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What Is Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy.

Abstract Pregnancies complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis are associated with increased rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is required, because diabetic ketoacidosis onset in pregnancy can be insidious, usually at lower glucose levels, and often progresses more rapidly as compared with nonpregnancy. Morbidity and mortality can be reduced with early detection of precipitating factors (ie, infection, intractable vomiting, inadequate insulin management or inappropriate insulin cessation, β-sympathomimetic use, steroid administration for fetal lung maturation), prompt hospitalization, and targeted therapy with intensive monitoring. A multidisciplinary approach including a maternal-fetal medicine physician, medical endocrinology specialists familiar with the physiologic changes in pregnancy, an obstetric anesthesiologist, and skilled nursing is paramount. Management principles include aggressive volume replacement, initiation of intravenous insulin therapy, correction of acidosis, correction of electrolyte abnormalities and management of precipitating factors, as well as monitoring of maternal-fetal response to treatment. When diabetic ketoacidosis occurs after 24 weeks of gestation, fetal status should be continuously monitored given associated fetal hypoxemia and acidosis. The decision for delivery can be challenging and must be based on gestational age as well as maternal-fetal responses to therapy. The natural inclination is to proceed with emergent delivery for nonreassuring fetal status that is frequently present during the acute episode, but it is imperative to correct the maternal metabolic abnormalities first, because both maternal and fetal conditions will likewise improve. Prevention strategies should include education of diabet Continue reading >>

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

A Case Of Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract: Background: Pregnant women are predisposed to accelerated starvation due to continuous nutrient demands by the fetus, and they have increased susceptibility to ketogenesis during periods of caloric deprivation [1, 2]. We report a case of starvation ketoacidosis in a patient with gestational diabetes on a carbohydrate-restricted diet. Clinical case: A 30 year-old woman, gravida 5, para 2, with a history of spina bifida and hydrocephalus status post ventriculoperitoneal shunt, presented at 37 weeks of gestation with dyspnea. Her pregnancy had been complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus treated with a carbohydrate-restricted diet of 30 g a day. Due to a previous pregnancy complicated by late intrauterine fetal demise, a caesarean section was planned at 37 weeks of gestation after administration of steroids to induce fetal lung maturity. On admission, the patient’s blood pressure was 116/69 mm Hg, heart rate 106 beats per minute, oral temperature 36 °C, pulse ox 97%, and respiratory rate 20 breaths per minute. Laboratory tests showed a mixed metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis with pH 7.3 (7.33 - 7.43), HCO3 7.3 meq/l (20 - 27 meq/l), positive urinary ketones, and glucose of 75 mg/dl (65 – 139 mg/dl). Her glycosylated hemoglobin was 5.8% (4.0 - 6.0 %), C-peptide level 14.3 ng/ml (0.6 - 12.0 ng/ml), total insulin level 4.1 uU/ml (5 to 25 uU/ml), and lactate 1.8 mmol/l (0.5 - 2.2 mmol/l). Her dyspnea progressed, requiring intubation followed by emergent caesarean section. Afterwards, she was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit. She was treated with intravenous fluids containing dextrose and bicarbonate; she never received insulin and her blood glucose ranged from 65 to 139 mg/dl. By hospital day 3, the metabolic acidosis resolved, and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious medical and obstetrical emergency usually occurring in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Although modern management of the patient with diabetes should prevent the occurrence of DKA during pregnancy, this complication still occurs and can result in significant morbidity and mortality for mother and/or fetus. Metabolic changes occurring during pregnancy can predispose a pregnant diabetic to DKA. The diagnosis of DKA can be more challenging during pregnancy as it does not always manifest with the classic presenting symptoms or laboratory findings. In fact, although uncommon, during pregnancy, DKA may develop even in the setting of relative normoglycemia. Prompt diagnosis and management is essential in order to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes. This article will provide the reader with information regarding the pathophysiology underlying DKA complicating pregnancy and will provide practical management guidelines for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetes Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious medical and obstetrical emergency usually occurring in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Although modern management of the patient with diabetes should prevent the occurrence of DKA during pregnancy, this complication still occurs and can result in significant morbidity and mortality for mother and/or fetus. Metabolic changes occurring during pregnancy can predispose a pregnant diabetic to DKA. The diagnosis of DKA can be more challenging during pregnancy as it does not always manifest with the classic presenting symptoms or laboratory findings. In fact, although uncommon, during pregnancy, DKA may develop even in the setting of relative normoglycemia. Prompt diagnosis and management is essential in order to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes. This article will provide the reader with information regarding the pathophysiology underlying DKA complicating pregnancy and will provide practical management guidelines for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic ketoacidosis affects only 1% to 3% of pregnancies complicated by diabetes; nonetheless it is an acute medical emergency with a potential for dire consequences for both mother and fetus.9,19,31 The maternal mortality rate secondary to diabetes has fallen remarkably from a preinsulin era high of 50% to less than 1% today.18 The rate of maternal loss owing to diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy is unknown but most likely ranges from 4% to 15%.18,24,46 The majority of reports on ketoacidosis in pregnancy contain data on 20 or fewer patients, thus maternal mortality rates once ketoacidosis ensues must be extrapolated from nonpregnant data. In the series reported by Gabbe and co-workers,18 7 of 24 deaths in pregnant diabetic women resulted from metabolic complications, with 4 caused by ketoacidosis. Clements and Vourganti11 and Hollingsworth28 have suggested that many of these deaths could have been prevented by appropriate management. Diabetic ketoacidosis more commonly occurs in the second and third trimesters when increased insulin resistance is present.18,41 Fetal mortality has also decreased markedly since the introduction of insulin; however, it is still excessively high. Historically, fetal loss rates have ranged from 30% to 90%.16,32,33 Recently, Montoro and co-workers39 studied 20 type I diabetic pregnant women with ketoacidosis. On admission, seven women (35%) were diagnosed with a fetal demise. None of the remaining 13 women sustained fetal loss once therapy was begun. Kilvert and colleagues31 reported a fetal loss rate of 22% (including spontaneous abortions), with only one (14%) loss among seven cases occurring after the first trimester. Kent and co-workers30 compared fetal mortality among 21 pregnant women with brittle diabetes (those with recurrent keto Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats?

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats?

When I was working as a clinical ICU pharmacist, I saw DKA more than once. It’s not something you forget easily. Diabetic Ketoacidosis, medically abbreviated at KDA, is an acute (fast onset) life threatening situation that happens as a complication of poorly controlled diabetes. In a nutshell, when your body doesn’t have insulin, it can’t grab onto your glucose molecules (your body’s energy) to store it. Your body thinks it doesn’t have enough energy to go around, so it starts breaking down fat to survive. Fat breaks down into acidic “ketones” to use as energy. Basically, the blood becomes filled with ketones from fat breakdown and super high glucose levels from no insulin. Most importantly, this often results in very low blood pressure. This is why in an emergency situation, treatment is insulin (to normalize the glucose levels so the body can fix itself), and pressors (to bring up the blood pressure and avoid fatality). More often than not, the reason it happens is simply poor diabetic control caused by not taking the medications, namely insulin. I’ve seen a variety of reasons why DKA happens, including children. Unfortunately, many of these reasons are financial, which could easily be fixed with government healthcare (and would cost the government less), but that is for another time and place. DKA in a cat would be the same as KDA in a human, except in a cat. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening medical emergency and is characterized by hyperglycemia, acidosis, and ketonemia. DKA is observed in 5–10 % of all pregnancies complicated by pregestational diabetes mellitus. Laboratory findings are as follows: Ketonemia 3 mmol/L and over or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks) Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus Bicarbonate (HCO3 −−) below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3 Common risk factors for DKA in pregnancy are new-onset diabetes, infections like UTI, influenza, poor patient compliance, insulin pump failure, treatment with β-mimetic tocolytic medications, and antenatal corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity. Patient should be counseled about the precipitating cause and early warning symptoms of DKA. DKA should be treated promptly, and HDU/level 2 facility with trained nursing staff and/or insertion of central line is required during pregnancy for its management. Continuous fetal heart rate monitoring commonly demonstrates recurrent late decelerations. Delivery is rarely indicated as FHR pattern resolves as maternal condition improves. DKA therapy can lead to frequent complication of hypoglycemia and hypokalemia, so glucose and K concentration monitoring should be done judiciously. Maternal mortality is rare now with proper management, but fetal mortality is still quite high ranging from 10 to 35 %. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Copyright © 2014 Nupur Sinha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as “accelerated starvation.” Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA). We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids. 1. Introduction A relative insulin deficient state has been well described in pregnancy. This is due to placentally derived hormones including glucagon, cortisol, and human placental lactogen which are increased in periods of stress [1]. The insulin resistance increases with gestational age Continue reading >>

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Summarized from Frise C, Mackillop L, Joash K et al. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol 2012. Available online ahead of publication at: Arterial blood gas analysis in cases of metabolic acidosis reveals primary decrease in pH and bicarbonate, and secondary (compensatory) reduction in pCO2. The most common cause of metabolic acidosis is increased production of endogenous metabolic acids, either lactic acid, in which case the condition is called lactic acidosis, or keto-acids, in which case the condition is called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis most commonly occurs as an acute and life-threatening complication of type I diabetes, due to severe insulin deficiency and resulting reduced glucose availability for energy production within cells (insulin is required for glucose to enter cells). Keto-acids accumulate in blood as a result of metabolism of fats mobilized to fill the energy gap created by reduced availability of glucose within cells. Starvation is also associated with reduced availability of (dietary) glucose and potential for ketoacidosis, although compared with diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis is rare, usually mild and not life-threatening. Except, that is, when it occurs during pregnancy. In a recently published paper the authors outline four cases of severe starvation ketoacidosis, all occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy, following prolonged vomiting over a period of days. All four women presented for emergency admission in a very poorly state and still vomiting with severe partially compensated metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate in the range of 8-13 mmol/L and base deficit in the range of 14-22 mmol/L). All four required transfer to intensive care and premature delivery of their babies by emergency Cesarean section. Fort Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Managing Severe Preeclampsia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Managing Severe Preeclampsia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

US Pharm. 2010;35(9):HS-2-HS-8. Pregnancy is associated with increased levels of emotional and physical stress. Women with preexisting conditions such as hypertension and diabetes require intense prenatal monitoring by health care professionals. Pharmacists in direct contact with patients can play an integral role in identifying signs and symptoms that require immediate care. Two conditions that require emergent treatment in pregnant women are severe preeclampsia and diabetic ketoacidosis. SEVERE PREECLAMPSIA Hypertensive disorders can affect 6% to 8% of women and increase the risk of morbidity and mortality in both the expectant mother and the unborn child.1,2 Hypertension in pregnancy is divided into four categories: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension. The focus in this article is on severe preeclampsia, but a brief discussion of preeclampsia is warranted. Preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific syndrome of unknown etiology, is a multiorgan disease process characterized by the development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks' gestation.1,2 See TABLE 1 for diagnostic criteria.1,2 History of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, chronic hypertension, chronic renal disease, elevated body-mass index, age 40 years or older, multiple gestation, nulliparity, preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, and pregestational diabetes mellitus increase a woman's risk of preeclampsia.1 Preeclampsia is classified as mild or severe based on the degree of hypertension, the level of proteinuria, and the presence of symptoms resulting from the involvement of the kidneys, brain, liver, and cardiovascular system. The incidence of severe preeclampsia is 0.9% in the United States.3 Severe preeclampsia is associate Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Complicated By Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Pregnancy Complicated By Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Maternal and fetal outcomes Despite intensified insulin treatment and strict surveillance of metabolic control in diabetic women during pregnancy, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) complicates 2–9% of diabetic pregnancies (1) and represents the leading cause of fetal loss, with a fetal mortality rate of 30–90% (1–3). From August 1991 to December 2001, 2,025 pregnant women with diabetes were admitted to the University of Tennessee Women’s Hospital. Of these, 888 women (44%) received insulin therapy, and 11 women (1.2%) presented with DKA (blood glucose: 377 ± 27 mg/dl, pH: 7.22 ± 0.01, bicarbonate 7.9 ± 3 mEq/l, and positive serum ketones). White’s diabetic classification included class A2, four patients (27%); class B, five patients (45%); class C, one patient (9%); and class D, one patient (9%). The four women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were African-American, had a mean age of 25 ± 1 year, a BMI of 34 ± 3 kg/m2, and an estimated gestational age of 29 ± 1 weeks. Patients with a previous history of diabetes had a mean duration of diabetes of 6 ± 1 year, a mean age of 27 ± 1 year, a BMI of 30 ± 2 kg/m2, and a gestational age of 28 ± 1 weeks. Infection (27%) and a history of the omission of insulin therapy (18%) were the most common precipitating causes. There were no maternal deaths, and the mean maternal length of hospital stay was 7 ± 2 days. Two patients presented with intrauterine fetal demise, and there was one additional fetal death giving an overall fetal death rate of 27%. During labor, four patients had nonreassuring fetal heart rate tracings in the form of late decelerations that resolved with correction of DKA. At birth, the mean (5 min) Apgar was 8.7 ± 0.4, and fetal weight was 1,278 ± 202 g. Four obese women with DKA had newly d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) remains a medical emergency with high maternal and fetal mortality. Prompt recognition and resuscitative therapy markedly improves outcome. The pathophysiology and management of DKA in pregnancy is discussed in detail in this article. Language English (US) Pages 481-488 Number of pages 8 Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America Volume 26 Issue number 3 DOIs 10.1016/S0889-8545(05)70092-9 State Published - 1999 Externally published Yes Continue reading >>

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