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What Is Ketoacidosis Test

Ketones Blood Test

Ketones Blood Test

Acetone bodies; Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood; Ketoacidosis - ketones blood test A ketone blood test measures the amount of ketones in the blood. How the Test is Performed How to Prepare for the Test No preparation is needed. How the Test will Feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon goes away. Why the Test is Performed Ketones are substances produced in the liver when fat cells break down in the blood. This test is used to diagnose ketoacidosis. This is a life-threatening problem that affects people who: Have diabetes. It occurs when the body cannot use sugar (glucose) as a fuel source because there is no insulin or not enough insulin. Fat is used for fuel instead. When fat breaks down, waste products called ketones build up in the body. Drink large amounts of alcohol. Normal Results A normal test result is negative. This means there are no ketones in the blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your health care provider about the meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean A test result is positive if ketones are found in the blood. This may indicate: Other reasons ketones are found in the blood include: A diet low in carbohydrates can increase ketones. After receiving anesthesia for surgery Glycogen storage disease (condition in which the body can't break down glycogen, a form of sugar that is stored in the liver and muscles) Being on a weight-loss diet Risks Veins and arteries vary in size from one person to another and from one side of the body to the other. Continue reading >>

Testing Your Urine For Ketones

Testing Your Urine For Ketones

Learning to test for ketones at home is an important part of diabetes self-management. It's a simple and easy test, using special test strips available at Kaiser Permanente and other pharmacies. Diabetic Ketoacidosis High levels of ketones in the blood can lead to a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. A person can lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma with DKA. DKA happens when blood sugar levels are high for a long time because the body doesn't have enough insulin to turn the sugar into energy. Instead, the body burns stored fat, creating a waste product called ketones. Ketones build up in the bloodstream and then spill into the urine DKA happens more often in people with type 1 diabetes because their bodies don't make insulin. Although it's less common in people with type 2 diabetes, DKA can happen when someone is under extreme stress, experiences a trauma, or gets very sick. When to test A person with type 1 diabetes should check his or her urine for ketones whenever blood sugar levels stay higher than 240, even after he or she has done everything to bring blood sugar into the normal range. It's important to test for ketones several times a day when you're sick. Being sick often causes blood sugar levels to be higher than normal. DKA can develop quickly if you're very sick with a fever, flu, or any kind of infection, especially if you're throwing up or have diarrhea. Drink plenty of water or other calorie-free drinks to help keep you from getting dehydrated. Call a member of your health care team right away if your blood sugar is over 240 at 2 different tests that are 2 to 3 hours apart and your ketone test shows moderate to heavy (severe) ketone levels at both those tests. Also call if your level is over 240 and you have a fever, are th Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What Is Ketoacidosis And How Can Be Avoided & Treated?

Diabetes: What Is Ketoacidosis And How Can Be Avoided & Treated?

Good question! According to Wikipedia: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. In order to define ketoacidosis a little better, let's go back to the source: diabetes. Someone who is diabetic is unable to produce insulin, a hormone necessary for the transfer of sugar from the bloodstream to the cells, which in turn produce energy. If this progression is disrupted, through lack of insulin for example, the body has to try to compensate by creating energy elsewhere. And so the body starts to burn fat and muscle to meet its energy needs. Unfortunately, this chemical reaction produces molecules known as ketone bodies. In small quantities, these are fine, and it is in fact normal to have traces of them in your blood (approximately 1mg/dl). However, if the quantity of ketones surpasses this threshold by too much, it starts to affect the pH of your blood (which becomes progressively more acidic). Even the slightest drop in pH can have dangerous effects: as the quantity of the ketones in your blood increases, and the blood pH diminishes, your kidneys start having problems. Eventually, if the ketoacidosis is left untreated, your kidneys can fail and you can die from dehydration, tachycardia and hypotension. A number of other symptoms can appear in extreme cases. Fortunately for us, the quantity of ketones has to be consequential, and it usually takes a while before individuals start manifesting symptoms. In my case, my diabetes went undiagnosed for a month and a half before it was discovered, and even then my ketone levels were relatively normal. If you're a diabetic, ketoacidosis can be easily avoided by controlling your blood sugar levels and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Some doctors, preferring to stay on the Continue reading >>

Lab Test

Lab Test

Measurement of beta-hydroxybutyrate in whole blood, serum, or plasma to evaluate ketone-producing metabolic energy deficits that usually occur when there is insufficient carbohydrate metabolism, thereby increasing the catabolism of fatty acids. Clinical Application Common tests for ketone bodies, such as Acetest, Chemstrip, and Ketostix, do not detect beta-hydroxybutyrate. A handheld meter sensor system is available to monitor beta-hydroxybutyrate and glucose levels. Elevated levels beta-hydroxybutyrate is diagnostic of ketoacidosis, whereas the absence of concomitant hyperglycemia supports the diagnosis of alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). Levels ³ 3 mmol/L are indicative of ketoacidosis. In very severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), the beta-hydroxybutyrate serum concentration may exceed 25 mmol/L. Patients presenting with isopropanol intoxication can present with high acetone levels without any acidosis, anion gap or abnormal glucoses levels. Plasma (lithium-heparin or fluoride-oxalate), serum, or perchloric acid (PCA) extracts can be analyzed. EDTA-plasma samples will produce values that are 60% lower than specimens preserved with fluoride-oxalate or PCA. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

show all detail Diagnostic Tests 1st Tests To Order Test Result plasma glucose To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In elevated ABG To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In pH varies from 7.00 to 7.30 in DKA; arterial bicarbonate ranges from <10 mEq/L in severe DKA to >15 mEq/L in mild DKA capillary or serum ketones To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In beta-hydroxybutyrate elevated ≥3.8 mmol/L in adults or ≥3.0 mmol/L in children U/A To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In positive for glucose and ketones; positive for leukocytes and nitrites in the presence of infection serum BUN To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In elevated serum creatinine To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In elevated serum sodium To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In usually low serum potassium To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In usually el Continue reading >>

Diagnostic Accuracy Of Point-of-care Testing For Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Emergency-department Triage

Diagnostic Accuracy Of Point-of-care Testing For Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Emergency-department Triage

OBJECTIVE In the emergency department, hyperglycemic patients are screened for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) via a urine dipstick. In this prospective study, we compared the test characteristics of point-of-care β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) analysis with the urine dipstick. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Emergency-department patients with blood glucose ≥250 mg/dL had urine dipstick, chemistry panel, venous blood gas, and capillary β-OHB measurements. DKA was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS Of 516 hyperglycemic subjects, 54 had DKA. The urine dipstick had a sensitivity of 98.1% (95% CI 90.1–100), a specificity of 35.1% (30.7–39.6), a positive predictive value of 15% (11.5–19.2), and a negative predictive value of 99.4% (96.6–100) for DKA. Using the manufacturer-suggested cutoff of >1.5 mmol/L, β-OHB had a sensitivity of 98.1% (90.1–100), a specificity of 78.6% (74.5–82.2), a positive predictive value of 34.9% (27.3–43), and a negative predictive value of 99.7% (98.5–100) for DKA. CONCLUSIONS Point-of-care β-OHB and the urine dipstick are equally sensitive for detecting DKA (98.1%). However, β-OHB is more specific (78.6 vs. 35.1%), offering the potential to significantly reduce unnecessary DKA work-ups among hyperglycemic patients in the emergency department. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective, observational study was conducted at a large, urban emergency department. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and study participants provided written informed consent. The cohort studied represents a convenience sample of emergency-department patients with triage capillary blood glucose ≥250 mg/dL enrolled on 320 individual days over a 2-year period based on research-assistant availability. Subjects we Continue reading >>

What Is The Dumbest Reason You Have Seen For Someone To Go To The Hospital?

What Is The Dumbest Reason You Have Seen For Someone To Go To The Hospital?

I kid you not. I was a junior doctor at a busy London A&E department, where queues were piling up of people waiting to be seen. There was an array of the usual presentations, including the breathless asthmatic, a couple of chest pains, renal colics, nausea and vomiting and so on as expected. What I never expected, was this young woman who had waited almost 3 hours to be seen, who presented with what was essentially a papercut. She was wearing smart office attire, and reported to have nicked her finger on a filing folder at her office, sustaining a superficial cut of about 4cm length. After wondering how this case had gotten past the triage nurse, I asked if the cut was painful. “Not so much now”, the woman said. I asked if she'd washed it at all. “Yes,” she told me. Then I asked what her concern was. She articulated to me that her worry was to catch an infection since the cut was so long, and she didn't want to risk having her finger amputated or anything drastic as such. With all the calm I could possible muster, after reassuring the woman that she wouldn't be needing any amputations, I explained that this was not an emergency. She did not have to wait the 3 hours to be seen, nor taken up emergency department time and resources, and that basic first aid would have been sufficient. She apologised, thanked me and left with a fresh Band-Aid on her finger. Continue reading >>

Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis vs Ketoacidosis When looking at a ketogenic diet and ketosis, it’s common for some people to confuse the process with a harmful, more extreme version of this state known as diabetic ketoacidosis. But there are a lot of misconceptions out there about ketosis vs ketoacidosis, and it’s time to shed some light on the subject by looking at the (very big) differences between the two. An Overview of Ketosis A ketogenic, or keto, diet is centered around the process of ketosis, so it’s important to understand exactly what ketosis is first before we get into whether or not it’s safe (spoiler: it is): Ketosis is a metabolic state where the body is primarily using fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. Burning carbohydrates (glucose) for energy is the default function of the body, so if glucose is available, the body will use that first. But during ketosis, the body is using ketones instead of glucose. This is an amazing survival adaptation by the body for handling periods of famine or fasting, extreme exercise, or anything else that leaves the body without enough glucose for fuel. Those eating a ketogenic diet purposely limit their carb intake (usually between 20 and 50 grams per day) to facilitate this response. That’s why the keto diet focuses on very low carb intake, moderate to low protein intake, and high intakes of dietary fats. Lower protein is important because it prevents the body from pulling your lean muscle mass for energy and instead turns to fat. Ketone bodies are released during ketosis and are created by the liver from fatty acids. These ketones are then used by the body to power all of its biggest organs, including the brain, and they have many benefits for the body we’ll get into later. But first, let’s address a common mi Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

What are ketones? Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for energy or fuel. They are also produced when you lose weight or if there is not enough insulin to help your body use sugar for energy. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. Since the body is unable to use glucose for energy, it breaks down fat instead. When this occurs, ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. These ketones can make you very sick. How can I test for ketones? You can test to see if your body is making any ketones by doing a simple urine test. There are several products available for ketone testing and they can be purchased, without a prescription, at your pharmacy. The test result can be negative, or show small, moderate, or large quantities of ketones. When should I test for ketones? Anytime your blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. Often illness, infections, or injuries will cause sudden high blood glucose and this is an especially important time to check for ketones. When you are planning to exercise and the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and any time the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If ketones are positive, what does this mean? There are situations when you might have ketones without the blood glucose being too high. Positive ketones are not a problem when blood glucose levels are within range and you are trying to lose weight. It is a problem if blood glucose levels are high and left untreated. Untreated high blood glucose with positive ketones can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). What should I do if the ketone test is positive? Call your diabetes educator or physician, as you may need additional Continue reading >>

New Quantitative Test Ketone Beta-hydroxybutyrate

New Quantitative Test Ketone Beta-hydroxybutyrate

Effective December 13, 2016, TriCore changed to a new quantitative test to measure ketones in plasma or serum. The new test, Ketone Beta-hydroxybutyrate (KETBHB), measures Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and is not directly comparable to the previous test measuring acetoacetate. BHB shows different clearance during treatment of ketoacidosis. As diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is treated, serum BHB decreases more consistently than acetoacetate which is converted to BHB and does not change as rapidly. CLINICAL UTILITY BHB is the predominate ketone present during DKA and trends with a patient’s clinical status. Because KETBH is quantitative, it can be used for monitoring ketosis to resolution. Additionally, BHB can be used to clinically diagnose and monitor the disease status or severity of alcoholism, glycogen storage disease, high fat/low carbohydrate diets, pregnancy, alkalosis, ingestion of isopropyl alcohol, and salicylate poisoning. In these situations the levels are usually above the normal range which is up to 0.27 mml/L, but often do not reach the threshold for DKA diagnosis. RESULTS INTERPRETATION FOR BETA-HYDROXYBUTYRATE LEVELS Range mmol/dL Interpretation Sensitivity for DKA Specificity for DKA <0.27 no ketoacidosis, normal range 0.28-1.5 DKA not entirely excluded, other conditions should be considered 1.5-3.0 children DKA possible in diabetics with >250mg/dL glucose 98-100% 78-93% 1.5-3.8 adults DKA possible in diabetics with >250mg/dL glucose 98-100% 78-93% >3.0 children >3.8 adults Near diagnostic of DKA in diabetic patient near 100% 93-94% 1. A Beta-hyroxybutyrate level of more than 1.5 mmol/L had sensitivity ranging from 98-100% and specificity ranging from 78.6-93.3% for the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis in diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Workup

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Workup

Approach Considerations Diabetic ketoacidosis is typically characterized by hyperglycemia over 250 mg/dL, a bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq/L, and a pH less than 7.30, with ketonemia and ketonuria. While definitions vary, mild DKA can be categorized by a pH level of 7.25-7.3 and a serum bicarbonate level between 15-18 mEq/L; moderate DKA can be categorized by a pH between 7.0-7.24 and a serum bicarbonate level of 10 to less than 15 mEq/L; and severe DKA has a pH less than 7.0 and bicarbonate less than 10 mEq/L. [17] In mild DKA, anion gap is greater than 10 and in moderate or severe DKA the anion gap is greater than 12. These figures differentiate DKA from HHS where blood glucose is greater than 600 mg/dL but pH is greater than 7.3 and serum bicarbonate greater than 15 mEq/L. Laboratory studies for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) should be scheduled as follows: Repeat laboratory tests are critical, including potassium, glucose, electrolytes, and, if necessary, phosphorus. Initial workup should include aggressive volume, glucose, and electrolyte management. It is important to be aware that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

EDIT: My very first century upvote. Thank you ALL for your upvotes and encouragement! One word: insulin. Insulin is a kind of hormone produced by your body to keep your blood sugar level under control. Whenever you eat, your body starts digesting the food and releases tiny bouts of micronutrients (glucose, fatty acids or amino acids) into your blood stream. To counter this increase, your body triggers an insulin response to instruct the liver to absorb the extra amount of glucose to bring your blood sugar level to normal. As insulin is a hormone, it becomes tricky because different people react differently to hormones. Some people are very sensitive to a certain kind of hormone. Other people can be virtually immune to that kind of hormone. Same for insulin. In your case it sounds like your body is very sensitive to insulin. Either your body produces more insulin than normal, or your body reacts more sensitively to a given level of insulin. Either way, your liver would overwork to bring down your blood glucose level below normal in the short term, until it slowly recovers back to the normal level. This short term overshoot of blood glucose reduction causes fatigue and lethargy. See more: Sugar crash (Wikipedia)- A second possibility is that your diet is typically full of high GI food. GI stands for glycemic index which measures how much of insulin response a particular type of food triggers. The lower the GI, the less insulin required by your body to digest that food. Low GI food is typically slow-digesting food such as whole grain as opposed to refined grain, ie complex carb vs simple sugar. Vegetables are also low GI as it contains very few simple carbohydrates. In fact, most natural food tends to be complex and thus slower to digest and low GI; modern processed food t Continue reading >>

Blood Ketones

Blood Ketones

On This Site Tests: Urine Ketones (see Urinalysis - The Chemical Exam); Blood Gases; Glucose Tests Elsewhere On The Web Ask a Laboratory Scientist Your questions will be answered by a laboratory scientist as part of a voluntary service provided by one of our partners, the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS). Click on the Contact a Scientist button below to be re-directed to the ASCLS site to complete a request form. If your question relates to this web site and not to a specific lab test, please submit it via our Contact Us page instead. Thank you. Continue reading >>

Ketones Blood Test

Ketones Blood Test

Acetone bodies; Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood; Ketoacidosis - ketones blood test A ketone blood test measures the amount of ketones in the blood. How the Test is Performed How to Prepare for the Test No preparation is needed. How the Test will Feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon goes away. Why the Test is Performed Ketones are substances produced in the liver when fat cells break down in the blood. This test is used to diagnose ketoacidosis. This is a life-threatening problem that affects people who: Have diabetes. It occurs when the body cannot use sugar (glucose) as a fuel source because there is no insulin or not enough insulin. Fat is used for fuel instead. When fat breaks down, waste products called ketones build up in the body. Drink large amounts of alcohol. Normal Results A normal test result is negative. This means there are no ketones in the blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your health care provider about the meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean A test result is positive if ketones are found in the blood. This may indicate: Other reasons ketones are found in the blood include: A diet low in carbohydrates can increase ketones. After receiving anesthesia for surgery Glycogen storage disease (condition in which the body can't break down glycogen, a form of sugar that is stored in the liver and muscles) Being on a weight-loss diet Risks Veins and arteries vary in size from one person to another and from one side of the body to the other. Continue reading >>

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