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What Is Ketoacidosis Wiki

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous complication of diabetes mellitus in which the chemical balance of the body becomes far too acidic. Description Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) always results from a severe insulin deficiency. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the body to lower the blood sugar levels when they become too high. Diabetes mellitus is the disease resulting from the inability of the body to produce or respond properly to insulin, required by the body to convert glucose to energy. In childhood diabetes, DKA complications represent the leading cause of death, mostly due to the accumulation of abnormally large amounts of fluid in the brain (cerebral edema). DKA combines three major features: hyperglycemia, meaning excessively high blood sugar kevels; hyperketonemia, meaning an overproduction of ketones by the body; and acidosis, meaning that the blood has become too acidic. Insulin deficiency is responsible for all three conditions: the body glucose goes largely unused since most cells are unable to transport glucose into the cell without the presence of insulin; this condition makes the body use stored fat as an alternative source instead of the unavailable glucose for energy, a process that produces acidic ketones, which build up because they require insulin to be broken down. The presence of excess ketones in the bloodstream in turn causes the blood to become more acidic than the body tissues, which creates a toxic condition. Causes and symptoms DKA is most commonly seen in individuals with type I diabetes, under 19 years of age and is usually caused by the interruption of their insulin treatment or by acute infection or trauma. A small number of people with type II diabetes also experience ketoacidosis, but this is rare give Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Talk:diabetic Ketoacidosis

Talk:diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it. August 4, 2009 Good article nominee Listed Ideal sources for Wikipedia's health content are defined in the guideline Wikipedia:Identifying reliable sources (medicine) and are typically review articles. Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Diabetic ketoacidosis. PubMed provides review articles from the past five years (limit to free review articles or to systematic reviews) The TRIP database provides clinical publications about evidence-based medicine. Other potential sources include: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and CDC WikiProject Medicine [hide](Rated GA-class, Mid-importance) This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine. GA This article has been rated as GA-Class on the project's quality scale. Mid This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale. Comment[edit] The section "Ketone body production" is very poor; it needs rewritten. Ketones needn't be desribed as "fuel for the brain" - they are used in the production of acetyl-CoA. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dermotmallon (talk • contribs) 10:54, 10 June 2008 (UTC) more re ketone bodies[edit] The mechanism section does not clearly explain the pathophysiology of DKA. I am not an expert, but I believe the release of acidifying ketone bod Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency that can happen in people with diabetes mellitus. DKA happens mostly in people with Type 1 diabetes, although it may happen in some people that have Type 2 diabetes. DKA happens when a person does not have enough insulin in their body. All of the cells in the body need glucose (sugar) to survive, because the body needs sugar to make energy. Insulin breaks down glucose into a form that the body can use for energy. Without insulin, sugar stays in the blood and cannot get into the cells. This causes high blood sugar levels and makes it impossible for the cells to use glucose to make energy. DKA can be caused by not having enough insulin, eating too many carbohydrates, and sometimes physical or mental stress. DKA can also be a sign that a person has diabetes that has not been discovered, or is not being controlled well. DKA is diagnosed through blood and urine testing. These tests will show high blood sugar, which does not happen with other forms of ketoacidosis. DKA was first discovered around 1886. Before insulin therapy was first used in the 1920s, DKA almost always caused death. The "3 polys" of DKA: Polydipsia (feeling very thirsty; this is caused by dehydration) Polyphagia (feeling very hungry; the brain realizes the body's cells are not getting enough sugar and triggers hunger, because normally eating would give the cells the sugar they need) Polyuria (urinating a lot; this is the body's way of trying to get rid of the extra glucose in the bloodstream) A "fruity" smell on the breath (acetone breath, caused by the body trying to blow off the acids and waste products created by DKA) Abdominal pain As DKA gets worse, it can cause these symptoms:[2] Confusion, which becomes worse and worse (because the brain is not getti Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Seen in patients with recent history of binge drinking with little/no nutritional intake Anion gap metabolic acidosis associated with acute cessation of ETOH consumption after chronic abuse Characterized by high serum ketone levels and an elevated AG Consider other causes of elevated AG, as well as co-ingestants Concomitant metabolic alkalosis can occur from dehydration (volume depletion) and emesis Ethanol metabolism depletes NAD stores[1] Results in inhibition of Krebs cycle, depletion of glycogen stores, and ketone formation High NADH:NAD also results in increased lactate production Acetoacetate is metabolized to acetone so elevated osmolal gap may also be seen Differential Diagnosis Starvation Ketosis Binge drinking ending in nausea, vomiting, and decreased intake Positive serum ketones Wide anion gap metabolic acidosis without alternate explanation Urine ketones may be falsely negative or low Lab measured ketone is acetoacetate May miss beta-hydroxybutyrate Consider associated diseases (ie pancreatitis, rhabdomyolysis, hepatitis, infections) Oral nutrition if able to tolerate Consider bicarb if life-threatening acidosis (pH <7.1) unresponsive to fluid therapy Discharge home after treatment if able to tolerate POs and acidosis resolved Consider admission for those with severe volume depletion and/or acidosis Hypoglycemia is poor prognostic feature, indicating depleted glycogen stores See Also Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Also see Pet Diabetes Wiki: Ketoacidosis A Ketone Primer by an FDMB user What are Ketones? Ketones or ketone bodies (acetone, acetoacetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) are waste products of fatty acid breakdown in the body. This is the result of burning fat, rather than glucose, to fuel the body. The body tries to dispose of excess ketones as quickly as possible when they are present in the blood. The kidneys filter out ketones and excrete them into the urine. Should you care about ketones? YES! If they build up, they can lead to very serious energy problems in the body, resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis, a true medical emergency. If the condition is not reversed and other systemic stresses are present, ketones may continue to rise and a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may occur. This condition can progress very quickly and cause severe illness. It is potentially fatal even when treated. Recognition of DKA and rapid treatment by your veterinarian can save your cat's life. Signs of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Drinking excessive amounts of water OR no water Excessive urination Diminished activity Not eating for over 12 hours Vomiting Lethargy and depression Weakness Breathing very fast Dehydration Ketone odor on breath (smells like nail-polish remover or fruit) Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus Inadequate insulin dosing or production Infection Concurrent diseas that stresses the animal Estrus Medication noncompliance Lethargy and depression Stress Surgery Idiopathic (unknown causes) Risk Factors for DKA Any condition that causes an insulin deficiency History of corticosteroid or beta-blocker administration Diagnosis Laboratory tests performed by your vet are necessary for diagnosis. Depending on how sick your c Continue reading >>

Why Isnt Ketoacidosis A Problem For Lc And Vlc Paleo-eaters?

Why Isnt Ketoacidosis A Problem For Lc And Vlc Paleo-eaters?

I'm sitting in a lecture about nutrition and metabolism for people with diabetes. The instructor keeps insisting that if you are metabolizing ketones for any length of time, it will result in ketoacidosis, and eventually kill you. I've not heard anything about LC and VLC paleo eaters having problems with ketoacidosis, but I'm not sure how we avoid it while primarily metabolizing ketone bodies. I understand that people with diabetes have more issues to work with, and are metabolically deranged, but how do people with normal metabolisms avoid acidosis issues? Can anyone please shed some light on this for me? I googled around and haven't found explanation. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Rapid, deep breathing. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. Confusion. Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some test strips nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high. When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through your vein and closely watching certain chemicals in your blood (electrolyt Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

4 Evaluation 5 Management Defining features include hyperglycemia (glucose > 250mg/dl), acidosis (pH < 7.3), and ketonemia/ketonuria Leads to osmotic diuresis and depletion of electrolytes including sodium, magnesium, calcium and phosphorous. Further dehydration impairs glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and contributes to acute renal failure Due to lipolysis / accumulation of of ketoacids (represented by increased anion gap) Compensatory respiratory alkalosis (i.e. tachypnea and hyperpnea - Kussmaul breathing) Breakdown of adipose creates first acetoacetate leading to conversion to beta-hydroxybutyrate Causes activation of RAAS in addition to the osmotic diuresis Cation loss (in exchange for chloride) worsens metabolic acidosis May be the initial presenting of an unrecognized T1DM patient Presenting signs/symptoms include altered mental status, tachypnea, abdominal pain, hypotension, decreased urine output. Perform a thorough neurologic exam (cerebral edema increases mortality significantly, especially in children) Assess for possible inciting cause (especially for ongoing infection; see Differential Diagnosis section) Ill appearance. Acetone breath. Drowsiness with decreased reflexes Tachypnea (Kussmaul's breathing) Signs of dehydration with dry mouth and dry mucosa. Perform a thorough neurologic exam as cerebral edema increases mortality significantly, especially in children There may be signs from underlying cause (eg pneumonia) Differential Diagnosis Insulin or oral hypoglycemic medication non-compliance Infection Intra-abdominal infections Steroid use Drug abuse Pregnancy Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Diagnosis is made based on the presence of acidosis and ketonemia in the setting of diabetes. Bicarb may be normal due to compensatory and contraction alcoholosis so the Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes – Flatbush Diabetes

Ketoacidosis In A Patient With Type 2 Diabetes – Flatbush Diabetes

There is increasing recognition of a group of patients with type 2 diabetes who can present with ketoacidosis. Most reports have been of patients of African descent; however, the condition has been reported in other groups. This is a case of a Caucasian patient who has had three presentations with ketoacidosis and whose diabetes is not usually insulin-dependent. A patient, aged 48 years, presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in a semi-comatose condition. She had a 3-day history of vomiting and loss of appetite. In the previous weeks she had undergone radiotherapy for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (skin primary). The patient had two similar episodes of DKA, one 20 months and another 3 months earlier. Two of the patient’s brothers had type 2 diabetes. The patient was not abusing alcohol and did not have a history of pancreatitis. Three years prior to this admission the patient had been diagnosed elsewhere with type 2 diabetes, for which she had been on metformin and a small dose of insulin glargine. Two months after stopping her insulin glargine she developed her first episode of DKA while visiting our town. DKA, was diagnosed on the basis of arterial pH 7.03, blood glucose level 25.9 mmol/L, bicarbonate level of 5 mmol/L and positive urinary ketones. It was felt that infected skin lesions may have precipitated the DKA. Eleven days later, she was discharged on metformin 250 mg twice daily and a falling dose of insulin glargine (26 units a day). She was then lost to follow-up in our centre, but apparently soon after did not require insulin and maintained adequate gylcaemic control for 18 months until just prior to her next admission solely on metformin 1 g twice daily. The next admission for DKA occurred while living in a city. She was discharged on insulin but Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What Is Ketoacidosis And How Can Be Avoided & Treated?

Diabetes: What Is Ketoacidosis And How Can Be Avoided & Treated?

Good question! According to Wikipedia: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. In order to define ketoacidosis a little better, let's go back to the source: diabetes. Someone who is diabetic is unable to produce insulin, a hormone necessary for the transfer of sugar from the bloodstream to the cells, which in turn produce energy. If this progression is disrupted, through lack of insulin for example, the body has to try to compensate by creating energy elsewhere. And so the body starts to burn fat and muscle to meet its energy needs. Unfortunately, this chemical reaction produces molecules known as ketone bodies. In small quantities, these are fine, and it is in fact normal to have traces of them in your blood (approximately 1mg/dl). However, if the quantity of ketones surpasses this threshold by too much, it starts to affect the pH of your blood (which becomes progressively more acidic). Even the slightest drop in pH can have dangerous effects: as the quantity of the ketones in your blood increases, and the blood pH diminishes, your kidneys start having problems. Eventually, if the ketoacidosis is left untreated, your kidneys can fail and you can die from dehydration, tachycardia and hypotension. A number of other symptoms can appear in extreme cases. Fortunately for us, the quantity of ketones has to be consequential, and it usually takes a while before individuals start manifesting symptoms. In my case, my diabetes went undiagnosed for a month and a half before it was discovered, and even then my ketone levels were relatively normal. If you're a diabetic, ketoacidosis can be easily avoided by controlling your blood sugar levels and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Some doctors, preferring to stay on the Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. Acidosis is classified as either respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of acidosis is usually caused when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through breathing. Other names for respiratory acidosis are hypercapnic acidosis and carbon dioxide acidosis. Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Chest deformities, such as kyphosis Chest injuries Chest muscle weakness Chronic lung disease Overuse of sedative drugs Metabolic acidosis develops when too much acid is produced in the body. It can also occur when the kidneys cannot remove enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis (also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA) develops when substances called ketone bodies (which are acidic) build up during uncontrolled diabetes. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused by the loss of too much sodium bicarbonate from the body, which can happen with severe diarrhea. Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Lactic acidosis is a buildup of lactic acid. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red blood cells. It forms when the body breaks down carbohydrates to use for energy when oxygen levels are low. This can be caused by: Cancer Drinking too much alcohol Exercising vigorously for a very long time Liver failure Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Medications, such as salicylates MELAS (a very rare genetic mitochondrial disorder that affects energy production) Prolonged lack of oxygen from shock, heart failure, or seve Continue reading >>

Syndromes Of Ketosis-prone Diabetes Mellitus

Syndromes Of Ketosis-prone Diabetes Mellitus

INTRODUCTION Since the mid-1990s, increasing attention has been focused on a heterogeneous condition characterized by presentation with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in patients who do not necessarily fit the typical characteristics of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Earlier reports used the terms "atypical diabetes," "Flatbush diabetes," "diabetes type 1B," and "ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes mellitus" to describe subsets of this condition, and it was noted that in some instances patients presented with DKA as the first manifestation of diabetes and evolved to insulin independence [1]. While initially these reports suggested that the condition, now termed ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD), might be limited to persons of non-Caucasian ethnicity, its prevalence appears to be increasing in a wide range of ethnic groups worldwide [2-5]. The classification, pathophysiology, natural history, and management of KPD will be reviewed here. Patients with islet autoantibodies who do not present with ketosis, including those termed "latent autoimmune diabetes in adults" (LADA), "type 1.5 diabetes" [6,7], and "slowly progressing type 1 diabetes" [8] are discussed elsewhere. (See "Classification of diabetes mellitus and genetic diabetic syndromes".) CLASSIFICATION OF KPD The goal of new classification schemes is to enable clinicians to predict which patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) require temporary insulin treatment versus life-long insulin therapy. They also highlight subgroups for genetic and pathogenetic studies. Ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD) comprises a group of diabetes syndromes characterized by severe beta cell dysfunction (manifested by presentation with DKA or unprovoked ketosis) and a variable clinical course. These syndromes do not fit the traditional categories of diabetes d Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a medical emergency caused by hyperglycemia, which results in large amounts of acid in the blood. Ketoacidosis can happen to people with type 1 diabetes; it is rare in people with type 2 diabetes. Untreated ketoacidosis may lead to diabetic coma or death. Ketoacidosis is caused by a buildup in the bloodstream of ketones, acids which are produced when the body burns fat to produce energy. The early symptoms of ketoacidosis include frequent urination, thirst, high blood glucose level, and high levels of ketones in the urine. As the condition develops, the patient may experience constant fatigue, dry or flushed skin, shortness of breath, difficulty paying attention, confusion, and vomiting. The American Diabetes Association list the following causes [1] of Ketones resulting into Ketoacidosis: Not getting enough insulin. Maybe you did not inject enough insulin. Or your body could need more insulin than usual because of illness. If there is not enough insulin, your body begins to break down body fat for energy. Not enough food. When people are sick, they often do not feel like eating. Then, high ketones may result. High ketones may also occur when someone misses a meal. An insulin reaction (low blood glucose). When blood glucose levels fall too low, the body must use fat to get energy. If testing shows high ketones in the morning, the person may have had an insulin reaction while asleep. Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous and serious complication and required immediate medical assistance. It results into complication like: Hypokalemia: a potentially fatal condition in which the body fails to retain sufficient potassium to maintain health. The condition is also known as potassium deficiency. Cerebral edema: Cerebral edema (cerebral oedema in British English) is Continue reading >>

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