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What Is Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Sibai, Baha M. MD; Viteri, Oscar A. MD Pregnancies complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis are associated with increased rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is required, because diabetic ketoacidosis onset in pregnancy can be insidious, usually at lower glucose levels, and often progresses more rapidly as compared with nonpregnancy. Morbidity and mortality can be reduced with early detection of precipitating factors (ie, infection, intractable vomiting, inadequate insulin management or inappropriate insulin cessation, β-sympathomimetic use, steroid administration for fetal lung maturation), prompt hospitalization, and targeted therapy with intensive monitoring. A multidisciplinary approach including a maternal-fetal medicine physician, medical endocrinology specialists familiar with the physiologic changes in pregnancy, an obstetric anesthesiologist, and skilled nursing is paramount. Management principles include aggressive volume replacement, initiation of intravenous insulin therapy, correction of acidosis, correction of electrolyte abnormalities and management of precipitating factors, as well as monitoring of maternal-fetal response to treatment. When diabetic ketoacidosis occurs after 24 weeks of gestation, fetal status should be continuously monitored given associated fetal hypoxemia and acidosis. The decision for delivery can be challenging and must be based on gestational age as well as maternal-fetal responses to therapy. The natural inclination is to proceed with emergent delivery for nonreassuring fetal status that is frequently present during the acute episode, but it is imperative to correct the maternal metabolic abnormalities first, because both maternal and fetal conditions will likewise improve. Prevention strategies shou Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

If you have type 1 diabetes, you should be given ketone testing strips and a monitor. Your care team should advise you to test the ketone levels in your blood if your blood glucose is too high (known as hyperglycaemia) or if you are unwell. This is because you are at risk of a serious condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). People with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk of DKA (although anyone with diabetes can get it). If you have any form of diabetes, your care team should advise you to get urgent medical advice if you have hyperglycaemia or you are feeling unwell, to make sure you don't have DKA. Your ketone levels should be checked as soon as possible. If you are thought to have DKA you should be admitted straight away to a unit where you can get specialist care. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening medical emergency and is characterized by hyperglycemia, acidosis, and ketonemia. DKA is observed in 5–10 % of all pregnancies complicated by pregestational diabetes mellitus. Laboratory findings are as follows: Ketonemia 3 mmol/L and over or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks) Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus Bicarbonate (HCO3 −−) below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3 Common risk factors for DKA in pregnancy are new-onset diabetes, infections like UTI, influenza, poor patient compliance, insulin pump failure, treatment with β-mimetic tocolytic medications, and antenatal corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity. Patient should be counseled about the precipitating cause and early warning symptoms of DKA. DKA should be treated promptly, and HDU/level 2 facility with trained nursing staff and/or insertion of central line is required during pregnancy for its management. Continuous fetal heart rate monitoring commonly demonstrates recurrent late decelerations. Delivery is rarely indicated as FHR pattern resolves as maternal condition improves. DKA therapy can lead to frequent complication of hypoglycemia and hypokalemia, so glucose and K concentration monitoring should be done judiciously. Maternal mortality is rare now with proper management, but fetal mortality is still quite high ranging from 10 to 35 %. Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Introduction: Starvation ketosis outside pregnancy is a rare phenomenon and is unlikely to cause a severe acidosis. Pregnancy is an insulin resistant state due to placental production of hormones including glucagon and human placental lactogen. Insulin resistance increases with advancing gestation and this confers a susceptibility to ketosis, particularly in the third trimester. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy has been reported and is usually precipitated by a period of severe vomiting. Ketoacidosis has been associated with intrauterine death. Case report: A 22-year-old woman in her third pregnancy presented at 32 weeks gestation with a 24 h history of severe vomiting. She had been treated for an asthma exacerbation with prednisolone and erythromycin the day prior to presentation. She was unwell, hypertensive (145/70 mmHg) with a sinus tachycardia and Kussmaul breathing. Urinalysis showed ++++ ketones, + protein and pH 5. Fingerprick glucose was 4 mmol/l and ketones were 4.0 mmol/l. Arterial blood gas showed pH 7.27, PaCO2 1.1 kPa, base excess −23, bicarbonate 8.6 mmol/l and lactate 0.6 mmol/l. The anion gap was 20. Serum ethanol, salicylates and paracetamol levels were undetectable. She was fluid resuscitated but her biochemical parameters did not improve. She was intubated and underwent emergency caesarean section. A healthy boy was delivered and her acidosis resolved over the subsequent 8 h. Discussion: We believe this case is explained by starvation ketoacidosis. There was no evidence of diabetes mellitus or other causes of a metabolic acidosis. In view of the hypertension, proteinuria and raised urate the differential diagnosis was an atypical presentation of pre-eclampsia. This case illustrates the metabolic stress imposed by the feto-placental unit. It als Continue reading >>

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious medical and obstetrical emergency usually occurring in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Although modern management of the patient with diabetes should prevent the occurrence of DKA during pregnancy, this complication still occurs and can result in significant morbidity and mortality for mother and/or fetus. Metabolic changes occurring during pregnancy can predispose a pregnant diabetic to DKA. The diagnosis of DKA can be more challenging during pregnancy as it does not always manifest with the classic presenting symptoms or laboratory findings. In fact, although uncommon, during pregnancy, DKA may develop even in the setting of relative normoglycemia. Prompt diagnosis and management is essential in order to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes. This article will provide the reader with information regarding the pathophysiology underlying DKA complicating pregnancy and will provide practical management guidelines for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Continue reading >>

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Summarized from Frise C, Mackillop L, Joash K et al. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol 2012. Available online ahead of publication at: Arterial blood gas analysis in cases of metabolic acidosis reveals primary decrease in pH and bicarbonate, and secondary (compensatory) reduction in pCO2. The most common cause of metabolic acidosis is increased production of endogenous metabolic acids, either lactic acid, in which case the condition is called lactic acidosis, or keto-acids, in which case the condition is called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis most commonly occurs as an acute and life-threatening complication of type I diabetes, due to severe insulin deficiency and resulting reduced glucose availability for energy production within cells (insulin is required for glucose to enter cells). Keto-acids accumulate in blood as a result of metabolism of fats mobilized to fill the energy gap created by reduced availability of glucose within cells. Starvation is also associated with reduced availability of (dietary) glucose and potential for ketoacidosis, although compared with diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis is rare, usually mild and not life-threatening. Except, that is, when it occurs during pregnancy. In a recently published paper the authors outline four cases of severe starvation ketoacidosis, all occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy, following prolonged vomiting over a period of days. All four women presented for emergency admission in a very poorly state and still vomiting with severe partially compensated metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate in the range of 8-13 mmol/L and base deficit in the range of 14-22 mmol/L). All four required transfer to intensive care and premature delivery of their babies by emergency Cesarean section. Fort Continue reading >>

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious medical and obstetrical emergency usually occurring in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Although modern management of the patient with diabetes should prevent the occurrence of DKA during pregnancy, this complication still occurs and can result in significant morbidity and mortality for mother and/or fetus. Metabolic changes occurring during pregnancy can predispose a pregnant diabetic to DKA. The diagnosis of DKA can be more challenging during pregnancy as it does not always manifest with the classic presenting symptoms or laboratory findings. In fact, although uncommon, during pregnancy, DKA may develop even in the setting of relative normoglycemia. Prompt diagnosis and management is essential in order to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes. This article will provide the reader with information regarding the pathophysiology underlying DKA complicating pregnancy and will provide practical management guidelines for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Ketoacidosis: Is Pancreatitis A Missing Link?

Pregnancy And Ketoacidosis: Is Pancreatitis A Missing Link?

Non-diabetic ketoacidosis is increasingly recognised in pregnancy, particularly during the third trimester, and is usually associated with vomiting. In many cases, the cause of the vomiting is not identified and resolves rapidly, alongside the metabolic abnormalities, following delivery. Here, we report three cases in which pancreatitis was identified as an underlying cause of the gastrointestinal symptoms. To our knowledge, these are the first reports of pancreatitis precipitating non-diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy. This case series highlights the importance of searching for a precipitant for non-diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy, rather than focusing solely on management of the resulting metabolic abnormalities. Continue reading >>

Managing Severe Preeclampsia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Managing Severe Preeclampsia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

US Pharm. 2010;35(9):HS-2-HS-8. Pregnancy is associated with increased levels of emotional and physical stress. Women with preexisting conditions such as hypertension and diabetes require intense prenatal monitoring by health care professionals. Pharmacists in direct contact with patients can play an integral role in identifying signs and symptoms that require immediate care. Two conditions that require emergent treatment in pregnant women are severe preeclampsia and diabetic ketoacidosis. SEVERE PREECLAMPSIA Hypertensive disorders can affect 6% to 8% of women and increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in both the expectant mother and the unborn child.1,2 Hypertension in pregnancy is divided into four categories: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension. The focus in this article is on severe preeclampsia, but a brief discussion of preeclampsia is warranted. Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific syndrome of unknown etiology, is a multiorgan disease process characterized by the development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks' gestation.1,2 See TABLE 1 for diagnostic criteria.1,2 History of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, chronic hypertension, chronic renal disease, elevated body-mass index, age 40 years or older, multiple gestation, nulliparity, preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, and pregestational diabetes mellitus increase a woman's risk of preeclampsia.1 Preeclampsia is classified as mild or severe based on the degree of hypertension, the level of proteinuria, and the presence of symptoms resulting from the involvement of the kidneys, brain, liver, and cardiovascular system. The incidence of severe preeclampsia is 0.9% in the United States.3 Severe preeclampsia is associate Continue reading >>

What Is The Origin/mechanism Of Abdominal Pain In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What Is The Origin/mechanism Of Abdominal Pain In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Other than all papers I could find citing the depth of the keto-acidosis (and not the height of the blood glucose levels) correlating with abdominal pain, nothing else to explain how these two are linked. Decades ago, I was taught that because of the keto-acidosis causing a shift of intracellular potassium (having been exchanged for H+ protons of which in keto-acidosis there were too many of in the extracellular fluid) to the extracellular, so also the blood compartment, resulting in hyperkalemia, paralyzing the stomach, which could become grossly dilated - that’s why we often put in a nasogastric drainage tube to prevent vomiting and aspiration - and thus cause “stomach pain”. This stomach pain in the majority of cases indeed went away after the keto-acidosis was treated and serum electrolyte levels normalized. In one patient it didn’t, she remained very, very metabolically acidotic, while blood glucose levels normalized, later we found her to have a massive and fatal intestinal infarction as the underlying reason for her keto-acidosis….. Continue reading >>

Chapter 11: Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Chapter 11: Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Despite recent advances in the evaluation and medical treatment of diabetes in pregnancy, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) remains a matter of significant concern. The fetal loss rate in most contemporary series has been estimated to range from 10% to 25%. Fortunately, since the advent and implementation of insulin therapy, the maternal mortality rate has declined to 1% or less. In order to favorably influence the outcome in these high-risk patients, it is imperative that the obstetrician/provider be familiar with the basics of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of DKA in pregnancy. DKA is characterized by hyperglycemia and accelerated ketogenesis. Both a lack of insulin and an excess of glucagon and other counter-regulatory hormones significantly contribute to these problems and their resultant clinical manifestations. Glucose normally enters the cell secondary to the effects of insulin. The cell then may use glucose for nutrition and energy production. When insulin is lacking, glucose fails to enter the cell. The cell responds to this starvation by facilitating the release of counter-regulatory hormones, including glucagon, catecholamines, and cortisol. These counter-regulatory hormones are responsible for providing the cell with an alternative substrate for nutrition and energy production. By the process of gluconeogenesis, fatty acids from adipose tissue are broken down by hepatocytes to ketones (acetone, acetoacetate, and β-hydroxybutyrate [BHB] = ketone bodies), which are then used by the body cells for nutrition and energy production (Fig. 11-1). The lack of insulin also contributes to increased lipolysis and decreased reutilization of free fatty acids, thereby providing more substrate for hepatic ketogenesis. A basic review of the biochemistry involving D Continue reading >>

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract: Background: Pregnant women are predisposed to accelerated starvation due to continuous nutrient demands by the fetus, and they have increased susceptibility to ketogenesis during periods of caloric deprivation [1, 2]. We report a case of starvation ketoacidosis in a patient with gestational diabetes on a carbohydrate-restricted diet. Clinical case: A 30 year-old woman, gravida 5, para 2, with a history of spina bifida and hydrocephalus status post ventriculoperitoneal shunt, presented at 37 weeks of gestation with dyspnea. Her pregnancy had been complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus treated with a carbohydrate-restricted diet of 30 g a day. Due to a previous pregnancy complicated by late intrauterine fetal demise, a caesarean section was planned at 37 weeks of gestation after administration of steroids to induce fetal lung maturity. On admission, the patient’s blood pressure was 116/69 mm Hg, heart rate 106 beats per minute, oral temperature 36 °C, pulse ox 97%, and respiratory rate 20 breaths per minute. Laboratory tests showed a mixed metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis with pH 7.3 (7.33 - 7.43), HCO3 7.3 meq/l (20 - 27 meq/l), positive urinary ketones, and glucose of 75 mg/dl (65 – 139 mg/dl). Her glycosylated hemoglobin was 5.8% (4.0 - 6.0 %), C-peptide level 14.3 ng/ml (0.6 - 12.0 ng/ml), total insulin level 4.1 uU/ml (5 to 25 uU/ml), and lactate 1.8 mmol/l (0.5 - 2.2 mmol/l). Her dyspnea progressed, requiring intubation followed by emergent caesarean section. Afterwards, she was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit. She was treated with intravenous fluids containing dextrose and bicarbonate; she never received insulin and her blood glucose ranged from 65 to 139 mg/dl. By hospital day 3, the metabolic acidosis resolved, and Continue reading >>

Retrospective Analysis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnant Women Over A Period Of 3 Years

Retrospective Analysis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnant Women Over A Period Of 3 Years

1Department of Diabetes and Endocrine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar 3Department of Obstetrics, Sidra Medical and Research Center, Doha, Qatar Corresponding Author: Khaled Ahmed Baagar Department of Diabetes and Endocrine Hamad Medical Corporation, P.O. Box 3050, Doha, Qatar Tel: +974-66049423 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Baagar KA, Aboudi AK, Khaldi HM, Alowinati BI, Abou-Samra AB, et al. (2017) Retrospective Analysis of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Pregnant Women over a Period of 3 Years . Endocrinol Metab Syndr 6:265. doi:10.4172/2161-1017.1000265 Copyright: © 2017 Baagar KA, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Endocrinology & Metabolic Syndrome Abstract Objective: The incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy (DKP) varies from 0.5%, the lowest reported rate in western countries, to 8.9% in a study conducted in China. The associated fetal mortality is 9-36%. This study aimed to assess the current incidence, causes, and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and identify factors associated with favorable outcomes. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 20 diabetic ketoacidosis hospital admissions of 19 pregnant women from 3,679 diabetic pregnancies delivered between June 2012 and May 2015 was conducted. Those with successful DKP management (group A) or with intrauterine fetal death or urgent delivery during diabetic ketoacidosis management (group B) were compared. Results: Thirteen cases had type 1 diabetes, and 6 cases had Continue reading >>

A Case Of A Woman With Late-pregnancy-onset Dka Who Had Normal Glucose Tolerance In The First Trimester

A Case Of A Woman With Late-pregnancy-onset Dka Who Had Normal Glucose Tolerance In The First Trimester

Hiromi Himuro, Takashi Sugiyama, Hidekazu Nishigori, Masatoshi Saito, Satoru Nagase, Junichi Sugawara and Nobuo Yaegashi Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8574, Japan Summary Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) during pregnancy is a serious complication in both mother and fetus. Most incidences occur during late pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report the rare case of a woman with type 1 diabetes mellitus who had normal glucose tolerance during the first trimester but developed DKA during late pregnancy. Although she had initially tested positive for screening of gestational diabetes mellitus during the first trimester, subsequent diagnostic 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests showed normal glucose tolerance. She developed DKA with severe general fatigue in late pregnancy. The patient's general condition improved after treatment for ketoacidosis, and she vaginally delivered a healthy infant at term. The presence of DKA caused by the onset of diabetes should be considered, even if the patient shows normal glucose tolerance during the first trimester. The presence of DKA caused by the onset of diabetes should be considered, even if the patient shows normal glucose tolerance during the first trimester. Symptoms including severe general fatigue, nausea, and weight loss are important signs to suspect DKA. Findings such as Kussmaul breathing with ketotic odor are also typical. Urinary test, atrial gas analysis, and anion gap are important. If pH shows normal value, calculation of anion gap is important. If the value of anion gap is more than 12, a practitioner should consider the presence of metabolic acidosis. Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute metabol Continue reading >>

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