is a ketogenic diet? Ketogenic diets should only be used as part of medical Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet For Epilepsy?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet For Epilepsy?

Could the solution to your child's epilepsy be a diet loaded with butter, cream, oils, and mayo? It might sound weird -- and maybe not so appetizing -- but the ketogenic diet is real. And in many kids, it works. But the super high-fat, super low-carb ketogenic diet is not for everyone. It's strict and complicated. And it's not really "healthy" in the normal sense. If you're considering it, you need to think through how it affects your child's life -- and the impact on the whole family. The ketogenic diet has been curbing seizures since it was first developed in the 1920s. About half of kids who follow it have a big drop in how many they get. As many as 1 in 7 stop having seizures completely. The diet helps with many types of epilepsy, but works especially well with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome), and others. It can also help people of any age, but it's mostly used in babies and children. That's mainly because teens and adults have so much trouble sticking to it. Because the ketogenic diet is so demanding, doctors usually only recommend it if a child has already tried two or three medications and they haven't worked. When the diet works, kids can often lower their medication doses or stop taking them. What's more, most kids who stay on the ketogenic diet for at least 2 years have a good chance of becoming seizure free -- even after they go back to eating normally. Your child's diet will have a lot of fat. To put it in perspective, in a healthy diet for kids, about 25% to 40% of calories come from fat. In the ketogenic diet, about 80% to 90% of calories come from fat. So your child's meals are loaded with fats while portions of protein and especially carbs are small. In the typical ketogenic diet, kids get three to four times as much Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is one treatment option for children with epilepsy whose seizures are not controlled with AEDs. The diet may help to reduce the number or severity of seizures and can often have positive effects on behaviour. Up to 70% of people with epilepsy could have their seizures controlled with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). For some children who continue to have seizures, the ketogenic diet may help. However, the diet is very specialised. It should be carried out with the care, supervision and guidance of trained medical specialists. What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet (KD) is a high fat, low carbohydrate, controlled protein diet that has been used since the 1920s for the treatment of epilepsy. The diet is a medical treatment and is usually only considered when at least two suitable medications have been tried and not worked. The ketogenic diet is an established treatment option for children with hard to control epilepsy. Some adults may benefit from dietary treatments, but more data is needed about the impact and results for adults, and adult treatments are currently only available in a few UK clinics. Dietary treatments for epilepsy must only be followed with the support of an experienced epilepsy specialist and dietitian (food specialist). How does the diet work? Usually the body uses glucose (a form of sugar) from carbohydrates (found in foods like sugar, bread or pasta) for its energy source. Chemicals called ketones are made when the body uses fat for energy (this is called ‘ketosis’). The body uses ketones instead of glucose for its energy source. Research in 2015 has shown that another chemical, decanoic acid, is also produced as a result of the diet. These chemicals help to reduce seizures for some people. Who is the diet suitable for? The Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of A Ketogenic Diet And Its Role In Cancer Treatment

The Benefits Of A Ketogenic Diet And Its Role In Cancer Treatment

A ketogenic diet, which calls for minimizing carbohydrates and replacing them with healthy fats and moderate amounts of high-quality protein, can offer hope against cancer, both for prevention and treatment Your normal cells have the metabolic flexibility to adapt from using glucose to using ketone bodies. Cancer cells lack this ability so when you reduce carbs to only non-starchy vegetables, you effectively starve the cancer Cancer can be more accurately classified as a mitochondrial metabolic disease. Few people inherit genes that predispose them to cancer (most inherit genes that prevent cancer), and inherited mutations typically disrupt the function of the mitochondria The mitochondria—the main power generators in your cells—are believed to be the central point in the origins of many cancers. Your mitochondria can be damaged not only by inherited mutations, but also by a wide variety of environmental factors and toxins Fasting has remarkable health benefits and strengthens your mitochondria network systems throughout your body. As long as your mitochondria remain healthy and functional, it’s very unlikely that cancer will develop By Dr. Mercola Could a ketogenic diet eventually be a "standard of care" drug-free treatment for cancer? Personally, I believe it's absolutely crucial, for whatever type of cancer you're trying to address, and hopefully some day it will be adopted as a first line of treatment. A ketogenic diet calls for eliminating all but non-starchy vegetable carbohydrates, and replacing them with healthy fats and high-quality protein. The premise is that since cancer cells need glucose to thrive, and carbohydrates turn into glucose in your body, then lowering the glucose level in your blood though carb and protein restriction literally starves the Continue reading >>

Prescribing Dietary Fat: Therapeutic Uses Of Ketogenic Diets

Prescribing Dietary Fat: Therapeutic Uses Of Ketogenic Diets

February 2016 The high-fat, adequate-protein, and very-low-carbohydrate way of eating known as the ketogenic diet (KD) has been used to treat epilepsy for almost 100 years. The therapeutic effects of KDs have been investigated in a number of diseases and disorders, including diabetes, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. This article provides an overview of where the research stands. One of the victims of the war against dietary fat has been the ketogenic (ketone-producing) diet. This high-fat, adequate-protein, and very-low-carbohydrate way of eating has been known for more than 100 years as an effective treatment for a number of disorders. William Banting published a monograph in 1863 titled Letter on Corpulence, which detailed the successful treatment of his own obesity with a low-carbohydrate diet. Severe childhood epilepsy has been treated since the 1920s with the ketogenic diet (KD), and some type 2 diabetics have achieved normal blood glucose levels without medication by following a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. Despite an abundant anecdotal and scientific history, many modern-day physicians-often underschooled in nutrition and over-reliant on pharmacotherapy-have written off KDs as being unsustainable and unsafe, thanks in large part to the demonization of dietary fat. Now, however, after a significant increase in research on KDs and a shift in opinion regarding dietary fat, ketogenic diets are experiencing a comeback. A recent review article co-written by Jeffrey S. Volek neatly summarizes a number of the conditions in which KDs appear to play a therapeutic role. These include a wide variety of neurological conditions such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and certain c Continue reading >>

The Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

The Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

A therapeutic ketogenic diet can be helpful for a range of chronic health conditions such as cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Domonic D’Agostino is doing interesting research into the possible uses for ketosis, both through diet and supplementation. His initial funding was from the US Military to research the applications of ketosis for navy seal divers in order to avoid oxygen toxicity seizures. He has continued this research into how ketosis can starve cancer and be used in conjunction with normal treatments to aid recovery from chemotherapy and slow tumour growth. [1] His more recent research demonstrates that body builders can maximise their power to weight ratio and recovery using a ketogenic approach. Dr Mary Newport has received a lot of coverage after treating her husband’s advanced Alzheimer’s with coconut oil. [2] Terry Whals is undertaking clinical trials of her high nutrient density ketogenic diet that has worked to reverse her own multiple sclerosis.[3] The ketogenic diet for epilepsy has made a resurgence since director Jim Abrahams [4] found success with the ketogenic diet for his son Charlie and then made a movie of his experience. [5] The Charlie Foundation (with partner site ketocook.com) supports families working to use a ketogenic dietary approach to manage epileptic seizures. [6] Jimmy Moore’s Keto Clarity [7] spends three chapters profiling the various conditions that the ketogenic diet has been claimed to be beneficial for. Solid science (chapter 16) Epilepsy Diabetes mellitus Weight loss Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) GERD and heartburn Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) Good evidence (chapter 17) Alzheimer’s disease Parkinson’s disease Dementia Schizophrenia, bipolar and oth Continue reading >>

6th Global Symposium On Ketogenic Therapies For Neurological Disorders:

6th Global Symposium On Ketogenic Therapies For Neurological Disorders:

Embracing Diversity, Global Implementation and Individualized Care International Convention Center Jeju in Seogwipo, Jeju, Korea 5 - 9 October 2018 We are pleased to inform you that 6th Global Symposium on KETOGENIC THERAPIES FOR NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS (KETO 2018) will be held in Jeju, Korea from October 5- 9, 2018. Held in the Asian-Oceanian region for the first time, the symposium aims to contribute to improving the lives of people with neurological disorders and exchange scientific and clinical accomplishments under the theme of “Embracing Diversity, Global Implementation and Individualized Care". The 6th Global Symposium on Ketogenic Therapies welcomes research scientists, pediatric and adult neurologists, epileptologists, nurses, dietitians, other allied health professionals, and trainees from every related field, with the fundamental goal of sharing up-to-date information on this rapidly expanding area of inquiry and high translational significance. To achieve such goal, scientific programs will focus on promoting collaborative research into the underlying mechanisms of metabolism-based therapies, facilitating new collaborative clinical work and clinical applications, and defining important clinical and research questions that should be pursued in the future. In addition to cutting-edge keynote and topical presentations, the symposium will include both practical workshops and rapid-fire research reviews by leading scientists. The Organizing Committee is devoting its utmost efforts to prepare a most meaningful and enjoyable symposium, and I strongly believe that KETO 2018 will bring together hundreds of medical professionals, scientists, trainees and industry to discuss the latest advances of ketogenic therapy research and innovations. Continue reading >>

Epilepsy Center | Ketogenic Diet

Epilepsy Center | Ketogenic Diet

Diet therapy for epilepsy Diet therapy can sometimes be a good alternative for childhood epilepsy when medications cannot control seizures or have intolerable side effects. While diet therapy is often worth trying in general, it can be especially helpful for certain epilepsy syndromes, such as myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome). There are now a number of different diets that can be used for epilepsy: the Classic Ketogenic Diet, the Modified Atkins Diet, the Medium Chain Triglyceride Diet and the Low Glycemic Index Treatment Diet. The choice is made after the initial consultation, and depends on the epilepsy diagnosis, the child’s age and feeding habits, and family needs and preferences. Ketogenic diets are the treatment of choice for glucose transporter deficiency (GLUT1DS) and should be considered in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH) and other mitochondrial disorders, even when these disorders do not cause seizures. Diet therapy takes care and dedication, but it may offer children a better chance of seizure control than trying a new anticonvulsant drug. Unfortunately, we don’t yet have good predictors of whether a child will respond to diet therapy, so we usually recommend a trial of three to four months. About the ketogenic diet Known for more than a century, the ketogenic diet has recently come back into use for epilepsy and has been shown to be effective for many children when drugs fail. It can provide control of seizures for about 30 percent of children with epilepsy. In its strictest form, the ketogenic diet provides more than 90 percent of its calories through fat (as compared to the 25 to 40 percent usually recommended for children). When we burn fat for energy, rather than glucose from carbohydrates, we produce compounds known as ketone bodi Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Therapy Effects On Electrical And Metabolic Abnormalities In Epilepsy

Ketogenic Therapy Effects On Electrical And Metabolic Abnormalities In Epilepsy

Approximately a fourth of children with seizures do not respond adequately to available therapy. Ketogenic therapy has a long history as treatment for intractable epilepsy, but there is no agreement concerning how it works and what is the best way to administer it. This natural history study will collect data pertaining to both questions. The basis of Ketogenic Therapy is an altered macronutrient intake. It is based on a ratio of fat: protein+carbohydrate in which protein intake is adequate and carbohydrate is minimal. On Ketogenic Therapy, the body metabolizes fat, producing ketones as an energy source for the brain. Induction of ketosis has been shown to correlate with the reduction of seizures observed with Ketogenic Therapy. A major challenge of Ketogenic Therapy in children is that the compounds provided to stop seizure activity are the same compounds provided for growth and development. The altered macronutrient ratio that is the basis of Ketogenic Therapy is also a potential risk factor for dyslipidemia and may adversely affect growth. The investigators will evaluate efficacy of Ketogenic Therapy by assessing seizures and requirements for antiepileptic drugs. The investigators will evaluate adverse effects of Ketogenic Therapy by assessing dyslipidemia and growth. The investigators will foster optimal daily administration of therapy with structured training programs for caregivers. Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 200 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Ketogenic Therapy Effects on Electrical and Metabolic Abnormalities in Epilepsy Study Start Date : September 2006 Estimated Primary Completion Date : September 2018 Estimated Study Completi Continue reading >>

Therapeutic Ketogenic Diets: Evidence From The Experts

Therapeutic Ketogenic Diets: Evidence From The Experts

What names come to mind when you hear the term "Ketogenic Diet Expert"? For me, that list includes researchers Steve Phinney, PhD, Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, Thomas Seyfried, PhD, Adrienne Scheck, MD, Eugene Fine, MD, Dominic D'agostino, PhD, and Colin Champ, MD. There are many others who've conducted studies on ketogenic diets or use them in practice and understand their benefits -- and limitations -- for metabolic and therapeutic purposes. Although I understand the science, have read much of the work of the people listed above, and have worked with several clients who choose to follow a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet, at this point I wouldn't consider myself an expert in this area. In fact, I've spent the last year or so clarifying that my own approach to diabetes and weight management is low carb but not necessarily ketogenic. I make this distinction because I believe a very-high-fat ketogenic diet isn't necessary and in some cases can be counterproductive for weight loss and blood glucose control if energy/calorie intake from fat is too high. I find that a diet moderately high in protein and fat with limited carbohydrates (25-70 grams digestible or "net" carbs per day, depending on the person) works best for most. It's also the type of diet I've followed for several years, with great results. "The More Fat You Eat, The More Fat You'll Lose"? Now, a ketogenic diet containing less than 20 grams of net carb daily can produce weight loss provided energy intake is reduced, which often occurs spontaneously with carb restriction. There's no denying that many people experience dramatic weight loss with minimal carb intake, are able to maintain the loss, and feel great eating this way. But some of the statements I've read about keto being a miracle for dropping unwanted poun Continue reading >>

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Introduction Numerous dietary components and supplements have been evaluated as possible cancer prevention agents; however, until recently few studies have investigated diet as a possible adjuvant to cancer treatment. One of the most prominent and universal metabolic alterations seen in cancer cells is an increase in the rate of glycolytic metabolism even in the presence of oxygen [1]. Although increased glucose uptake by tumor cells was thought to support increased cancer cell proliferation and energy demands, recent studies suggest that increased tumor cell glycolytic metabolism may represent an adaptive response to escape metabolic oxidative stress caused by altered mitochondrial oxygen metabolism [2–4]. These data support the hypothesis that cancer cells are reliant on increased glucose consumption to maintain redox homeostasis due to increased one electron reductions of O2 to form O2•− and H2O2 in mitochondria. This divergence from normal cell metabolism has sparked a growing interest in targeting mitochondrial oxygen metabolism as a means of selectively sensitizing cancer cells to therapy [5–17]. In this regard, dietary modifications, such as high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets that enhance mitochondrial oxidative metabolism while limiting glucose consumption could represent a safe, inexpensive, easily implementable, and effective approach to selectively enhance metabolic stress in cancer cells versus normal cells. What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet consists of high fat, with moderate to low protein content, and very low carbohydrates, which forces the body to burn fat instead of glucose for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Generally, the ratio by weight is 3:1 or 4:1 fat to carbohydrate+protein, yielding a diet that has an energy dis Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet (or keto diet) has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvement. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) for energy to dietary fat and, critically, your own body fat after the stage of “ketosis” is reached. Meanwhile, beyond its outstanding potential to help people lose weight and burn off fat stores, research shows that the ketogenic diet helps to fight serious diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer’s. Table of Contents 1. What Is the Keto Diet? What Is Ketosis? How to Get Into Ketosis What Are the Stages of Ketosis? Does the Keto Diet Work for Women? 2. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet 3. What Is the Ketogenic Diet Plan? 5. Keto Side Effects and the Keto Flu What Is the Keto Diet? The ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet plan that was originally designed in the 1920s for patients with epilepsy by researchers working at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. (1) Researchers found that fasting — avoiding consumption of all foods for a brief period of time, including those that provide carbohydrates — helped reduce the amount of seizures patients suffered, in addition to having other positive effects on body fat, blood sugar, cholesterol and hunger levels. (4) Unfortunately, long-term fasting is not a feasible op Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet has been in existence for 90 years The ketogenic diet was designed in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic. Despite being highly effective in treating epilepsy, it fell out of fashion due to the surge in new anti-seizure medications in the 1940s. In 1994 Charlie Abraham’s family started The Charlie Foundation after his complete recovery from daily seizures despite trying all available anti-seizure medications and enduring a futile brain surgery. Charlie started the diet as a toddler and remained on it for 5 years. He is now a college student and remains seizure-free. Ketosis is the unique feature The diet is high in fat, supplies adequate protein and is low in carbohydrates. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. The Charlie Foundation is a global leader in promoting ketogenic therapies In 2006, The Charlie Foundation commissioned a panel comprised of neurologists and dietitians with particular expertise in using the ketogenic diet to create a consensus statement in support of the clinical management of the ketogenic diet and when it should be considered. Children are especially good candidates for the diet owing to their reliance on adults for nourishment and to the nature of a young developing brain. Comparison of diet therapies There are five levels of diet which have been published in medical literture as effective treatments for epilepsy: the classic ketogenic diet, the modified ketogenic diet, medium-chain triglyceride (MC Continue reading >>

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