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What Is Ketoacidosis In Cats

Remission Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Remission Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has long been considered a key clinical feature of type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM) in humans although. An increasing number of cases of ketoacidosis have been reported in people with type-2 DM. Hypothesis/Objectives: Cats initially diagnosed with DKA can achieve remission from diabetes. Cats with DKA and diabetic remission are more likely to have been administered glucocorticoids before diagnosis. Animals: Twelve cats with DKA and 7 cats with uncomplicated DM. Methods: Retrospective case review. Medical records of cats presenting with DKA or DM were evaluated. Diabetic remission was defined as being clinically unremarkable for at least 1 month after insulin withdrawal. The cats were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) cats with DKA and diabetic remission; (2) cats with DKA without diabetic remission; and (3) cats with DM and diabetic remission. Results: Seven cats with DKA had remission from diabetes. These cats had significantly higher concentrations of leukocytes and segmented neutrophils, and significantly lower concentrations of eosinophils in blood and had pancreatic disease more often than did cats with uncomplicated DM and diabetic remission. With regard to pretreatment, 3/7 cats in group 1, 1/5 cats in group 2, and 1/7 cats in group 3 had been treated with glucocorticoids. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Remission of DM in cats presenting with DKA is possible. Cats with DKA and remission have more components of a stress leucogram, pancreatic disease, and seemed to be treated more often with glucocorticoids than cats with uncomplicated DM and diabetic remission. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most frequently encountered endocrine disorders in cats. The current classification scheme adapted from human medicine d Continue reading >>

Journal Scan: Survival Data And Prognostic Factors In Cats With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

Journal Scan: Survival Data And Prognostic Factors In Cats With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

Why they did it Information about survival times and prognostic factors among cats with newly diagnosed diabetes will provide valuable information for clinicians to better educate owners about treatment expectations and outcomes. What they did Researchers retrospectively analyzed data from 114 cats in which diabetes mellitus had been newly diagnosed between January 2000 and July 2009. Data included the signalment, presence of concurrent disease, medication history (including use of corticosteroids or progestogens within the last six months), and physical examination findings as well as the presence of ketoacidosis and hematologic and serum chemistry profile information. All cats were reevaluated at regular intervals—typically at one week, two to three weeks, four to six weeks, eight to 12 weeks, and every three to six months as needed—and insulin type was recorded. What they found Researchers found that 95 out of the 114 cats (83.3%) survived to discharge and were treated with either insulin glargine (41.9%) or porcine insulin zinc suspension (58.1%). Ketoacidosis was present in 39 (34.2%) of cats at the time of diagnosis and was not associated with length of survival. Ketoacidosis developed in six cats after discharge—three of these had been diagnosed with ketoacidosis at initial examination. Five of these ketoacidotic cats died or were euthanized between 1 and 8 days after diagnosis. The median survival of diabetic cats was 516 days (range = 1 to 3,468 days). Cats with an elevated creatinine concentration at the time of diagnosis had a 5% greater chance of dying for each 10-µg/dl increase in creatinine. Clinical remission was achieved in 45 cats (39.5%), and these cats were found to have a longer survival time than cats that were persistently diabetic. Overall, Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats?

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats?

When I was working as a clinical ICU pharmacist, I saw DKA more than once. It’s not something you forget easily. Diabetic Ketoacidosis, medically abbreviated at KDA, is an acute (fast onset) life threatening situation that happens as a complication of poorly controlled diabetes. In a nutshell, when your body doesn’t have insulin, it can’t grab onto your glucose molecules (your body’s energy) to store it. Your body thinks it doesn’t have enough energy to go around, so it starts breaking down fat to survive. Fat breaks down into acidic “ketones” to use as energy. Basically, the blood becomes filled with ketones from fat breakdown and super high glucose levels from no insulin. Most importantly, this often results in very low blood pressure. This is why in an emergency situation, treatment is insulin (to normalize the glucose levels so the body can fix itself), and pressors (to bring up the blood pressure and avoid fatality). More often than not, the reason it happens is simply poor diabetic control caused by not taking the medications, namely insulin. I’ve seen a variety of reasons why DKA happens, including children. Unfortunately, many of these reasons are financial, which could easily be fixed with government healthcare (and would cost the government less), but that is for another time and place. DKA in a cat would be the same as KDA in a human, except in a cat. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) In Cats

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) In Cats

Feline Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), the most severe form of Diabetes Mellitus, results in severe changes in blood chemicals including imbalances in small, simple chemicals known as electrolytes. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic condition in which a deficiency of the hormone insulin impairs the body’s ability to metabolize sugar. It is one of the most common endocrine (hormonal) diseases of cats. For more information on the basics of diabetes, go to Diabetes mellitus in cats DKA is a life-threatening condition caused by diabetes mellitus resulting from insulin deficiency that leads to excess production of ketoacids by the liver. Subsequent changes in the blood result that includes metabolic acidosis, electrolyte abnormalities producing severe signs of systemic illness. DKA condition can occur in pets with new diabetes or in current diabetics that decompensate. Secondary diseases and/or infections can cause diabetics to decompensate and develop DKA. What to Watch For Signs associated with DKA depend on the individual cat and the length of time they have been ill. Signs may consist of the classic signs of diabetes including: Increased thirst Increased frequency of urination Weight loss despite a good appetite Sudden blindness Additional signs of DKA include: Lethargy Vomiting Weakness Dehydration Some pets will have a strong smell of acetone from their breath Diagnosis of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Cats Veterinary care should include diagnostic tests to determine level of blood sugar, the presence of ketones, and electrolyte concentrations to help guide subsequent treatment recommendations. Some of these tests include: Complete medical history and thorough physical examination. Serum biochemical profile to determine the blood glucose concentration Continue reading >>

Management Of Feline Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Management Of Feline Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complication of diabetes mellitus with concurrent and often severe metabolic derangements associated with hyperglycaemia, glucosuria, metabolic acidosis, ketonaemia +/- ketonuria. Patients with ketonaemia/ketosis are usually still bright, eating and maintaining their hydration. Those with ketoacidosis are dehydrated, clinically unwell (e.g., anorexia, vomiting, lethargy) and typically require hospitalisation and intensive management. DKA is distinguished from uncomplicated diabetes mellitus (DM) by a relative insulin lack and increased counter-regulatory hormones. The latter are thought to occur secondary to intercurrent disease. Concurrent disease has been documented in approximately 90% of cats with DKA, with the most common being hepatic lipidosis, chronic kidney disease, acute pancreatitis, bacterial or viral infections and neoplasia (Bruskiewicz et al. 1997). Heinz bodies, neutrophilia with a left shift, increased ALT and azotaemia is common. Most cats presenting with DKA are newly diagnosed diabetics or recently diagnosed but poorly controlled diabetics. Diagnosis Hyperglycaemia, Glucosuria, Metabolic Acidosis Plus Ketones in Plasma and/or Urine Traditionally DKA has been diagnosed using urinary ketone dipsticks, which detect acetoacetate but not beta-hydroxybutyrate. However as the latter is the principle ketone body in DKA, measuring serum beta-hydroxybutyrate is a more sensitive indicator of DKA. In humans portable meters that measure beta-hydroxybutyrate in whole blood have largely superseded urine dipsticks. These ketone meters have recently proven useful in diagnosing DKA in cats, although they tend to underestimate beta-hydroxybutyrate at higher values (Zeugswetter, Rebuzzi 2012; Weingart et al. 2012). In the absence of a ke Continue reading >>

When And How To Check For Them

When And How To Check For Them

Information provided about specific medical procedures or conditions is for educational purposes to allow for educated, on-going discussion with your vet and is not intended to replace veterinary advice. Diabetic Cat Care Ketones Many of us have heard of ketogenic diets; used often by bodybuilders, or to help with weight loss. The science is that by keeping the body in a ketone producing state, fat stores will be used by the body, weight will drop off much more quickly. That may be fine for humans, but producing ketones is the last state we want our diabetic cats to be in. Ketones occur when the body cannot access blood glucose for energy. Left untreated, ketones build up in the system and can lead to a life threatening situation called Diabetic Ketoacidosis, also known as DKA. While development of ketones is not an "immediate emergency", the progression of excessive ketones which develop into diabetic ketoacidosis IS a very real emergency situation requiring immediate veterinary care and very aggressive treatment. Catching ketones at low levels, before they get out of control, and then taking immediate and appropriate action can save your cat’s life. Ketones are a direct result of hyperglycemia (high BG). Ketones can develop because of not enough insulin, illness, infection, and/or anorexia. In humans, ketones can be produced when the body burns too much fat storage for energy. While practicing TR it is very rare for a cat to produce ketones once the BG is well regulated. That said, at the start of TR, right after diagnosis, if your cat is sick, or when making an insulin switch, its strongly recommended as a precaution to test for ketones if your cat is over renal threshold (225/12.5) for longer than a day. For those cats prone to quick ketone production, checking fo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Also see Pet Diabetes Wiki: Ketoacidosis A Ketone Primer by an FDMB user What are Ketones? Ketones or ketone bodies (acetone, acetoacetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) are waste products of fatty acid breakdown in the body. This is the result of burning fat, rather than glucose, to fuel the body. The body tries to dispose of excess ketones as quickly as possible when they are present in the blood. The kidneys filter out ketones and excrete them into the urine. Should you care about ketones? YES! If they build up, they can lead to very serious energy problems in the body, resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis, a true medical emergency. If the condition is not reversed and other systemic stresses are present, ketones may continue to rise and a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may occur. This condition can progress very quickly and cause severe illness. It is potentially fatal even when treated. Recognition of DKA and rapid treatment by your veterinarian can save your cat's life. Signs of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Drinking excessive amounts of water OR no water Excessive urination Diminished activity Not eating for over 12 hours Vomiting Lethargy and depression Weakness Breathing very fast Dehydration Ketone odor on breath (smells like nail-polish remover or fruit) Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus Inadequate insulin dosing or production Infection Concurrent diseas that stresses the animal Estrus Medication noncompliance Lethargy and depression Stress Surgery Idiopathic (unknown causes) Risk Factors for DKA Any condition that causes an insulin deficiency History of corticosteroid or beta-blocker administration Diagnosis Laboratory tests performed by your vet are necessary for diagnosis. Depending on how sick your c Continue reading >>

Using Glargine For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Using Glargine For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Using glargine intravenously for diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis results from prolonged inadequate insulin activity. The main aims of therapy are to supply exogenous insulin, restore hydration status and manage electrolyte disturbances. Ketoacidotic cats usually present severely dehydrated and as such, have reduced absorption from subcutaneous tissue (from reduced blood flow). Until hydration is restored, insulin must be administered either intravenously or intramuscularly. For many years, the insulin of choice for treating ketoacidosis has been regular insulin due to its rapid onset, potent glucose lowering effect and predictably short duration of action. Glargine has almost identical properties to that of regular insulin when used intravenously (Scholtz et al, 2003). Its actions are so similar that glargine can simply be substituted for regular insulin (for all your current protocols just draw glargine up instead of regular insulin). There are no reported clinical trials in the human literature assessing glargine administered intravenously as it was accepted to have no benefit over regular insulin. Regular insulin is used solely to treat diabetic ketoacidosis and many veterinary clinics chose not to stock it (or use it well after the expiry date) as the disease is seen so infrequently and most of the vials are wasted. Glargine on the other hand, can be used in DKA as well as maintenance therapy and most clinics have it on hand for diabetic cats. We mix glargine with normal saline, hartmann’s or 2.5% glucose solution. It is uncertain how long it will stay active in these solutions so suggest a new solution is made every 24hrs. Glargine can be administered to ketoacidotic cats by: infusing intravenously at a rate of 0.05-0.1 U/kg/hr and rate adjusted to ma Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats

Diabetic ketoacidosis requires urgent veterinary treatment. With ketoacidosis, the lack of insulin causes the body to burn fat and muscle creating ketones. The kidneys are unable to filter all of the ketones from the blood. As a result, these ketones build up in the bloodstream, turning the blood extremely acidic. This is a dangerous stage of diabetes that causes blood chemical and blood sugar imbalances, and also impairs brain function. Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis can lead to diabetic coma and death. Understanding Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus is more commonly referred to as diabetes. With this disease, the feline's pancreas fails to properly regulate the flow of insulin within the body. Without the proper levels of insulin, the cat eats more, but fats and protein break down into energy, so the cat loses weight. Sugar levels within the blood skyrocket and are released in the urine. Cats often require insulin injections to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. With non-insulin dependent diabetes, diet, weight loss and exercise may be enough to keep blood sugar levels down. If a cat's blood sugar levels are properly monitored, a cat with diabetes is unlikely to face any serious health issues. If diabetic ketoacidosis does occur, call your vet immediately. Signs of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The most common signs of ketoacidosis in cats are excessive thirst and frequent urination. However, you should also watch for: Breath smells of nail polish remover/acetone Excessive appetite Vision changes/blindness Vomiting Weakness Weight loss Ketoacidosis can occur with an infection or illness. It can also happen if the insulin amounts need altering. Your vet will find a cause and create a new treatment plan you will follow at home. Diagnosis and Treatment When you bring Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

This article is about diabetes mellitus in cats. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in cats, whereby either insufficient insulin response or insulin resistance lead to persistently high blood glucose concentrations. Diabetes could affect up to 1 in 230 cats,[1] and may be becoming increasingly common. Diabetes mellitus is less common in cats than in dogs. 80-95% of diabetic cats experience something similar to type-2 diabetes, but are generally severely insulin-dependent by the time symptoms are diagnosed. The condition is treatable, and treated properly, the cat can experience a normal life expectancy. In type-2 cats, prompt effective treatment may lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Symptoms[edit] Cats will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks or months, and it may escape notice for even longer.[citation needed] The first outward symptoms are a sudden weight loss (or occasionally gain), accompanied by excessive drinking and urination; for example, cats can appear to develop an obsession with water and lurk around faucets or water bowls. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to three-times normal) or absent. These symptoms arise from the body being unable to use glucose as an energy source. A fasting glucose blood test will normally be suggestive of diabetes at this point. The same home blood test monitors used in humans are used on cats, usually by obtaining blood from the ear edges or paw pads. As the disease progresses, ketone bodies will be present in the urine, which can be detected with the same urine stri Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Cat: Recognition And Essential Treatment.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In The Cat: Recognition And Essential Treatment.

Abstract Practical relevance: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a not uncommon emergency in both newly diagnosed and poorly regulated diabetic cats. When there is a heightened metabolic rate and energy requirement due to concurrent illness, an increase in the release of glucose counter-regulatory hormones causes insulin receptor resistance, lipolysis, free fatty acid release and ketogenesis. This necessitates not only treatment to eliminate the ketosis and control blood glucose, but also investigation of concurrent illnesses. Clinical challenges: A number of metabolic derangements can occur with DKA, requiring a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, elimination of ketones, careful correction of glucose, electrolyte and acid base abnormalities, and close monitoring. AUDIENCE: Any veterinarian that cares for cats in urgent and emergency situations should understand the pathophysiology of DKA in order to address an individual's clinical signs and metabolic derangements. Evidence base: This review draws evidence from the peer-reviewed literature as well as the author's personal clinical experience. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus and should be regarded as a medical emergency. DKA is defined as a severe metabolic acidosis of blood (pH <7.35) which occurs secondary to sustained fatty acid (ketones) release from fat stores in response to energy demands experienced by feline diabetic patients. Classically, DKA is characterised by metabolic acidosis, ketosis and ketonuria. It can sometimes be confused with feline hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. The two main ketones are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, which are produced by the liver and serve as an energy source for tissue in times of low insulin levels. (prolonged fasting, starvation, diabetes mellitus) or insulin resistance[1]. Clinical signs Clinical signs include sudden collapse, dehydration, weakness, depression, vomiting, and an increased respiratory rate. DKA can occur at any age and there is no breed or gender predisposition with this disease. It appears commonly in obese cats or cats with a history of sudden weight gain. Concurrent disease predispose cats, especially diabetic ones to developing DKA. Concurrent illnesses include chronic renal disease, hepatic lipidosis, acute pancreatitis, bacterial or viral infections and neoplasia[2]. Hyperglycaemia and hypoinsulinaemia contribute significantly to a shift of potassium to the extracellular fluid. However, with rehydration, potassium ions are lost from the extracellular fluid and hypokalemia develops rapidly. Insulin therapy may worsen hypokalemia because insulin shifts potassium into cells. The most important clinical significance of hypokalemia in DKA is profound muscle weakness, which may result in ventroflexion of the neck and, in extreme cases, respiratory paralysis. In one study of cats with DKA, most cats Continue reading >>

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

The Signs, Diagnosis & Types Of Diabetes Mellitus In Cats

There are certain signs or symptoms which are commonly seen in cats with diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, these signs also occur in other diseases and conditions. Therefore, laboratory tests are necessary to diagnose diabetes mellitus in cats. The following article includes a discussion of how this diagnosis is made and the types of diabetes found in cats. What are the signs of diabetes mellitus in cats and why do they occur? Depending on how severely insulin production is impaired, there may be few signs of disease, or the signs may be severe. Dogs with diabetes often develop cataracts; cats do not. The most common signs of diabetes are: Increased thirst (polydipsia) and urination (polyuria) Change in appetite Weight loss Change in gait (walking) Decreased activity, weakness, depression Vomiting Increased Thirst and Urination: Because the glucose cannot enter the cells, the glucose levels in the blood become abnormally high (hyperglycemia). The glucose is filtered out by the kidneys and is found in the urine (glucosuria). When it is filtered out, it carries water with it. The animal, then, is losing more water through the urine than normal and has to make up for it by drinking more. Inappropriate Elimination: The increased urination may result in the cat not always urinating in the litter box. This inappropriate urination may be one of the first signs of diabetes in cats. In addition, cats with diabetes can often develop urinary tract infections, which may also result in inappropriate elimination. Change in Appetite: Some diabetic cats eat less, because frankly, they do not feel well. Other cats may have voracious appetites and eat a lot (polyphagia) because their hypothalamus keeps telling them they are hungry. Weight Loss: Because the cat cannot use the calories he Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an emergency. DKA develops due to: Long standing undiagnosed diabetes mellitus Insufficient insulin dose in treated diabetics Reduced insulin action - caused by obesity , concurrent illness or drugs. This is the cause of more than two-thirds of cases of DKA. What causes DKA? Due to a lack of insulin , glucose cannot be used by the body cells as an energy source. Instead fat is broken down to provide energy. When fat is used as an energy source, acids known as ketones are produced. Ketones circulating in the blood cause signs of DKA - anorexia, nausea and lethargy. Diagnosis The diagnosis of DKA is based on detecting ketones in the urine and sometimes in the blood along with signs of illness. See Urine Monitoring for more information. Treatment DKA is an emergency and treatment must be started as soon as possible. Your veterinary surgeon will administer intravenous fluids and insulin and correct any underlying disorders to stabilise your cat. Once your cat is stabilised it will be started on long term insulin therapy again. Continue reading >>

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